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March 10, 1928 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-03-10

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SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 1928

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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SORORITIES INTEREST
DEANS AT CON VENTION~
Miss Richards Reports Unique Plan
In Force At University 01
Pittsburgh
ANNUAL BANQUET HELD
Among the outstanding features of
the annual convention of deans of !
women held Feb. 27 through . March
1 in Boston was the Pan-Hellenic
Congress which met there as well.
Miss Grace Richards, adviser to
women, visited the morning session
of the Congress Feb. 29 to find them
discussing such interests as sorority
standards, particularly with regard
to scholarship requirements, the fea-
sibility of pledges being assisted by
tutors rather than. upperefass wo-
men, and the recommendation that
any pledge who failed to become eli-
gible by the end, of the third quarter,
in a quarter system, should be auto-
matically dropped and not eligible to
repledging.f
Although the discussion was of in-
terest, no particular conclusions
were arrived at. "A more pertinent
contribution to Pan-Hellenic was
made at the joint session of National
Pan-Hellenic with the deans on
Thursday afternoon when Miss Helen
Rush, assistant to the dean of wo-
men, University of Pittsburg, spoke
on "Sororities in the Building of
University Spirit," Miss Richards
stated.
At Pittsburgh they realized that
they must create university spirit
and one effort was made in fostering
a closer relationship with the sorori-
lies. A committee was formed of
three faculty women, the dean of
women, and the assistant to the dean
who meet once a month with the
presidents of the sororities.
In the question or rushing all so-
rorities have agreed that no rushing
be done until the end of the first se-
mester and they have simplified rush-
ing rules to one: "Girls shall con-
duct themselves as if there were no
sororities on the campus." They also
have an interesting development in
the matter of penalties for breaking
that rule.
They do not impose restrictions;
they define tasks. For example, one
sorority which overstepped bounds
was required to present a paper on
the improvement of spirit in Pan-
Hellenic. This paper was read at
Pan-Hellenic meeting and led to such
discussion that a series of papers fol-
lowed.
Important among the social affairs
according to Miss Richards, was the
annual Columbia Teacheirs' College,;
dinner Wednesday, Feb. 29. Places
were laid for 1500. "Although the af-
fair has now grown beyond all
bounds, it has always been a great
inspirational treat," Miss Richards
remarked.

"Americans Hide Themselves But Are
Sympathetic," Says Colonel Lindsey'

"In no country is sincerity so quick
to be appreciated as in the United
States," said Col. Fred Lindsey, who
is at the Majestic theater this week, il-
lustrating the various methods of
u'sing the Australian stock whip as he
has learned to use it through years
of experience on his father's stock
ranch in Australia.
"You Americans have a strange
philosophy," he continued. "You all
have a 'line' that helps in hiding your
real individuality. You hide your-
selves in copying each other. You
dress alike; you talk of the same
thing's that every one does. And you
all do the same things. You seem to
be afraid to let anyone get under the
surface at the real 'you.' Yet under it
all you have, it seems to me, a keen
quick. sympathy and admiration for
sincerity that is equalled in no other
country."
The Olthe, athletic figure of the
colonel leaned forward as he con-
tinued. "This is an age when chiv-
alry should flourish," he said. "There
nrn cn. v . iv _ -, 'Ari c f i

The world isn't at all as it used to
be, don't you know?"
Australia, says Colonel Lindsey is
a peaceful country, as large as the
United States, but with approximately
5,000,000; people in it. Both the coun-
try itself and the climate are much
like California. "The people are
generous and hospitable," he said with
a smile, "and are 'inclined rather to
pity the rest of the world for lacking
the privilege of living in that portion
of the British empire called Australia.
Practically the whole of the country
is in ranch lands-'momba ranches'
we call them,-and the average ranch
covers territory 60 miles wide by 100
miles long. There's a romance about
the land and a picturesqueness that
I try to portray in the using of Aus-
tralia's national weapon, the stock
whip."
During the great war, Col. Lindsey
was colonel of a Scotch regiment; and
has seen service as well, in the South
African and Zulu wars. His appear-
ance on the stage, said Col. Lindsey,
was due to a wager with friends in
E~sr A lhri affn i- rsr

TENNIS CHAMPION
TO DESIGN SILKS!
What will Helen Wills' ultimate'
bid for fame be? Besides beingf
America's foremost woman tennis
player, she has already m'ade a name
for herself in several other fields.1
How many people know that she was
the originator of the visor cap? When
Helen Wills walked onto the courts
oftho Rivior cunin 1 hit hor1

SP O R T-S
Daily Bulletin of Sportswomen

NOTICES
IMPORTANT TO JUNIOR WOMEN
There will be a rehearsal of chorus
1, parts 2 and 3, at 1 o'clock today in
Sara Caswell Angell hall.

