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January 14, 1928 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-01-14

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, JANUARY 14, 1928

4r Ir 31dgan au utgI
Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan,'as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail,
$4.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phones:tEditorial, 4925; Business 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
JO H. CHAMBERLIN
Editor.......... ....Ellis B. Merry
Editor Michigan Weekly. Charles E. Behymer
Staff Editor........... . .Philip C. Brooks
City Editor.............ourtland C. Smith
Women's Editor...........Marian L. Welles
Sports Editor. ............ Herbert E. Vedder
Theater, Books and Music.Vincent C. Wall, Jr.
Telegraph Editor............. Ross W. Ross
Assistant City Editor.. . Richard, C. Kurvink
Night Editors
Robert E. Finch G. Thomas McKean
J. Stewart Hooker Kenneth G. Patz ick.
Paul J. Kern Nelson J. Smith, Jr.
Milton Kirshbaum
Reporters
Esther Anderson Marion McDonald
Margaret Arthur Richard I H. Milroy
Emmons A. Bonfield Charles S. Monroe
ean Campbell Catherine Price
essie Church Harold L. Passman
Clarence N. Edelson Morris W. uinn
Margaret Gross Rita Rosenthal
Valborg Egeland Pierce Rosenberg
Marjorie Follmer Edward J. Ryan
James B. Freeman David Scheyer
Robert J. Gessner Eleanor Scribner
Elaine E. Gruber Corinne Schwarz
Alice Hagelshaw Robert G. Silbar
Joseph 1: Howell Howard F. Simon
J. Wallace Hushen Rowena Stillman
Charles R. Kaufman Sylvia Stone
William F. Kerby George Tilley
LawrenceFR. Klein Edward L. Warner, Jr.
Donald J. Kline Benjamin S. Washer
Sally Knox Leo J. Yoedicke
Jack L. Lait, Jr. Joseph Zwerdling
John H. Maloney
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
WILLIAM C. PUSCH
Assistant Manager...Gebrge H. Annable, Jr.
Advertising..............Richard A. Meyer
Advertising..............Arthlur M. Hinkley
Advertising...............Edward L. Hulse
Advertising............. John W. Ruswvinckel
Accounts..................Raymond Wachter
Circulation..............George B. Alin, Jr.
Publication,........ ...Harvey Talcott
Assistants

George Bradley
Marie Brumler
James 0. brown
James Carpenter
James B. Cooper
Charles K. Correll
Barbara Cromell
Mary Dively
Bessie V. Egeland
Ona Felker
Katherine Frohne
Douglass Fuller
Beatrice Greenberg
Helen Gross
E. J. Hammer
Carl W. Hammer
Ray Hotelich

Hai A. Jaehn
ames Jordan
TIarion Kerr
Thales N. Lenington
Catherine McKinven
W. A. Mahaffy
Francis D. Patrick
George M. Perrett
Alex K. Scherer
Frank Schuler
George Spater
Wilbert Stephenson
Ruth Thompson
Herbert E. Varnum
Lawrence Walkley
Hannah Wallen

favor of increasing production above
all else.
Mrs. Sherman's plea seems to be for
a "square deal," a thing to which
under the Smith-Lever law the farm
women are entitled. Mrs. Sherman
would probably be more successful as
a politicain, however, if she would
produce a definitely organized plan
stating just what she wants the agri-
culture committee to do about it.
Evidently the house committee needs
more than eloquent persuasion in the
case of the welfare of farm women.
AIR COLLEGES
The Federal Radio commission is to
be commended for its recent decision
approving of fair treatment for college
radio broadcasting stations in regard
to adjustments of wave lengths and
power in case of interference with
their programs. While the decision
does not directly affect the Univer-
sity, whose Michigan Night programs
are fast gaining prestige in the radio
world, as exemplified by the increas-
ing number of communications re-
ceived by the local station, it is im-
portant, nevertheless, in that the com-
mission realizes the good effects of
this phase of air activity.
For the most part college radio
stations cater very largely to the rural
element with their educational pro-
grams, and it is chiefly in this respect
that they are doing the most good, the
commission believes. As a result of
this approbation by the radio com-
mission more than 20 land grant col-
leges in the United States will be en-
couraged to continue their work of
sending out farm and other extension
programs. Evidence of the educa-
tional goods these stations are doing
is contained in a letter recently re-
ceived by the commission from the
secretary of agriculture, who asked
that they be looked upon favorably
because of the splendid service they
are rendering the more isolated
listeners.%
Broadcasting of Michigan Night pro-
grams every other Friday night during
the past two years has served to
permanently establish the University
as one of the foremost of the air col-
leges in the country. While no defi-
nite courses are given or any specific
educational program followed, appre-
ciation of the worth of the programs
has been expressed in the increasing
number of letters received from dis-
tant points. ,
Everything considered, it is obvious
that the Federal Radio commission
has taken a thoroughly judicious step
in seeking to further such important
factors in the cause of education as
the college radio stations scattered
throughout the country.
PAY UP
Next Tuesday and Wednesday the
annual effort will be made to collect
class dues from the various classes
of the University. A large number of
students, no doubt, will pay their
dues without needing any encourage-
ment, and some will pay if pursused;
but some there will be, as some there
always are ,who will successfully at-
tempt to evade payment altogether.
None of the dues will be excessive,
running in no class to more than
$1.00 except in the cases of senior
classes and in cases where excep-
tional expenditures have been decided
upon. Every student attending the
University can afford to pay this
small rate which is requested of hi,
and there is no reason why the vari-
ous classes cannot show a better rec-
ord this year than they have in the
past.

