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January 19, 1928 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-01-19

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THURSDAY,

JANUARY 19, 1928

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGH FIVV~

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TMRS.MANSFIELD BEGAN CAREER OF DNNVIPALhll'AI1lM"SINCERE FEELING C
T\I KETS FO ST100KDRAMATIC INT ERPRET ATION IN YOUT H iIOfLLur U TO BUSINESS OF P

PLAYS ABEON
kPresidents Of Sororities And
ized houses To Have Clip
Of Ticket Sale
LEAGUE WILL BENI
Yesterday marked the begin
the ticket sale by the Wome
gue for the Rockford Playe
will appear at the Whitney
for ten weeks of stock, begin
Sunday, Jan. 22. A meeting
central committee was called
tha Cook building by Janic
'28, chairman of the commit
this time final plans were co
for the camr'aign and a dist
of tickets to the various hous
dents was made.
The presidents of the vari
rvrities and league houses ar
ead into committees under a
head, andl the sale of tickets
handled through these com
The house presidents will be
sible to their committee head
these ten committee heads
turn work with the genera
man.
Members of the central cw
are as follows: Janice Peck,
man, Margaret Stewart, Edt
ray , Dorothy Swartout,
T1readwell, Martha Robinson
Bachus, Audrey Haney, Ruth
son, Ruth Hyde, and Catherin

By Eleanor Seribner, '29
After waiting practically two hours very dissatisfied with his leading
in the lobby of the Whitney hotel, I- lady, and having heard of me, accord-
Orgai- was amply rewarded by meeting Mrs. ingly sent word that he would like to s s ts
Organ- talk with me. of course I was Major students in the physical col-
arge Richard Mansfield, who is in Ann frightened, but I was exceedigly ucation department gave a demonstra-
Arbor with the Rockford players. She glad to have him want to try me in tion of the regular class work which
invited me to her room where she most the part. I was engaged, and after
EFIT graciously recounted her experiences that I generally played as his leading they have been doing this semester
in the theater.- lady, under the stage name of last Tuesday night in Barbour gym-
"How did you happen to go on the Beatrice Cameron. nasium. The order of events was as
~nig f tag?"I ske hr."Some of my most interesting roles flos
n's lea- Mrs. Mansfield smiled and said, were those of Portia in 'The Merchant follows:.
rs who "Contrary to most peoples opinions, of Venice,' and Lady Anne in 'Richard . Clogging............Sophomores
theater not all actors and actresses come the Third.' I enjoyed the, role of g. Ggics.............Seniors
from families intimately connected Nora in Ibsen's 'Doll's House.' And 4. Gymnastics .............. Seniors
ing tn with the theater. Not one of my rel- that of Raina in Shaw's 'Arms and the 4. Natural Dancing ..........Jumors
of the atives had ever been on the stage! I Man.' When we played 'Richard the 5. Stunts.Sophomores
at Mar- am from New England and am a May- Third' in London at the Glade theater 6. Folk Dancing ............Juniors
e Peck, flower descendant, which does not we had the greatest archaeologist in 7. Relay ................All Classes
seem to fit in with some people's England, and the best costumes in 8. Games. ............All Classes
)mpleted ideas of the stage. My father, who London to arrange the scenes. I The only events which were co-
ributi was an attorney, had a remarkable was a glorious spectacle." petitive were the three in which all
epreibnspeaking voice, and he encouraged me "How long did you play with your classes took part, the posture parade,
e presi to sp-ak pieces, which was quite fash- husband?" I asked. the relay, and the games. The seniors
ionable at that time. From my early "I played the lead in most of his won with a total score. of 13 points,
ous sr childhood I had the desire to go on plays for 20 years. Mr. Mansfield and the juniors came in second with 10
e divid- the stage, so, encouraged by my ex- I never played in 'cheap' plays. We points, the freshman were third and
geierl periences in reciting, I started for thought that the people really want- the sophomores last. The judges for
mittees New York. ed the best, and would be better satis- these events were Dr. Bell, head of
mieesn "Most girls have an unusually hard fied with the best. We always kept the physical education department,
rdspon- time getting started, but I was hired to this ideal. During the last few Mrs. Van Sickle, Miss McCormick,
is, and for a small part almost immediately. years I have not been on the stage and Miss Hodgson.
will in At the same time Richard Mansfield except with the Rockford players," The stunts of the sophomores con-
I chair- was playing in 'Prince Karl.' He was she concluded. sisted of a tumbling act which was a
combination of exercises learned in
.? ,itte WOM N I "' class. The natural dancing event
haWMENDE-RE 'O AYS. EDUCATION s t rgn
N' Ih C U Y P A E I I L S V A again demonstrated the class work
Elanor- CC Y WILL SAVE.M AN and what has grown out of it, or the
Eleanor CUBAN ASSEMBLY _group dance. The students had to
,omai Li of o work out what they were to do for
Thlomp- At the Pan-American conference to Daniel L. Marsh, president of Bos- themselves.
e Price.t
be held at Havana, the firs trst tv ton university, says that the problem All the organization of the demon-

