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May 10, 1928 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-05-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

AY, MAY 10. 1928.

Tt4r. MTCNTr.AN DAILY

_.._ _.. -a_.. _____ -- - ._.__..._.

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VAM M&b'wA

iLsr

niiiEr CODY flQ[NEW FRIEZE MEMORIAL ORGAN WILL
BE DEDICATED BY PALMER CHRISTIAN
CHAIRMAN FR NEXT

JUNIOR GIRLS' PLAY'
ELIZABETH WELLMAN EXPLAINS
TRADITIONS OF PLAY AND
SUMMARIZES WORK
ELECT COMMITTEE HEADS
Chairman Of Publicity, Music, Dance,
And Make-Up Committees To
Be Appointed
For general chairman of the next
Junior Girls' play, Louise Cody was
elected yesterday afternoon at a meet-
ing of sophomore women in Sarah
Caswell Angell hall. The assistant
chairman of the play, the business
manager, chairman of programs, and
chairman of properties were also
elected at this meeting.
Dorothy McKee is the successful
candidate for assistant chairman, Mar-
garet Sibley for business manager,
Dorothy Bloom for chairman of pro-
grams, and Doris Renkenberger for
chairman of properties.
Before the election was held, Eliza-
beth Wellman, '29, this year's general
chairman, explained to the meeting
the traditions of the Junior Girls' play
and also summarized briefly the work
of the various chairmen of the play
committees. -
Comniittee Chooses Director
The first important duty of the exe-
cuti've committee is the choosing of
a play director, Miss Wellman de-
clared. She then discussed each of the'
chairmanships in turn, beginning with
the -assistant chairman.
To the assistant chairman fall many
of the miscellaneous duties which do
not form part of the work of any
specific committee. She must keep a
list of every woman who participates
in the play, revising this list from
time to time on account of ineligibili-
ties. She is also responsible for the
attendance at rehearsals, and since
only she, the play director, and the
dance chairman can grant excuses
from rehearsals, her committee must
be small and compact, and she must
do a great deal of telephoning with
regard to time of practices.
Keeps Expense Record
The business manager, Miss Wellman
remarked, must do most of the wor-
rying with regard to finances. She
keeps a budget and must see to it
that each of the. various chairmen
keeps within the total allowed her.
She must keep track of every cent
spent in connection with the play, and
finally when the play has been given,
she must see that the bills are paid.
The chairman of programs not only'
has to make sure that all the lists of
choruses, etc.. which are printed in1
the program are correct; she' has to1
sell the advertising in the program,
make arrangements with lithograph-:
ers and engravers, and conduct the
sale of programs.
Upon the chairman of propertiesI
falls the responsibility of providing
everything that goes on the stage ex-
cept the actual scenery.
To Appoint Other Chairmen
The other chairmen of the play will1
be appointed by the general chairman.
They are: publicity chairman, chair-
man of music, dance chairman, and
chairman of make-up. The appoint-
ment of the publicity chairman is a
change from the procedure of prev-
ious years. She has hitherto been
elected, but, as this has not always
resulted in the choice of a woman
connected with The gaily and famil-
iar with publicity work, it has been
decided that she should be appointed.
Miss Wellman emphasized the fact
that the junior class each year dele-
gates to the executive committee of
its play a tremendous amount of re-
sponsibility. It is charged with the
task of producing a successful musical
comedy-a comedy that is a success
financially as well as otherwise. The
wise choice of committee heads thus
becomes a matter of vital importance.

Paliner Christian At The Organ
With the May Festival this year is in the first rank with the great

comes the dedication of the new
Frieze Memorial organ. The old Frieze
Memorial stood in the Music building
at the Columbian Exposition in Chi-
cago in 1893, where it was acclaimed
by performers and audiences as one
of the outstanding instruments, ton-
ally and mechanically, in the United
States. Farrand and Votey o'f Detroit
built it. This organ was one of the
first to exemplify the electropneuma-
tic principle of action. At the con-
clusion of the Columbian Exposition
the organ was purchased by the Uni-
versity of Michigan Musical Society.
dismantled and re-erected in old Uni-
versity Hall as a gift to the Universityj
in honor of Professor Henry Simmons
Ftieze, former President of the Uni-
versity Musical Society,
In 1913 the organ was removed to
Hill auditorium and partially modern-
ized by the Hutchins Organ company
of Boston, a new console and four or
five stops being added. The electro-
pneumatic principle has been changed
greatly during the past few years so
that the old organ was not modern.
The Board of Regents, recognizing
this, authorized in 1927 complete re-
construction of the organ by the Skin-!
ner Organ company of Boston. Only
a few pipes of the old organ were re-
tained.
In size and equipment this organ

organs of the world. There are seven
separate organs. There are the great
and echo organs with 61 notes. The
swell, choir, solo, and string organs
have 73 notes. There are 8,000 pipes,
varying in height from 32 feet to one
inch, and in width from two feet to
one quarter of an inch. There are five
keyboards, four of which are played
by the hands. None of the mechan-
ism of the organ is within the con-
sole. For that reason the console is
very small. There is a remote con-
trol mechanism for adjustable stop
combinations. The console can be
moved about the stage because in the
back of it there is placed a union
board with 40,000 thousand, contacts
which connects the organ with the
mechanism behind the stage. When the
union board is removed the organ is
without power and so can be moved
about at will.
Next Tuesday night, May 15, Palm-
er Christian of the University School
of Music will play the new Frieze
Memorial organ to two hundred in-
vited organists and to all the students
who can be there. Seniors are espec-
ially urged to hear the organ then.
as there will be but few other chances
before graduation. On Wednesday
night, May 16. Palmer Christian will
again play with the orchestra in con-
nection with the May Festival. #
I NOTTCFS