The collection of these dues is no
small task for the various class treas-
urers who have to make a report of
every dollar taken in to the treasurer
of the University. Cooperation on the
part of the students can lessen this
burden immensely, and it can also
improve the reputation of the Univer-
sity student body in regard to the
honorable payment of its dues.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
It is with extreme gratification, and1
a feeling closely akin to pride, that
the University may view the appoint-
ment of Prof. Thomas Reed of the
political science department as ad-'
viser to the city of Pittsburgh in a
post which will ultimately call upon
him to reorganize that city's govern-
ment.
Seldom has the standing and repu-
tation of our own political science de-
partment been brought more forcibly
into relief than it is in this recent ap-
pointment; and it is with complete

COMES
BACK
A cold wind blew as we strolled I
down to the campus yesterday morn-
ing. But we remained comfortably
warm, for we had just read Assistant-,
to-the-Dean Emery's pleasant remind- j
er that the auto ban is still with us.
* * *
The announcement was something
of a surprise. While we were con-
fident that the rules and their en-j
fnottlftr nt 11 l it 71101l h n

THEATER
BOOKS
MUSIC

TO7I 1':: The Himes present
"Seventi Heaven" in their theater at
8:30 o'clock.
* * *
THE ST. OLAF LUTHERAN CHOIR
It is primarily due to the genius of
F. Melius Christausen that the St. Olaf
1 Lutheran choir has reached the art-

Unei School ofMusic
Second Semester Begins Feb. 6
Degree and Certificate Courses for those who are
Candidates for Graduation
GENERAL COURSES FOR SPECIAL STUDENTS
EARL V. MOORE, MUSICAL DIRECTOR

l

tor'ement are noy flititl'V I anJL haj JImig tineIjLkL beU '"' i'' V ' 'a-
desired by its founder still we were istic pinnacle which it now occupies.
not aware that the ban had dropped Starting in a small mid-western de-
such a negligible position that it nominational college, unknown and
should be necessary to devote a whole without tradition or background, Mr.
column of The Daily to an explanation Christiansen has developed an organ-
that it was still existent. ization which is unique of its kind.
.et .ij. hs ewsHe has as his only asset a strange,
''Everythig is just the same," was skill for developing and assembling
the text of the message of the tIniver- comparatively untrained voices, and
sity's chief prohibition officer. But '.P .d vocs n
blending them into a finished product
~ince all his superiors in rank have that has an enviable value on the pro-
successfully dodged the question of fessional music market.
the purpose of the regulations, we
As a group) of college students
could hardly expect its head enforce- whose interest cannot be confined
ment officers to break odt with any wholly to that work alone, the choir
original comments upon the subject. wholy ta ahieved asond, ue-
* * *itself has achieved astounding suc-
MUSIC IIATI CHARMS TO cess. Critics in America and in Eur-
SOOTHE THE SAVAGE BREAST ope have credited them with the most
remarkable group singing for any
When a knight of 01(1 wanted to amateur body. In the professional
win the heart of a lady fair, his surest field they have several formidable ri-
technique, outside of slaughtering a vals-the English Singers, the Rus-
regiment of Saracens or a herd of sian Cossack choir and some others of
dragons, was by the use of music. lesser note. But in spite of this the
When our Hebrew forefathers felt St. Olaf choir has gained a reputation
they had sinned, their best defense of being probably the foremost ex-
was to break out in hymns to the ponent of capella singing of classical
Messiah. religious music which this country
* * * 1jhas produced. Their Ann Arbor ap-
Music has fgrever represented the pearance this season is on Thursday,
ultimate in human expression. Jan. 26, in Hill auditorium as the
S * i fourth number in the Extra Concert
And so ine the lon tt } series. The final concert in that series