Says Women's Love
For Golf Increases
"An idea of the interest developing
in Golr may be obtained," said Miss

BASEBALL CONTESTS

TO START MARCH

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Contrary to the headline which
appeared in the Sports column
I yesterday stating, that Martha
Cook was the winner of the
championship bout at the Penny
Carnival, Group I was the vic-
torious team. The final score
was 41 and 23.

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of te xivieira wear ng a wn'e t1eati1M oUl
band with a cloth bound eyeshade, Ethel McCormick, University golf i- Intramural baseball players will
she set a stye for tennis, golf, s tructor, wen one considers the swing into action immediately, with
Siase- number of women on the campus,ng
ball, truck driving, newspaper sell- who are taking golf without credit. tournament to be played off on Mon-
ing, vegetable vending, ice hauling, In my classes with an enrollm-ent of day, March 12. Two afternoon hours
and other summer diversions. 80 nearly one half of those parti- and one evening hour every day have
Now she is working on designs for cipating in practice are doing so only been set aside to play the games.
silk, which will be worn by the well because of their desire to play a bet- Twenty-two organizations have en-
dressed woman this summer. She has ter game." tered teams in the competition and
conceived five patterns, two of the Instruction in golf for women at have paired off for contests to be
flower type, one patriotic figure, and the University of Michigan has been 'staged during the next week. The re-
two in the world of sport. One of given only within the last two years, suits of these games will determine
these latter, "A Game of Tennis," as but with the completion of the Wo- the teams to be divided into the regu-
it is called, is just what the name men's Athletic building more exten- lar A and B tournament.
implies. She has transferred to silk sive provision for indoc r classes has It is expected that the games this
a young woman, herself or Suzanne been made. spring will be even keener than those
Lenglen possibly, in all the various At present, the class equipment just completed in the basketball
phases 'a the game. The other,, consists of practice cages, each ac- tournament, due to the larger number
"Rackets and Balls," is a represen- commodating two players. The sec- of candidates turning out for positions
tation of the implements used in ten- tions are partitioned by nets sus- on the various squads. The aspirants
nis worked out in a design. These pended from the ceiling on rollers, include sme of the best athletic ma-
silks are proving very popular, and thus n1aking the room available when terial in the physical education depart-
are bringing Miss Wills added pres- necessary for other games as arch- ment and many capable players who
tige as an artist. cry. At the end of each booth tar- have gained experience at other
gets are placed for practice in direct- schools or camps.
AUTO-MECHANICS COURSESThe scg rives. Those not wishing The schedule of games to be played
practice are provided with moving follows:
ARE OPENED 'OtWOMEN!icture studies of famous golf cham- o0o'cs
pions. After sufficient practice in- Ade4ia'clock: Ap at GammclDckt
Women rushing to eight o'clocks' in doors players are given first hand s Adelia Cheever; at 5 o'clock:
grimy .overalls will soon become a practice on the University Golf Betsy Barbour vs. Alpha Phi; Tue's-
common sight on the Michigan State course.Kpday at 4 o'clock: Phi Gamma Mu vs.
campus; a two hour course in auto Mrs. Stewart Hanley, State Woman I 1lartha Cookvs. Hillel foundation; at

All the members of Act 'I and II,
both cast and chorus, will meet at 7:30
o'clock, tonight, at Barbour gymna-
sium for practice.