"The expression of any art depends
on two things," says Miss Ione John-}
son, instructor in natural da-nng,1
"sincere feeling and good form, and
this as true in the field of the dance
as it is in any other field. Too often
one or the other of these qualities is
ignored. For instance, in interpretive
(lancing, many believe that it is
enough just to interpret feeling with-
out good form,, but this is not true.
Then at the other extreme, there are
certain other schools of the dance
which have been narrowed down to
form alone, until all the sincere feel-
ing the artist may feel is definitely
limited by the form."
"The type of work we are trying to
do in natural dancing," she continu-
es, "is to take the natural urge for
self expression in each individual and
guide it by giving the person a means
of using it. This means is the body.
The urge for self expression was
very evident in primitive man and he
tried to give it some form. The dance
was really his only n'eans of doing
this, because he had no other instru-
ment to use in the beginning but his
body. Later he specialized aid cre-
ated new means of expression." j
"But we have grown in the many
generations that have passed, and
people have acquired such a wealth
of expression that there are now
1many different types of (ancing
which reu~resent, the method used by
different peoples. We have the bal-
let, the survival of an old form of
the sophisticated dance of the court
life of Europe. We have both folk
dancing and ballroom dancing re-
presenting group interpretation of
music, but the results are different
because a different, social group are
doing it."
S"Finally we have this new move-
m ent called, Inatural dancing." she
i continued, "which tries to teach peo-
ple control of the body and how to
express the self through it. The body
is the instrument we work with just
as the piano is the instrument of the
musician. We study technique or
form and the fundamental laws con-
trolling the body and mind, and we

\ONTRIBUTES ART
IATURAL DANCING"
A'pha
try to educate the mind through the pledging
body. Detroit.
Miss Johnson also mentioned that Alpha
as it was necessary to have as per of Dorot
feet an instrument as possible, any Pa
posture or other physipal defects are
corrected, and one also learns con- Chi On
fidence in the way to handle the fF
body. Minn.
"We work for technique," she went i
on to say, "but we never let it stop Collgei
there, for after control is learned, pledging
then the dancer must create some- troit.
thing, make some new combination! of
what he has learned. We are notC
satisfied with mere skillful perform-
ance and this is why we believe nat- ARE
ural dancing to be so valuable." W
"We are interested in the dance," MOA
concluded Miss Johnson, "not as an
objective, but in what it does for the Million
individual. If it fulfills its purpose, the Wom
it will enable the student to appre- cordingi
ciate art in any field in life." dent of
-____I____Women's
CHOOSE "AVERAGE GIRL" Californi
of WOme
At the request of their college pa- Washing
per, 165 women of the Texas State clubs ha
College for Women chose, by bal- and not
lots, their ideal of an "average girl." closure,
She is Miss Lillian Goodnight, of Al- The w
1 H Trai-sed $4
h*ilenie, Texas. rre
Miss Goodnight is a sophomore, because
. conserva
and is sage of1"t, e""o
course. "I just want to learn to hospitali
ook," she explained. Mrs. Gre
At college she does not participate fornia f
actively in athletics. At home she of comn
plays golf, rides horseback, swims, on laws,
and drives a cai. She "adores" danc- the dire
ing. She likes light operas and pic-Liea
ture shows, books of poetry in theLinema
more profound sphere, and magazin- All v
es with a good mixture of stories, Indiana
illustrations and humor. She has ing to
made slightly better than average times"a
since coming to college. by thed
!__ _- offenset
It seems urobable that women will credit a
never be eligible fcr the Rhodes expelled
Scholarship because, since women -
were not admitted to Oxford when Thatt
Cecil Rhodes made his will, there co-opera
are no provisions for them to re- of Willi
ceive awards. Republi
Ii- -