BYRI FOX BA{ICER, Solfegglo
F NN ('A IS'N , Sociology
PAUNE LI Organ
DONNA E;SSELSiTYN, Pin'
N IC.I4)LAS FALCONE, Band Instruments
MARI ST lIUBLE F IREEMAN, Violin
I.1'ILE GIII GAAM"Piano
JA M HA I IllTl'ON, Voice
Ti. E"O DO R E 11 AR RIISON, Voice
XVVA HIGBEE, Methods
R 1. TID. IIOLLISTER, Public Speaking
NRA CIA N HUNT, Voice
('A NiMWU JlOLLEY, Sohieggio
G(.RACE ,011NSON JiONOLD, Voice
EDITH KOON. Piano
ALB ElIT LO6( IWOOI, Piano
SAMdFEL 'IRISON LOCKWOOD, Violin

GLENN MeGEOCH, History
MARGA RE T 31acG R EGOR, Organ
JOSEPII E. 'AD1)Y, Methods
GUY 1AIER Piano
LOIS )AIER, Piano
M RTHA )ElKIE, 'Pan o
1AU D OKELBERG, Piano
LILA PARG)ENT, French
H A NNS 'PICK, 'Cello
MABEL OSS RHEAlD, Piano
LEON SLATER, PNyclologry
HELEN SNYDER, Rhetoric
OTTO I. STAhL, Piano and Theory
NELL B. STOCK WELL, Piano
MAY A. STRONG, Voice
WALTER WELKE, Mefhods
NORA B. WETMORE, Voice
ANT ONY J. WHIT3IIRE, Violin


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For further information please address,
CHARLES A. SINK, President

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SATURDAY, JANUARY 14, 1928
Night Editor-K. G. PATRICK
BUILDING VERSUS SAVING
In an article published recently, the
official journal of the American Med-
ical association commented on the sit-
uation now prevailing in a majority of
universities whereby , a student is
furnished medical attention when sick.
The comment took the form of a ques-
tion as to the propriety of the service
to the sick as a university function.
Dr. Warren E. Forsythe, director of
the University Health Service, in his
last report, mentioned one instance
of a student being cared for by the
Health Service to the extent of $1,200
in fees. This is paid by the tuition
appropriation under the policy now
in vogue, and in this one case the en-
tire amount taken from 120 students
was necessary.
Dr. Forsythe declares . that the
present day problems of public health
are essentially personal rather than
group matters, and that this factor
makes it impossible to, separate the
preventive and the curative medicalj
measures. Despite the demand for
and the appreciation of direct service
of a curative nature in the case of
recognized illness, the constructive
health program is less able to be re-
alized on this account. It is the be-
lief of the present administration that
a constructive health program is both
desirable and necessary, and for this
reason the possibility that such a
movement is being jeopardized by
curative measures is worthy of con-
sideration and remedy. It is possible
that a certain moderation of the
present system might be invoked,
which would transfer to the state or
to private responsibility the cost of
caring for a student after a certain
stage of treatment is reached.
LADY POLITICIANS
This week the General Federation
of Women's clubs with its president,
Mrs. John D. Sherman, as a leader,
is working in Washington for the
cause of the women of the farms.
Mrs. Sherman charges that the fed-
eral agricultural extension service;
discriminates against the development
of the farm home and training of farm
workers in favor of programs for in-
creasing agricultural surplus and de-
clares that the leaders of 2,000,000j

Hio Z , slau L1 1 Lg Le Q
prayer of student organizations for a;
logical excuse for the automobile
rules has been completely ignored,
what could be more appropriate than
an attempt to pierce the official
armour with a musical plea?
* * *
Accordingly, for the use of anyone
wishing to try such a method, we
have composed a little ditty, to be{
sung like the well-known army tune,1
"I Can't Get 'Em Up."
* * *
OUR REVEILLE
We can't get a rise,
We can't get a rise,
We can't get a rise from the
Regents;
They won't answer us,
They won't answer us,
They won't answer us at all.
The Regents point to the Pres-j
ident,
The President points to the
Regents;
They tell us it's all for our wel-
fare,
But they won't answer us at all.
* * *
A mixed quartet from the interfra-
ternity council, singing this little
song near the Law building while the
Regents and President are in session
ought to produce some action, al-
though we are not sure of what sort'
it would be.
w* *
HOCKEY TEAM1 FACES
RADICAL IMPOVEMENT
With three of its last four scheduled
games cancelled, Michigan's hockey
team is having much better luck this
season than the basketball squad.
* * *
If the weather mast, or some other '
liar, doesn't order ice for the hockey
team to play on, Coach Lowrey will