.t

BANQUE T TO BEHELD
FOR LEAGUE OFFICERS'
Installation Of Board Members And
Officers To Be Held At The
New Field House
EVERYONE URGEI TO COME
Installation of the officers and board
of the Women's league for the year
1928-29 will take place at the annualI
installation banquet which will be
held tonight from 5:30 to 7 o'clock at
the new women's field house.
Several sororities and dormitories
are planning to attend the banquet
in groups, and many others have also
procured reservations. This is the
second of two open meetings which
the League is holding this year, and
it is important that everyone who can
come should be present.
The officers and board members who
were elected on April 4, and who are
to be installed at the banquet tonight
are as follows: Mary White, '29, presi-
dent; Virginia Read, '29, vice presi-
dent; Margaret Bush, '30, correspond-
ing secretary; Gertrude Smith, '30,
recording secretary; Dorothy Beck,
'30, treasurer; Jessie Church, '29, and
Jean Hathaway, '29, senior represen-
tatives; Louise Cody, '30, and Eloise
Avery, '30, junior representatives;
Frances Movy, '31, and Helen Jones,
'31, sophomore representatives; and
Vera Johnston, '29, Helen Fellows,
'30, and Margaret Babcock, '30, mem-
hers of the judiciary council.
DETROIT FLIGHT
INCLUDES WOMEN
With the coming of U. of M. day at
Ford Airport Saturday, May 12, the
women on campus, along with the men,
will be able to take advantage of ex-
ceedingly low rates for a 25 minute
flight over Detroit. For anyone never
having had the opportunity of taking
an airplane flight, this conducted trip,
and tour through the Ford-Stout air-
port, located at the Ford airport,
which is one of the largest and most
completely equipped commercial air-
ports in the country, should prove an
enjoyable experience.
Lindbergh in his successful flight
over the Atlantic depended on the
same type of engine, the Wright
Whirlwind, as are installed in the
Ford-Stout tri-motored plane in which
the students will be taken up Satur-
day. This plane is the sister ship of
the one Byrd will use on 'his South
Pole flight this summer, and also of
the plane which Floyd Bennett flew
to Quebec.
It is through the co-operation and
courtesy of the Ford Airport that this
flight, including the ride to the hang-
ars at Dearborn and return, may be
taken for the exceedingly low cost
of $6.50. Those in charge of the flight
would appreciate having the women
who are interested in making the trip
call Wiliam Chase at 3818, before
Thursday at 5:30 p. m., to make their
reservations. They are asled to %igni-
fy their preference of taking the bus
which will leave from in front of the
Union at 8:30 a. m., returning at nonn,
or that making the trip at 1:00 p. M.,
returning about 5:00 p. m.

---------.----- ---'-- - -------------___---- -____. __.. ... .. ... -NAftfwm*wowe..

Lantern Night Plans
Are Now Completed
Spectators for Lantern night will
be seated on the bleachers, which willf
probably be placed running parallel
to the street as last year, and facing
the playing field. Groups may gather
wherever they wish and have supper,4
and then will follow the Freshman
Pageant.
After this the main event of the eve-
ning's program will take place, the
Lantern night ceremony. This event
is the symbolizing of the senior wo-
men going out into "the wide, wide
world," and handing their lighted lan-
terns to the juniors, who pass on their
flowered hoops to the members of the
sophomore class.
All women on campus may partici-
pate in this event, and in fact, they are
urged to take part in the anniversary
of one of Michigan's most beautiful
traditions.
BOSTON UNIVESITY-A drama-
tic workshop has been organized in
the school of Liberal Arts for the pro-
duction of original plays.

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4

Aq i %~'a A. --A

The entire cast for the Fresh-
man Pageant is required to be
present at an important rehears-
al, Saturday at 2 o'clock.

Freshmen will play Juniors a
sophomores will play seniors in t
interclass games tomorrow. Both
these games will start at 4 o'clock.

nd
he
of

Washington movies written, acted,
directed and produced by students
may become a reality, if motion pic-
ture plays projected by Professor Al-
bert R. Lovejoy head of the dramatic
art department materialize.

c

RIBBONS AND
SUPPLIES
for all makes of
TYPEWRITERS
Rapid turnover, fresh stock insures
best quality at a moderate price.
O. D. MORRILL
17 Nickels Arcade. Phone 6615.

FOR MOTHER
Lasting Gifts of Love

A Host of

Appealing and Attractive
for Mother's Day at

THE MARY LOUISE SHOP
Nickels Arcade

BLUE BIRD
Sandwich 'Shop
516 E. Williams
TABLES FOR LADIES
Counter and Booth Service
Try Our Malted 111k.............20c
Hlamberger Sandwich'.........10c
Dinners and Luncheons
Phone 9604

1T

11

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i, __ ,

_ -

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Reputation Sells
Frocks
Possessing all the snap
and style that is demand-
ed by the smart co-ed.
$975 and $ 149

...
* 5. 4
{ "
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a .

11

ALM
1
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G1ft Suggestions
FOR
MOTHER
MOTHER, WITH HER REFINED, CONSERVATIVE
TASTES, WILL APPRECIATE ANY OF THESE
CHARMING PERSONAL GIFTS, CHOSEN
ESPECIALLY FOR HER
Send your message of love to Mother with a lus-
cious box of Gilbert's chocolates, a white crepe chif-
fon scarf, a string of pearls, a brooch, a Moire
pouch bag, or a linen and lace handkerchief.
Just one pair of service weight hose or perhaps a box
of hose neatly wrapped will tell her that you think
of her today. At least remember her with a card-
S . - ; e '

11

I

11111 they set a very high stan

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