imamammanama

are so many more dragons to e i ingiant snortuy altern is program
killed''since the war than ever before. here has been finished.
LEAGUE PLANS TO LAY ISOCIAL WORKERS
CORNERSTONE MARCH 29 WILL BE TRAINED
March 29 has been definitely decid- As practical experience to give a
ed on as the date of the laying of the background for social work among
cornerstone of the new Women's factory girls, a number of college
league building, it was announced ye's-a women frm Ohio State will spend six
terday. The program will be entirely wen f ctualinstrial work in
in the hands of undergraduate women, weeks in actual industrial work in
with Elizabeth Nutt, '28, president oC. Those who in-
the league in charge. tend to do later work in industrial
Progress is being made in the con- circles will make up the group.
struction of the building and the last Each student will find her own
contract for work has been awarded. rooming house, and will not be per-
__ntrt__rw____a___e mitted to live with relatives or
friends; neither can they live inj
h uses which do not regularly accom-
WILL ATTEMPT CHANNEL modate industrial girls. As most of
the positions secured bring barely
Laddie Sharp of Bristol, England, enough for living expenses, wages
a powerful girl swimmer expects to will be pooled to allow for unemploy-
make a try to beat Gertrude Ederle's ment and less than a living wage.
English channel swimming record and Group meetings will be held weekly to
win a prize of $25,000 offered for im- discuss problems and to hear noted
proving the American girl's time. speakers in this field.
The money prize has been offered
by an American film company, which NEW YORK-Professional women
'stipulates that the swim shall be golfers are not common, but one of
under 'proper newspaper supervision.' those who have been given charge of
Miss Sharp who is 17 years old, be- teaching golf at a large club is Miss
lieves she will accomplish the difficult Elizabeth M. Gordon of Providence,
channel crossing during the coming R. I., professional at the Acoaxert
season. Country club. Like many other pro-

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imechan'ics Dias been started under
the engineering department at the
petition of 15 girls. T'he class has
been limited to these 15 so that the
students may learn from first hand
experience how to reline breaks, sol-
der vacuum tanks, and whatever else
a garage man-and woman-does.

Got champion, spends much time on
the course here, hoping to make wo-
men more interested in the game andt
to develop the desire for participa-
tion in championship matches.
When asked if there were any qual-
ities players must possess to become,
relatively good players, Miss Mc-

8 o'clock: Group 1 vs. Delta Delta
Delta. Wednesday at 4 o'clock: Del-
ta Gamma vs. Kappa Delta; 5 o'clock:
Zeta Tau Alpha vs. Alpha Epsilon
Phi; 7:30 o'clock: Chi Omega vs. Del-
ta Zeta; Friday at 4 o'clock: Pi Beta
Phi vs. Alpha Omicron Pi; 5 o'clock:
Alpha Xi Delta vs. Group II.

The women are planning to do Cormick said, "Golf requires much -
everything with their special train- 'stick toit tiveness' and good coordi- CORNELL -Alumni of the univer-
ing from touring China in a $15 Ford, nation of mind and muscles. One sity have formed a corporation for
to running a repair station on a pop- needs to be patient because playing i the purpose of erecting a new motion
ulous downtown corner. one day is not the same as on others. picture theater.
So'm'ething may be troubling the _
Perfume manufacturers offer nov- player which prevents him playing
elties to the public just like any so accurately as on previous days."
other firm does. Their latest is a Women's interest in the game, Miss JU ILLER ET S I
perfume that is recommended as be- McCormick states, depends upon two a5 I
ing especially suited for use on win- things, "A'great many women take up j 302 S. State Dial 5860
ter furs. They claim that it has all golf for the joy of the game itself.
the charm of novelty and distinc- ! yet, there are some who are inter-
tion. ested only in their partners. The I
-- - attitude of the woman player has its Almonds, Pinaleos,
OREGON STATE COLLEGE-Nina effect on iher masculine partner, no
McCord, a senior, taught school, car- doubt. He may be all interest at the Pecans, Pistachios,
ed for lambs on a sheep ranch, wash- second hole but by the time the sixth
ed dishes, and took a correspondence is reached he has changed consider- Cashews, Jumbos
course in vocational education last ably, unless his partner is able to
school year. give him a good game." After Shows,

