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January 14, 1928 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-01-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SA TUT)AY, JANUARY 14, 1928.

THE MICHIGAN, DAILY'

PAULTIIEEN'

THE MIHIGAN AILY ' -G1. rlR. -

RHODES SCHOLARSHIP APPOINTEES
FIOM SOUTH GET SPECIAL MENTION'
CHANGES IN TYPE OF
PRESENT DAY LAVING

VISION OF FUTl'URE PIESEN\TED
BY MAN 'A IIEI GAS
O 1"TICIAI4S
FIVE DIFFERENCES GIVEN
Priohibition Of Burning Coal In Crude
Stiate, A d Atmosphere Freed
Of D1irt Is Predicted

All Shoes Reduced
FOR OUR
JANUARY
CLEARANCE

. ... .../

Five distinct changes in matters of #
domestic and civic importance con-!F
situte the "picture ahead" which is
being presented by executives of the
manufactured gas industry for the
consideration of the American people. Willim Everett 1erryerry. Tomas J Iamilto, Jr.
Homes artificially cooled in the Among those who recently received appointments to Rhodes scholarships
summer and automatically heated in the two Southern boys received special mention by the judges. William
winter; the substitution for i-e of re- Everett Derryberry, left, is a star athlete and student of the University of
frigerating machines utilizig gas heat; Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn., and was described by the judges as a man
universal adoption of the temperature "whose like we never have seen before." Thomas J. Hamilton Jr., right, is
method of cooking food; prohibition of beli, ved to be the youngest ever to gain a Rhodes scholarship to Oxford uni-
the burning of coal in the ra ate; V itfrom the United States. Hamilton, a senior at the University of
tnebaninpotatmosptherefref eorgia is 18. Under the present regulation no one may enter Oxford until
and an unpolluted atmosphere free.of lie is 19. Hamilton's birthday is on Sept. 20-and he will enter Oxford on Oct.
smoke, ashes, soot, and grime com-
plete the plans which are being
visioned for the near futuik by gas
experts.
Househeating by gas is already
firmly established. ]figures made pub-
lic recently by the American Gas as-
sociation indicate that approximately
5,2,000,000 persons in the United States
are served by gas in some form while
a large portion of this number already
have gas heated homes.
However, the introduction of house-
heating on a huge scale without a
compensating load would bring with
it engineering problems of a serious -
nature. It is this situation which has
caused the gas engineer to investigate
other fields, notably refrigeration and
artificial cooling of homes.
Types On Market
At the present time, there are two
types of gas-fired refrigerating ma-
chines on the market. These are the
adsorption and the absorption types.
Both work equally well with gas fuel,
the operation being noiselss as com-
pared with other machines and the
cost of maintenance and upkeep be-
ing less than other types operated by
electricity. Gas-fired ice machines
are being developed for sale by gas
companies and there is a steadily
growing demand for them.
One engineer who is a specialist on
gas refrigeration states that homes
in a few years will use gas as an ideal
cooling agent in summer as they use

Wahr' s

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Downtown

108 S. Main

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it for a heating medium during the
winter months.
Here, he says, is a potential load
which, when added to the load built
up by gas-fired machines, will offset
the heavy househeating peaks and put
the gas industry in a position where
it can give the public all the gas it
needs.
Leaders of the industry believe in
a coming era of effective conserva-
tion of all natural resources and effi-
cient and economical use of the pub-
lie service. They forsee the time not
only when oil will be reserved for
purposes of transportation but also
when the burning of raw fuel of any
kind, including coal, will be forbidden.I
Predict Coal Prohibition i
It is their conviction that the neces-
sity for conservation, together with
the growing sense of the economic
waste and the loss of health and effi-
ciency as a result of smoke will result
in prohibition of the burning of coal
by the individual. Experts estimate
that perhaps 70 per cent of the poten-
tial efficiency of coal is wasted in the
average home and anywhere from 25j
to 75 per cent in industrial plants..
The use of gas in industry is also
showiing a remarkable growth where
a few years ago gas engineers were
proud to announce that their product
was used in 1,000 different heating
applications. Recently the list was
revised to include 5,000 uses, and the
latest estimate is from an English
engineer who says that more than
21,000 trade processes are now being
carried out with the aid of gas.
During the next 10 years it is esti-
mated on the basis of past demands
that the gas industry will requires
$2,000,000,000 to meet growing de-
mands for service.
According to a recent estimate,
American homes consume annually
65,000,000 tons of bituminous and 70,-
000,000 tons of anthracite coal. It is
believed that one-fourth of this could
be supplanted economically by gas,
the total amount needed for this pur-
pose being 1,000,000,000,00 cubic feet,
or nearly two and one-half times the
present yearly sales of gas companies.j
WILL PUBLISH BOOKLET.
FEATURING AUDITORIUM
Hill auditorium h s been selected
as the feature of the next Chamber of
Commerce booklet which will be dis-
tributed as part of the campaign to
advertise Ann Arbor throughout the

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an wai
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The Famous
SHELLEY
li Suits
Designed for the most exacting
trade. Tailored from
foreign fabrics.
$3"PI7

Il

A Store-Wide Sale
Iniding TuxeoSTopcoas, Imported and
Domestic Haberdashery at
Irresistible Prices

Mt. Rock Fieee
OVERCOATS
Michigan's finest overcoat. famous
for its wear. Blue and
grey.
$39e75

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Irish Poplin,
Hand Framed
English Knits,
Finest Repps,
Foulard and
Mogadore
NECKWEAR
$1.15 and up

CUSTOM BUILT
SHIRTS
Any shirt in our stock-white
or colored-values
to $5.00

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$ 45

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Terms. ALL Sales Cash
A $10 Deposit Required
Oan All Suits Before
.Altering.

p.

THE BYRON
T UXEDO
A strictly 1928 model as pre-
sented by leading Eastern
Custom Tailors.
$2 A

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No Goods On Approval
No Exchanges
We Charge for All
Alterations.

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state.
Picture s of the exterior and interior
of the building, and schedules of con-
certs and oratorical programs are
contained in the publication. The
booklet also will contain a letter con-

14

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