is on Feb. 13, when Myra Hess, pianist,
will present a recital.
-E. M. M.
"CRADLE SNATCHERS"
The second bill of the Rockford
Players who open a week from Sun-
day night in the Whitney theater for a j
season of stock will be Norma Mit-
chell's tremendously successful com-
edy, "Cradle Snatchers." This is al-
most unique of its kind, since it is
one of the few comedies of crude,
slapstick proportions, and almost in-
decent, which has attained popularity
and is appreciated by everyone from
the school teachers who saw it in the
Rockford Players summer session
here,.to the New York literati who
greeted it with whoops of laughter
when Edna May Oliver and Mary Bo-
land opened with it two seasons ago.
* * *
.."UPLANDS," by Mary Ellen Chase;
297 pages; 1927; Little, Brown and
(o, $2.00. An Atlantie Monthly Press
PublicltiOnl.
A review, by Kenneth G. Patrick
Delicately and a little too charm-
ingly spun is this tale of the North
Dorset pastures, but its influence
grows gradually upon the reader as
he sticks to his task. The reading
itself must be accomplished in a calm
spirit of experiment and patience, or
else it is apt never to proceed past the
first 30 pages. The authoress, a Maine
Ph.D. and at present an assistant
professor of English at Minnesota
seems to possess a few weapons with 1
which she is skilled, and she con-
veniently desists from all attempts to
use the others--a virtue all too often
lacking.
Plot is hardly an issue from-cover
to cover; indeed it hardly seems to
concern any of the three or four
principal characters themselves. They
are rather content to make their way

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Betsy Ross or Johnstons
FINE BOXED CANDIES
FI' Drop in and look over our special packs for
- - '#V d y J-HOP OR VALENTINE DAY
- -
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haze to start training his warriors on through the story slowly and in the
roller skates. approved Atlantic Monthly style,
* * * Their charm lies in the paths they
Hockey games on the basketball pick for their wanderings and the
floor in the field house would be some- thoughts which are begun under the
thing new. At least the spectators I trees. Martha, a parish orphan, grows
would have a warm place to sit. up in the service of a New England
* * * Protestant lady whose chief concern
The judges would have to sit on the is the saving of souls. She becomes
backboards to tell when scores were enamored of a farm boy who lives in
made. A high puck shot would stand the neighborhood, and together they
a good chance of knocking the judg- seek to find their way out of the bleak
ment out of a judge, and felling him and conflining uplands where they
to the floor. This would give the ap- have been starved and deprived of any
pearance of a collegiate way of play- life-fullness. They even essay a
ig "Duck on the Rock." ( timid marriage, but Jarvis is killed
* * * in an accident before any other has
A hockey team on roller skates I been let in on the secret and the old
would not be so very much different order is restored for a time with the
from our basketball team. It has had surroundings becoming more oppres-
the skids under it, too, for the past sive than ever. A second break for
week. liberty is effected through the aid of
Tom Iiatz. Colin, an Irish lad destined to become
* * *a priest-much to the shock of th

10DAY ONLY
HOOT GIBSON
Ill
"PRAIRIE KING"
(Not a Society Play)
Sunda y-IlE - in
"TREl DEIL I (RSE"
RAE -
Everyday brings an
avalanche o new
and fascinating
books
You can only keep
pace with the times
by buying discrlml-
natingly'
Our specialty is
to serve discriminat-
ing customers.
Have you seen
the latest?

I

bWashing
WITHOUT hands
The old-time washday,
with its tired hands and
aching muscles is pass-
ing out of the calendar.
Millions of women are now
letting electricity do their
washing. The Electric Washer
does in minutes what used
to take hours to do -.-and
does it well.
Electric washing saves
money, too. Onepenny's
worth of current will run
an electric washer for 50
minutes. You may pay
for your washer in small
instalments if you wish.

I

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confidence that Professor Reed will
achieve a distinct success in his new
undertakinz that the Univercity tup k

U LC4Lt~tg vtt1 LtCL 1Yi L ~Ps :jlltL llu~lL Lt at l Us ie
this opportunity to congratulate him ORI WHAT A PARTY! hide-bound Protestant community.
on his mission. With our genial President, eight But this is successful only when it
Regents, eleven Deans, one Assistant brings childbirth hand in hand with
A scientist says the next war will Dean, The Assistant-to-the-Dean, not death. And the story is over.
be with insects. We hope, then, it will to mention other respectable person- Probably the most valuable contri-
come early enough so that some of ages, all expected to attend the J-Hop, bution in the work is description of
the veterans of the last war can lend it looks like a big night for the auto a lonely mind, wandering between the
..,41-,:a -0 .-.. -. . t--- - a . - lonhn "I-' ely -1mi .n1, - wandering - _between

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