. 11

Agnes Uses
The Tailored Bow--
For this hat which has
taken Paris and New York
by storm.
The millinery made for
afternoon is more elaborate
--more feminine. Glossy
straw linen-like Sisol Straw
or Menatti Straw fashions
the varied shapes but uni-
formly chic Vogue hats.
Those in the newest ship-
ment range in price from
$5.00 $15.00
"The Shop of
Personal Service"

MONTE CARLO-A smashed hand
may end the tennis career of Miss
Elizabeth Ryan, one of America's
foremost women tennis players. Miss
Ryan injured her hand by catching it
in the door of a railroad compart-
ment. Surgeons are considering the
advisability of amputating one fin-
ger.
BUFFALO, N. Y.-Eleanor Holm, aI
14 year old swimmer, proved to be
the sensation of the women's nation-
al A. A. U. meet, when she made a
new world's record in the medley.

fessionals, Miss Gordon learned to!
play as a child near Glasgow, Scot-
land. She has held her position for
three years now.
UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS- TwoI
injured athletes at the University of
Kansas had a crutch race recent-
ly.

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Between Classes

First- Class
Shoe
P,epairing

Straw, Fabric and Felt
With Cellopham Trim

Norris

Gilbers

lj '" ''1.e ".A. L'/ ,B".r:'i'¬ęP.d.I"~d. IJJ11YJJl. .P' ' '' '.. l</. %.iS%./ll./1./.4d

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Pattern Hats

.rrd o4-o-or

The Print and Book Shop

Prints

Prints

Prints

Just received:
Etchings by Vienna Artists,
Etchings by Brovet, well-
known French Artist.

Thirty-fifth Annual
MAY FESTIVAL
HILL AUDITORIUM -:- ANN ARBOR
May 16, 17, 18, 19, 1928
SCHEDULE OF CONCERTS
1. WE DNESIDAY EVENING, MAY 16
Miscellaneous Artist Concert
Dedication of new Frieze Memorial Organ just completed by
the Skinner Organ Company at a cost of $75,000.
Margaret Maktzenauer Contralto
Palnmer Christian , Organ
Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Frederick Stock Conductor
Eric Delanlarter Guest Conductor

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Books

Books

Books

521 E. JEFFERSON STREET
Bridge Fashions
" " and every one a trump

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FARMERS AND MECHANICS BANK

Cornwell Blk. (Temp. lldqts.)

330 S. State Street

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If you have, at some time in your
life, met a necessary demand or
realized a heart's desire by means
of your savings account, you will
agree with us that it is a good policy
to lay aside a certain percent of
your income regularly.
IF YOU HAVE NOT HAD THE
EXPERIENCE LET US ADVISE YOU

2. THURSDAY EVENING, MAY 17
St. Francis of Assisi-Pierne
Narie 3Montana
Mlerle Alcock
Tudor Davieg
Raymund Koch
Chase Baromeo,
Chicago Symphony Orchestra
University Choral Union--Chlidren's Chorus
Earl V. Moore
3. FRIDAY AFTERNOON, MAY 1S
Children's Program
The Quest of the Queer Prince
Benno Rabinof
Children's Chorus and Orchestra
Frederick Stock
4. FRIDAY EVENING, MAY 18
Miscellaneous Artist Concert
Leonora Corona
University Choral Union
Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Frederick Stock
Percy Grainger Gue
5. SATURDAY AFTERNOON, MAY 19
Symphony Concert
Percy Grainier
Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Frederick Stock
6. SATURDAY EVENING, MAY 19
AIDA-Verdi
CAST OF CHARACTERS

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Soprano
"ontralto
Tenor
Baritone
Bass
onductor
Hyde
Violin
nducting
Soprano
onductor
onductor
Piano
onductor
Aida
Amneris
Radames
Amnasro

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We are presenting a specilal collection of bridge fashions that
will interest all women who attend luncheons, matinees, teas and
other informal occasions when a dressy dress is required. Designed
in the new feminine mode, with embroideries, tuckings, pleatings,
circular skirts, shirring and the new fagotting. Long sleeves, either
tight or loosely flowing. In sheer and printed crepes, crepe de Chine
and satin in every lovely spring color.
$14.75

C

Leone Kruse
Marguerite D'Alvarez
Paul Althouse
Mario Bnsiola

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