NOTICES
Omicron Pi announces the
of Helen Maynard, '30, of
Phi announces the pledging
,y McKee, '30, of Greensburg,
mega announces the pledging
ces Raiter, '30L, of Cloquet,
ate Sorosis announces the
of Virginia Arms, '30, of De-
IFORNIA CLUBS
FINANCED BY
4EN OF STATE
as of dollars are invested in
nen's clubs of California, ac-
to Mrs. W. W. Green, presi-
the California Federation of
s clubs and director froix
ia in the General Federation
en's clubs, held last week at
ton, D.C. Every one of these
as been financed by women,
one has been lost by fore-
she said.
women of California recently
4,500 to buy a redwood grove,
of their intense interest in
tion, and sponsored the pas-
a statute providing for proper
ization of 'narcotic addicts;
een further stated. The Cali-
ederation is stressing the "law
mon things" in their division
business and insurance under
ection of Mrs. Mab Copland
n, of Los Angeles.
women at the University of
must wear bloomers "reach-
the top of her hose at all
according to a decree issued
dean of women. For the first
the woman will lose five hours
nd for the second she will be
from the university,
women have shown the proper
ation in politics is the opinion
am M. Butler, chairman of the
can National Committee.

ils committee williue to meet:;
one afternoon each week for the du-
ration of the players' stay.
INCIDENTALS BULK TOO
MUCH IN MODERN LIFE
The greatest tendency of young
people today is to let incidentals bulk
too large in their lives, is the state-
nent of President Farrand made in
an address given recently to tl, wo-I
men students of Cornell university.
Education has for an object the
presentation of a mass of facts, Pres-
ident Farrand believes, and with
these facts the student should be able
to form' a background of information
against which he can lay all views
that he derives, and by which he can
judge what the valuation of those
views may be.
At the ninth annual climb of the
Ada-rman club to the summit of Pike's
Peak, 14,109 feet high, the party en-
countered snow 18 feet deep, tem-
perature of 36 below zero, and a gale
of 75 miles an hour which blew them
to the ground as they rounded Windy
Point. Fireworks were displayed from
the top to inform Colorado Springs of
their safe arrival.
Mrs. Alice A. Winter recently won
the national "best book" contest of the
Amercian Pen Women's association
with her book "The Heritage of
Women."
SUFFRAGE AND WOMAN'S A
SUBJECTS FOR DEBATE

between nations ever proposedl y of the youth of today is the age olL
women for women will be suggested. one of 'saving' society.j
In order to accomplish its task, the
It will provide for the abolishment of rising generation must succeed in re-
their nonparticipation in the confer- juvenating a moral and social con-
ence, and those backing it depend on science which, despite the best inten-
the supremacy of treaty rights over tions of society shows signs of "peter-
all other laws to establish a principle ing out" periodically. It is education,I
which may- equalize the rig hts of Ilhe believes, that will help in the sav-
wing process.
women. "Education bears a vital relation-
The plan is being fostered by the ship to the maintenance of a rightly
National Women's Party, which has ordered society," President Marsh
sent Doris Stevens, chairman of its says. "It is the indispensable means
committee on International Action, to by which society shapes its ends and
Havana to see what can be done. Hope its progress.
is being based on the action of the "It is impossible to capitalize the
conference five years ago, when a good things of each generation so
resolution was passed providing for strongly that the accumulated moral
the protection of the moral, physical, strength will not subside and ulti-
and intellectual education of women. mately end in bankruptcy unless its
A reaffirmation of that resolution strength is renewed with each genera-
and the adoption of a treaty setting tion. That means that each genera-
forth the equality of women is now tion is faced with the necessity of
being asked. saving society.
"As a result, education must play
NEW MEXICO NORMAL UNIVER- its part and each generation must be
SITY - Initiation regulations were taught certain fundamentals essential
made recently by upperclassmen, that to an orderly state of society.
all freshmen women appear on the "Among other things, America's
campus in gingham dresses worn youth must be taught to place only
"back-side-foremost," hair in five good and worthy men in positions of
braids, and vari-colored shoes and power, to enact just and equal laws
hose. and to enforce the laws upon all alike,1
without delay and without fear of
Four thousand girls at Hunter col- favor, for delay causes fermentation
lege sacrificed their lunch hour to of unsocial propaganda.
challenge the accusation of cribbing "America's youth must learn to
on exams made by the school paper. think straight so that liberty shall
not be confronted with license, nor
LLEGED REVOLT ARE public opinion with mob psychology;
E IN BROOKLYN DISCUSSION to appeal to reason instead of to
physical force and violence as a
tribute to the race those things which means of settling disputes, and to rise
our brains are capable of, are we, above all class and racial feud and
by virtue of our motherhood one whit hatred and jealousy and animosity."
superior to the cat with its kittens."
Suffrage, she contends, was won by Detroit City college will offer two
"a small, intelligent, sophisticated new courses in home economics. One
group and was literally thrust on will be Clothing Selection, which will
the masses. Women," she continued, include clothing psychology, and the
"will never be free until they rid other will be Clothing Construction.
them'selves of a lot of nonsensical

stration was done by a committee of
three junior women, Jeannette Saur-
born, chairman, Helen Clark, and
Rose Strasser. There was no outside
preparation for any event and the
whole program was simply a demon-
stration of the work which has been
I done in the professional school dur-
ing the semester.
There will be a swimming meet for
the same group, the students of the
major school of the physical educa-
tion department from S to 10 o'clock
today at the Union pool.

