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January 05, 1928 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-01-05

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

T-TT1Utl'TD X, .TART'ATI .1, 1929l

C """PAGE, FIVE~

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STUDENT DTIN WOMAN OF INFLUE
{) )| | IO|| GENERATION TO SP
"Amongst English women of today
playing their parts in public life and

VCE WITH YOUNGER
EAK IN ANN ARBOR

leading great movements, destined

Cynthia Hawkins, '29, Believes Pur- powerfully to influence tne nation's
pose of Organization isfuture, there is probably not one more
- Worth While widely known or more influential, es-
pecially as regards the younger gen-
LEAGUE SYSTEM FAVORED eration, than Miss Royden," writes
Rev. W. Hudson Shaw of Miss Maude
"Though it will undoubtedly take Royden, who is to speak at a special
considerable time before the National Sunday convocation in Ann Arbor on
Student Federation of America fully Feb. 12.
accomplishes its aim-of organizing a Agnes Maude Royden, born in 1876
national student body with a con- and educated at Lady Margaret Hall,
sciousness of itself as an effective Oxford, has become famous for her
group which will function actively, I writings and speeches on the econce -
believe that the project is most worth ic, ethical, and religious aspects of
while," stated Cynthia Hawkins, '29, the women's movement. She has beet:
representative of the Women's league an Oxford University extension lee-
td the third annual convention of the turuer, a woman suffrage leader, edi-
Federation, held Dec. 15, 16, 17 at tor and agitator, preacher at the
Lincoln; Nebraska. City Temple, and is the founder of the
Miss Hawkins felt that the original New Fellowship.
purpose of the organization is al- \Vhefi \liss ltoytdeu concluded hen'
ready being realized in some measure, ;years of brilliant work at Oxford -ih-
that is, to work toward world peace. j decided upon a career of work for
It is claimed that the Federation im- the people and spent a year o" bard
presses upon its delegates, and and earnest labor in the slums as a
through them on the respective col- member of the University Set tletr,-eIt
leges, the need of world peace; one of at Liverpool. fluli her healthIi gave way
the Federation's most successful ven- under tlie straiin, and at the sugges-
tures, as pointeck out by Miss Ilawkins, tion of Rev. Shaw she became a sore
Is its sponsoring of student tour's ol qurasi-curate. At that time no ma;
with the Open Road. This has as its in iglaIand had dared to dream of
objective not mere sight seeing but woimen's miinistr nftions in the Church,
actual contact with students of foreign but. when lMiss Royden decided to 'rt
countries, who act as hosts to the the lcrime 1n the first step in an
visiting groups. The life and condi- ine(vitabile cnl ~5~ piml been I alen -
tions of these countries are studied It was a veritable b)ackwvater, w" -
and friendly relations st up. es Rev. Shaw; tihat Itiny village i i
In the discussion of student govern- Which INiss Royden took up her work.
ment at the convention, several factors ler dities, were mainly ceiuiected
prominent in the system under which with womniand children. although
the Women's league is now operating mot in Sunday School, for sh g drew
were given praise. The convention tho line at that. The children a w red
favored complete legislative, execu- her and withathe otdhers she haad
tive, and judicial power, such as are erandir ifence s he d
held by the Board of Directors, Board extraordinary influence. "I have dis-
of Rpreenttivs, ad Jdicarycovered in ni-y life only one true Dom-
of Representatives, and Judiciary ocrat, as whole-hearted almost in
Council of the League, and emphia-ie faith as St. F'ranicis of Assisi himself,
sized cooperation with the dean's of-
Tice.and that is Miss Maude Royden,"
The University of Missouri was writes Rev. Shaw. "She loved the
selected as the site of the next an-
nual' convention. The convention also AU H RSM H D
favored the establishment of a fixed REVEALED IN OLD
central office in New York so that
plans could be carried on steadily MANUSCRIPT COPY
during the year. The former plan saw ,---
much confusion as each president, Gabriel Wells, New York dealer in
who handled affairs, left school and rare books, has just purchased the
office. An executive 'secretary and originalnanuscript of Anatole
stenographer will be provided under
the present arrangement, and all France's "Thais."
business will be transacted by them. The 402-page document, all in the
England sent a representative to handwriting of the novelist, is a first
the Lincoln convention. draft of "Thais," varying considera-
bly from the final printer's copy
English Judge Says which is now in the Bibliotheque Na-
tionale in Paris.
High Prices Attract The manuscript throws interesting
light on Fra.nce's mthn di f wUi fk

