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December 03, 1927 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-12-03

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TWO

THE MICHICAN DAILY

SATURDAY. DECEMBER 21. 1927

. . .. . ... . ............. . . .. . ............. .............. . ............................ ................ . . ...

LJJTTTIID cV.T11 1',\ 1,.1 1 1 It , ,7

NEW' MEDICAL SCHOOL ADMITACE SYSTEM
RECEIVES APPROVAL OF BOARD OF REGENTS;
COMMITTEE WILL PASS ON ALL APPLICANTS

CANDlIDATES WIL B1W TD~ TlID ON
BASIS OF CIIARAC'TER
AND SC1OL1A11llP

FOUR TO
Examinations
Fitness

COMPOSE BODY
Of Seniors Will Asurej
Of Graduates For
Profession *

The new regulations for admittance
to the Medical School, as approved
by the Regents at their meeting last
night, were outlined in a statemen1
given out by the University authori-
ties shortly after the meeting. The
statement, which defines the proces
by which all freshmen will enter the
Medical School next fall, follows:
"Improved methods of selectin-
freshman medical students and of ex-
amining candidates for the medical
degree were approved by the Regents
of the University of Michigan at their
meeting of Dec. 2, 1927. The former
will, it is hoped, aid in overcoming a
most difficult situation occasioned by
the large number of students applying
for admission to the Medical School,
and will allow those to be selected
who give most promise of profession-
al success. The new examinations for
seniors are of great public interest,
for they will be an effective means of

1)er; cf the faculty cannot go in per-
son. The interviews will be similar
in character and designed to show
whether the applicant is personally
fitted to become a physician. They
will be supplemented by letters of in-
quiry, sent to at least two teachers
of each aplicant, one in the sciences
and one in the humanities, asking for
their cuinions as to the candidate's
industry, jlersenality, honesty, intel-
lgcnce. and suitability to come into
the sick room. Each candidate inter-
yiewed,( will also, he require(l to write
English. A photograph will also he
requ:l , of each applicant. Students
at the Arts College of the University
of ichipan must comply with the
same requirements as others.
Sailaeify Limited By ('his .roonls
The faculty committee's report con-
cludes as follows: "As the capacity
of the School is limited by the size
of the classrooms, it must be under-
stood that a choice is necessary. In
I making thi :hoice, the Committee
will take in consideration the ap-
plicant's reputation, his apparent iii
telligence and fitness to study medi-
cine in addition to his scholastic
standing."
"In adopting this report, the medi-
cal faculty and the Regents under--
stand that the present proportion of