11lIi

OWerday's Flowers
Spring Flowers and Roses
Violets and Sweetpeas
Order Party Decorations
Here
Full Line Tapers and Candles
4
Phone 7014

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m
p
re
F
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to
tu
di
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[fi
t l
th
th
cc
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Opinions were various at a recent
ebate given at the Brooklyn Acade-
y of Music before several thousand
eople, as to whether woman has in
eality staged a revolt.
The arguments were -advanced by
anny Hurst, Elizabeth Marbury, and
rs. Will Durant, all of whom agreed
nally that "woman is what she is
)day as an effect not of her own na-

Store
Nickels Arcade

Greenhouses
1400 Traver

""Flowers by Wire"

r"

'a

11

are or desires, but merely as a ideas about themselves which they
roduct o .a changed environment ,deliberately foster and encourage the
ue to the industrial and mechanical men to believe." One of these ideas
go." is that women are physically weaker
"Sex is no longer idealized," said than men, another that their mental
rs. Durant. "Many women mistake processes are different, that they
mood for a career and mistake a have a "wonderful thing called in-
areer for motherhood." tuition to take the place of the rea-
Fannie Hurst disagreed. "What we son they are too lazy to use."
eed,"' she said, "is a rebellion of According to Miss Marbury, women
Ie heart and mind-- a realization have nothing over which to revolt.
iat motherhood is a purely animal "If women were the ones paying ali-
nction and that only when we be- mony, there would probably be some-
ome better wives and more intel- thing to revolt about," she said, "as
gent mothers and in addition con- well as fewer divorces."

LAST WEEK
of special
Oriental Rug
SALE
at reduced prices

1=1 tlllliltltlllif 1~ ltlilltlll911l d t !~ n~~1I9li Ut~ Ct tly 1lilll11t1

p p
University School ofMusic
Second Semester Begins Feb. 6
Degree and Certificate Courses for those who are
Candidates for Graduation
GENERAL COURSES FOR SPECIAL STUDENTS
EARL V. MOORE, MUSICAL DIRECTOR

Dashing
Vivid
" Styles

1

Mr. Jamgotch is leaving Ann Arbor soon after a very
successful sale here, and is making every effort to sell more at

greatly reduced prices before this special sale closes.

This

As fresh as the morning-
As new as tomorrow.
Spring Frocks
$9.75 and $14.95

BYJ IFOX BACHER, Solfeggio
GLENN CARLSON, Sociology
PALMER CHRISTIAN, Organ
DONNA ESSELSTYN, Piano
NICHOLAS FALCONE, Band Instruments
MARIAN STRUBLE FREEMiAN, Violin
LUCILE GRAHAM, Piano
~JAMES HAMIILTONi, Voice
THEODORE HARRISO, Voice
JUVA HIGBEE, )Iethods
R. .1' I. HOLLISTER, Public Speaking
NORA CRANE HUNT, Voice
CASSIUS JOLLEV, Solfeggio
GRACE JOHNSON KONOLD, Voice
EDITH IKOON, Piano
ALBERT LOCKWOOD, Piano
e UJL' T)I'I).'d'I I T'I'im m . m.,.

GLENN McGEOCH, History
MARGARET MacGREGOR, Organ
JOSEPH E. MADDY, Methods
GUY IAIER, Piano
LOIS MAIER, Piano
MARTHA 3-ERKLE, Piano
MAUD OiKKELBERG, Piano
LILA PARGMENT, French
HAN NS PICK, 'Cello
MABEL ROSS RHEAD, Piano
LEON SLATER, Psychology
IIELEN SNYDER, Rhetoric
OTTO J. STAHL, Piano and Theory
NELL B. STOCKWELL, Piano
iMAY A. STRONG, Voice
WAlT!''ER WELI{ E, Methods
NORA S. WETMORE, Voice

I

I

is a rare chance to select oriental rugs from such a great col-
lection at such low prices.
We still have some oriental brassware,
Indian prints, embroideries, etc., which must
be closed out regardless of cost.
This is your chance.
(Third Floor)

...c Ih

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