poor folk, and never disdained her
cottage visiting, entering easily and
unaffectedly into all the simplicities
and the trials of the women of the
village, and always helpful to them.
They remember her still with affection.
"Still, sometimes I am horror-
stricken with myself for having in-
duced her to remain content so long
with so narrow an existence, bucolic
and dull and uneventful. Possibly the.
time was not wasted. She had quiet
and leisure and books, and was all"
unconsciously preparing for future
activities-her hard, busy, wearing
labors of the last filteen years for wo-
manhood, for education, for religion,
for a nobler social state. It was just
preparation time."
For Miss Royden, who hated Sun-!
days because of the long hours in
church and who said more than once
"I would have given worlds to have
ejected you from the lectern and read
that magnificent lesson myself, prop-
erly, was (lestiinled-- fourteen years
hence - to read the lessons r- lcr
erly - in a London church, whiile
Rev. Shaw listened meekly to leer
preachments.
There came a great discovery whiej
it was found that Miss Royden coil
not only recite Shakespeares 1)1
lron ivemory but was also a deep'y
read S'hakespearian schotar, armed
v it(h Colerid ge, Bradley, a id all the
rest, and able to discuss fully ail the
more diflicult problems. Aft (' a .lo
struggle, stlo ie(eved ahost on the
staff of extenlsioli lecturers or ox
ford University. ll thbose who (iouiit-
ed a woman's ability to perform such
work were instantly convinced, and
Miss Royden soon established a high
reputation all over England. Before
long she had far more invitations to
lecture than she could accept. In
three years she had become one of
the most acceptable speakers in the
land, and when she abandoned Ox-
:ord lecturing for the woman's suf-
frage platform she left a gap which'
has never since been filled.
Women's Influence
'On Peace Is Shown
At Stpy Congress

MEMBERSO OF PDTI&Abbot Deplores Lack
Diplomacy Among
UIOMMEIT O N UNOVtLS What the University needs as much
' as anything is a course in diplomacy3
and politeness, according to Prof.
"All sorts of books written by all Waldo M. Abbot of the rhetoric de-
sorts of authors in all sorts of ways," partment. "These qualities are as
was the summary made by Margaret much a part of general culture as a
Lyons, '28, in a review of the tenen- knowledge of letters and art," Profes-
sor Abbot remarked when interviewed
cies of the modern novel during the yesterday. "And if the University in-
last year given before Portia literary 'structors could import to the students

society Tuesday night.
A general movement toward the ro-
mantic, a wide range of subject mat-
ter, a nationalistic trend, and the al-
most total disappcarance of the vwar
novel were other characteristics men-
tioned.
Commenting on some of the out-
standing books of the year, the speak-
er spoke of the great va it ty of ('lar-
acters and the rich detail found in
Mazo de la loche's prizewinning
worli, ''Jaina" with its portraits of
-haracters ranging from tahe ,-year-
-Ad grandmother to the smallest mem-
'wr of the family at White Oaks.
W-illa Cather's "Death Comes to the
Archbishop" has been recommended
or its careful workman shlrip 1 XH I. L.
Men(ken wlIo believes, however, that
Miss Cather has written better books.
Another best seller having New
Mexico a's a hackgromi and giving a
vivacious, covincimg sketc-h of a lan
lete erine 11)toix-e a mans life was
'Wolf Srig' by harley Ferguson.

a courteous manner and an air of
breeding, they would be doing much
to make Michigan graduates more like
gentlemen.
"I do not wish to be misunderstood,"
Professor Abbot here interposed, "All,
th students are not discourteous, cer-
tainly. But some are, and these are
the ones who we do not take pleasure
in claiming as graduates of our Uni-
vx'rsity."
The lack of courte;y toward the'
chaperones at fraternity and other!
small dances is deplored by Professo
Abbot among other things. And at,
the large class dances. he observes
Hat the chaperones are thrown coin-
pletely into the background. not being
ilt i'OducC'( or presene itIfvos
The attitude seems to be: "The la p-
crones are paid by >eing invited to
come to the party: we don't owe them
ianything."
Conscion l aclt ol' focialIniceties,

Of Courtesy And
University Students
says Professor Abbot, is displayed
by some students in their classroom
conduct and in their consultations
with their instructors. "You see
many men stretching and yawning in
class, or sitting with their feet
propped on the benches in front of
them. Then they come up to you after
class and begin with a 'Say, Mr.
Abbot,' or 'Listen.' To correct such
speeches is, of course, within my prov-
ince as an instructor of rhetoric, but
there are many glaring social improp-
rieties which I cannot criticize with-I
out hurting the offenders' feelings."
It is far from complimentary to an
instruqtor, Professor Abbot believes,
for a student to come to him and say
that 1- ''must have an A in thej
'oiirs'e. It is as good as saying that
one should not have to abide )y the
instruitoi's opinion lof ones ability.
1ii general, he observes, Wvhule many
of the students on the 'l ichigan cam-
pus aie al that could be ([(Sired with
ga-(Io pci 1t eness yet there arie
,ioluc'in Wio li em a gnihl('old-faill-
i ni- court esycould be cultivated to
ad '21111a ge. If the inst ru cis, by
~;1'diii''anld example r-ather than by
1) i'( pt, (could1( teach the ordinar'y
wl ;') .i : 1 il <e s to thei' (lasses, t ie
I'nii\'city would be greatly benefitod.