PREMIER CONFERS WITH COOLIDGE; NOTED JAPANESE C
SHOWN WITH AMERICAN S CRET ARY ALUMNUS IS DEAD
Word has been received from Tokio,
Japan, of the death of Yeijiro Ono,
governor of the Industrial Bank of
Japan and alumnus of the University.
... :Yeijiro Ono was born in July, 1868,
at Yamagawa, Fukuoka Prefecture.
Ile studied at the Doshisha univer-
sity at Kyoto until 1880. Coming to
the United States, he entered Oberlin
college from which he was graduated.
He then entered the University of
Michigan and received the degree of
Doctor of Philosophy in 1889. His
Ann Arbor friends included Henry
Carter Adams, then professor of po-
litical economy.I
Upon his return to Japan in 1890,
he established the political school atl
Doshisha and became its head pro-
fessor. He entered the Bank of Japan
in 1897 and held various important
j posts, including the headship of the
New York and London branches. OneI
of the founders of the present fiscal
systems of Japan, he soon came to be
regarded as one of the outstanding M
Japanese financeers. In 1913 he re- Y
signed from the Bank of Japan to be- has
---- come Governor of the Industrial Bank. Gen
_ _ _ all-i'
Premier William Lyon Mackenzie King, of Canada, extended cordiality REED TO ADDRESS atI
from across the border by lunching with President Coolidge in Washington. ET AEAnn
In this photo taken at the White House are, left to right: Vincent Massey, CLEVELAND CLUB
Canadian minister to the United States: Secretary o;-State Frank B. Kell- -__
ogg, and Premier King. i
Prof. Thomas H. Reed, of the polit-I
ical science department, left for Cleve- 4
IITICSCollo uium land last night where he is to address
sP s t R pthe City club this noo.t on "The
PreCsented eport Borough Plan of City Government."
Reports on tho' Chicago meeting of Agitation for a borough plan broke
BtheAmerican Physical society were out following the recent charter elec-
presented at the Physics colloquium tion when many suburban residents,
hell recently in room 1041 of the East opposed to a direct annexation, began
Famous Illustrator To Make Personal lhysics building, to feel an interest in the city of Cleve-
Comment On Exceptional Work Several members of the Physics. de- land. Mayor Marshall has appointed
In Student Contest partment attended the sessions of the a borough plan advisory committee
society which were held on Friday and consisting of 250 members and Pro-
WILL ASSIST IN JUDGING Saturday of last week in the Ryerson fessor Reed is to be the first authority
Physical laboratory in Chicago. . to address this group. le will explain
James Montgomery Flagg, dean of Prof. George W. Rainich, magister how the borough plan works, what it
American illustrators, has consented of pure mathmetics here, delivered an offers to those communities where it
to criticize and make personal com- address on "The Corpuscular Theory has been adopted, and how it can be
of Light and Gravitational Shift" in applied to the city of Cleveland.
ments to artists who submit drawings which he treated the subject from the Professor Reed is an authority on
of exceptional merit to Michigan pub- standpoint of the theory of relativity. municipal government, having served
lications and College Humor in their on the Pennsylvania commission on
$2,000 art contest. For more than 37 FACULTY MEMBER municipal consolidation of counties.
His plan of borough government for
years Flagg's illustrations have ap- GOES TO LANSING Pittsburgh is now before the voters
peared in the leading magazines in of Pennsylvania as a constitutional
America. His comments and crit- Prof. Robert Craig Jr., attended a amendment.
icisms can not be obtained in any meeting of high school teachers Fri-
other way. day at Lansing, where he went in
order to promote closer relations be-
Undergraduate artists may submit tween the University school of For- tRF
as many drawings as desired, on any estry and the high school teachers.
subject, in black and, white, before The university is undertaking to bring
Jan. 15. Two other famous artists, about a closer association in order°NO
Arthur William Brown and Gaar Wil- to spread forest information among
hams, will decide with Flagg on the students of preparatory schools. Craig
winning 81 drawings. also visited the state department of SIIIS
Three original drawings by these public iistructiQn with the same view D Y
three artists will be presented to the in mind. He represented Dean Samuel(2:00
comic magazines or publications on T, Dana of the forestry school at the 3:30
whose staffs the grand prize winners high school teachers meeting as Dana
are regular contributors. was unable to attend.
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _Nowak__ _ _ __

-osen To Command O " ll).r' < , :ttl
In Philippine Area ,sudent activitytickets, may attend
X3 events, including all athiotai con-
tests, musical program , plays and
lectutires for only $10. This is an aver-
age cost of only about 19 cents for
:"; eatch event.
GEORGIA TE' CII. Fire rcently do-
stroyed all of the foot1bail equipment
§ at the Georgia Institute of Technoo-

Detroit Theaters

Il

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2nd and Last Week
Beg. Sunday, Nov. 27-Mats.,
Wednesday and Saturday
t(enie Buck Presents
Leon Errol in,
"YO)UR{S TRULY"
CASS THEATRE
Prices: Nights, $1.00 to $11W.
3atinews, $1.00 to $30.50, plus tax

,

I

ajor-4eneral Douglas MacArthur.
oungest American general, who5
been chosen to succeed Major-
eral Fred Sladen to command the
important Philippine department
Manila next spring.
THE RAE_____
SATURDAY
A Desperate G ame'r
(Not a poker game)
"The Outlaw"
Soon-Norma Shearer
in "After Midnight"
____RAE_

Shubert
LAFAY ETTE DETROIT
NOW SHOWING!
Twice Daily-2:15 and 8:15
UNCLE TOM'S CABIN
Presented by Carl Laemmle
Prices-Nights, 50c, 75, $1.00,
$1.50. Matinees, 50c, 75e, $1.00.
All Seats Reserved