APARTMENT USED
FOR PRACTICE IN
HOME ECONOMICS
University of Illinois women have a
perfectly appointed five-room apart-
ment in which they practice what they
have learned in their home economic
courses.
Four or five women from the prac-
tice apartment course live in the
apartment for a period of four weeks.
A faculty member of the home econ-
omic's department is in charge. The
women have complete charge of the
apartment, doing all the work ex-
cept the laundry. Thcy take turns as
house-manager, who buys the food,
enitertains the guests, acts as general
supervisor, cook, waitress, and maid.
Meals are planned according to
various income scales. Different
forms of table service are used in
cder to gain practice in tle various
methods. 'P'c pactice a pititiet 'stn-
delnts are required to have faculty
guests each week, and to give a tea
an1d formal dinner out of their budget.
Thle decoration of the apartment
and the arirai igemenlt of furniture is
done by students in home decoration
catursces.
'a11 ard work won't hurt anybody,''
says i's. Ciarles Gould, 88 years of
age and she points to the pile of
seven cord: ma p'e and birch wood
whih she split durig the summei.

i

Accordinigto crii cs, ''El er (=ar-
i rv'' ilay be termled anl ex(clhcilt Work
f 3ournalisin nrather-th a i, Miss
F'yO11s a tell Ta li rkmgton's The 1
Plutocrat,"' a portr ait of the American
'nlsiliess man. Warwick Deeping's
kitty" for vhiclh lany predict a
>-erimmlent a pi'"'ciat-ion in the liter-
ry society, Wescott's "Tbe Grand-
mothers" with its tendency to lose the
- sual sophisticated atmosphere of
novels, and works by the Norrisses,
Edith Wharton, and other writers who
have established their popularity
were reviewed.
Selma Lagerloff's new book "Char-
lotte" with its background in the
soc al life of modern Sweden was
recommended as a novel of character
)y Hildegarde Schueren, '30, who
hrnl ninw hn stn

\o-, eleedT
Be Only Golf "Pro,"
*idsFloridaClub
Invading th ohitherto stri lvl ma s-
culise caling of professional golft,
Bessie Fenn, chief professional of
tho Palm Beach Poincianna Golf club
is believed to be the only woman
S"pro'' in America and certainly the
only one heading a large club.
Miss Fenn is the sdaughter of the
noted professional Arthur Fenn who
spent 29 summers at Poland Springs
and 27 winters at Palm Beach teach-
ing the wealthy and famous. Begin-
ning to play golf when she was nine
years old Miss Fenn never received
lessons from anyone except her

four Years she hayed ill national
lliiniioli p5, (iUqailying each time
and her one i'egret in turning profes-
sional is lbat she no longer can play
Iin tournaments. Thus far ist Fenn
has never enttered a .professional golf-
er's tournament.
All miakes of ma-
'chines. Our equip-
ment and personnel
is considered among
the best in the state. The result of
t1eniy years' careful building.
O. D. MORRILL
117 Nickels Areade. Phone 6615.

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BEST BOARD
VALUE IN TOWN
Excellent Coffee
Corner State and
Washington

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Philosophizing from the bench on
the fascinations' of shopping, Mr.
Justice McCardie, London's bachelor
judge, held that women are often
lured, not by bargains, but by high
prices.
Men, too, like buying expensive
things, the court pointed out during
trial in the king''s bench division of a
firms suit against a woman who had
contracted for a quantity of fashion-
able clothes for which she had never
paid.j
"I really believe that if champagne
were six pence a bottle," remarkedI
the judge, "tomorrow far less of it
would be drunk."
Justice McCardie discussing the at-
traction of high prices with. plaintiff's
counsel fearlessly suggested that
women favor fur coats chiefly on ac-
count of their costliness.
NOTICES
There will be ai me eg of the
program committee of the Junior
Girls' Play at 12 o'clock today at Fos-j
ter's T'ea Room.
As the intramural basketb al I tour -
nament will start next week, all man-
agers should see that team member ,
complete heart and lung examinaticns
this week.
Announcem-ent was made T,10esdaa
night at the Kappa Delta hoese of
the engagement of Evelyn Ogborn
'28, to Richard Whipple, '25. Whipple
is a member of Phi Signa Kappa.
Announcement was recently male
of the marriage f Richard E. Mlc-
Ardle, junior instructor in the S'chool
of Forestry and Conservation, to
Miss Dorothy Aileen Coppage, grad-
uate assistant in botany. The mar-
riage took place on Dec. 29.
Announcing Our
PRE-INVENTORY
SALE

11 u v r 11ce meoa oI worK,
indicating that he composed slowly by
a sort of mosaic process of fitting var-
ious bits together. Some pages have
been reworked two or three times.
All kinds of paper make up this
first draft. Anatole France wrote on
the back of engraved invitations, gal-
ley proofs, and other kinds of discard-
ed paper. The work is written entire-
ly in ink. Even when Anatole France
felt impelled to make an architectural
sketch to aid him in composition, he
retained his pen.
The attempts of Misses Mercedes
Gleitz and Millie Hudson to swim theI
Strait of (Gibraltar failed since they

Women's growing influence as a
world peacemaker and the greatly in-
creased respect and confidence she
nowl commands from dipibmafs of
the "sterner sex" were plainly exem-
plified just before the opening of the
International Peace Study Congress of
Women, at Amsterdam. Women of
only two important nations were ab-
sent-Italy and Russia.
On the last day, Mrs. Carrie Chap-
man Catt, of New York ended an ad-
dres's with the words "Go home not to
tell how nice this congress was, but go
home to work."
Professor Maurette, Sir George
Paish, and Rear-Admiral Allan asked
that women lead the men into the way
of greater activity in behalf of arbi-
tration, security, and disarmament.
Miss Ruth Morgan, New York,
chairman of the congress expressed
her gratification at finding in Europe
so many efficient women.
Lady Astor was the chief speaker at
the congre'ss. She. said the trouble
with Europe was too much armament
and far too many toll barriers and
traditions. The United States has had
bu4 one tradition, to keep out of

uriefly reviewed t e s ory.w
The next meeting of the 0'soci-ty will father.
be the debate with Athena literary When her father died recently mem-
society, Jan. 10, in the Athena rooms. bers of the club decided to try the ex-
The last meeting of the inester will periment of putting a woman at the
be taken up by elections, and the head of the professioials' and so chose
plans for a one-act play to which Miss Fenn. In her work she is as-
members of Athena will be invited sisted by a staff of three men.
yere made. Golf, she believes, is a game which
is equally suited to men and women
The annual sales of the Montgom- and she admits that she has never
-ry-Ward Co. were more than $200,- been able to determine which of the
100,000. That exceeded the record of two 'sexes learns the quicker.
1926 by $3,000,000-a figure which was Miss Fenn is a former Maine chain-
the highest of any year in the history pion and on two different occasions
of the firm. has won the Palm Beach titles. For

7

TO GREET YOUR FRIENDS
Let us supply flowers for your J-Hop party;
Spring flowers in quantity for the

it

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Flowerday s

Flowers

occasion.

Order early.

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Phone 7014
Greenhouses, 1400 Traver St.

Nickels Arcade

"Flowers by Wire"

had to abandon the idea after each of foreign entanglenents yet tlhey have
them had been in the waver more than not been able to carry this out
10 hours. wholly, she remarked.
A "SWIRL" OF BARGAINS
Bargains to the left of you-
Bargains to the right of you-
Bargains in front and in back of you!
School and Afternoon Dresses,
Purses, Hankies and Jewelry
AFTER-HOLIDAY ' SALE AT
THE RUBLEY SHOPPE
In the Arcade
CORNWELL COAL - COKE'
Scranton, Pocahontas
Kentucky and West Virginia Coal
Solvay and Gas Coke
This business has been growing ever
since it was established. The secret-
"giving absolute satisfaction to 'our
customers." We believe it pays to do
business in a friendly way. If you
I ~Mik .o nn 1.et'. det to-ethe

NEW SPRING FROCKS
In a wide variety of colors and mt
$9.75 and $14.95
308
Maynardt
ostreeteeS--
OGo ope

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Near
lhe "11arj"

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= '-111111111 )1111111111lill l lill llll il1 11 1 tll l ll lll i 11 11 lil li1 1 .
ANNOUNCING THE OPENING
1== of
-- m .
--
Sandwich Shop
1204 South University
On Thursday Morning, Jan. 5th.
-= - - - - l I

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The Right Play
In the game of bridge, it's all in playing the
right card. Just so, in the game of fashion
success lies inl a careful selection of the bast
the season has to offer, by no means a difficult
noatter with the mode's latest stylings always
at hand at Mack's Store. The frocks, the
wraps, the hats; every accessory which is of-
fered you here has already been carefully
selected from all the mode has to offer. It
represents the trump in fashion's hand.
Whenever you're not quite
sure what the next play
should be stop in at Mack's
Store and learn the newest
rules in Fashion's game.

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15% Off
on all merchandise.

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