1

discovering before graduation any Michigan students will be substantial-
doubtful product of the school and Iy maintained in the annual entering
thereby tend to raise the standard of classes. There is at present a con-
medical practice. siderable majority of students from
"These matters have been studied this State in the school, as of course
carefully and at length by committees there should be. It is, however, a tra-
of the medical faculty, who reports Eition of the University, which the
were submitted to the Regents in No-I Regents feel it would be unwise to
vember. At that time they were re- !break, to welcome students from oth-
ferred to the -Regents' Committee on (P states to Michigan classes.
Educational Policies, who have now "Michigan also has definitely adopt-
reported them with their approval to ed the policy of accepting just as
the Board. The new provisions go intoI many medical students as can phys-
effect at once. ically be accommodated. Its freshman
All Applications Accepted In 1920( class of 200 is the largest in the
"The records of the Medical School country. This is based on the belief
show that up to the class which en- that the country as a whole needs
tered in 1921 the School was able to more doctors. The number of medical
accept all qualified applicants for en- graduates reached a low point in 1922
trance. In 1922, however, approxi- and has been rising since that time,
mately 426 students, all of whom but the proportion of physicians to
satisfy the requirements of the School the general ponulation, it has been
applied, but only 186, or about 44 per estimated, will sink until about 1945
cent, could be accepted, simply be- because of the fact that so large a
cause larger classes could not be ac- fraction of the profession at present
commodated with the then existing or are advanced in years and are being
present facilities of the School and lost to active service by death or re-
Hospital. It is perhaps possible to tirement. Before the -war the propor-
handle larger classes in the first two tioi of physicians in the population
years, in which the fundamental sci was about one to 800. It is now in
ences are studied, but not in the last the neighborhood of one to 900. In
two years of the course, when the thsstuatio te Medical tcoo fee.lsn
students enter the Clinics at the Uni- it should do its part in turning out
versity Hospital and have to be handl- practitioners.
ed in small groups by the hospital Follows Leading Schools
staff. An entering class of about 200 "It may be remarked that in adopt-
is the largest that can possibly be ing the principle of selection based
taken without duplicating the pres- , on personality in addition to scholar-
ent Hospital and staff, which would 'ship, judged through personal inter-
be prohibitively expensive. view and inquiry, Michigan is con-
"The new plan places the duty of forming to the practice at Columbia,
selection in the hands of a committee 1ennsylvania, Harvard, and Johns
consisiing of the Dean and two mel- Iopkins, among the leading medical
bers of the medical faculty, with the schools.
President of the University in con- "The other new plan adopted is
sultation. Applications must be filed to have a comprehensive examination
before May 1. The Committee will de- to all candidates for a medical degree
termine before July 1 the applicants , at the end of the senior year. This
academically qualified for admission' will supplement the examinations
and will summon each individual for regularly given on the completion of
a personal interview some time be- each separate course, and is design-
tween July and July 15. Applicants ed to show whether the candidatN has
residing at a distance will be required retained what he should of each sub-
to appear before representatives of ject, has properly related the separ-
the school at centers nearer their arate subjects one to the other, and
place of residence. For this service has the ability to bring al his re-
the School expects to enlist some of sources to bear upon a given prob-
its more prominent alumni if mem- em.

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Woodward, at Eliot
BONSTE L E
PLAY HOUSE
TWO WEEKS beginning Mon.,
Nov. 28
The Gleason Tabor Laugh
Gene
"IS ZAT SO"

4

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-LAST TIMES, TODAY-
A Genius at Work!

IL

Don't forget that it is only
a few swiftly passing weeks
till Christmas - and Cirist-
mas gifts.
The wise gift-giver does not
wait till the televenth hour'
to make his selections. He
buys while the buying is
good; that is to say, before
stocks are thinwed out and
overhandled.
For a gift that combines beauty
and everyday usefulness, an
electric household appliance
is recommended. It will please
any woman. Drop in at
our office this week and
look at these hand-
some_ tinrt -

lOc-30c.40c
Nights
1Oc-50Ce
r te ansh
$i
i ,
itranded on a
thought was
only a golfer
turned lnto a
caveman
goofer-and
she couldn't
walk home
ALSO-
Larry Semon in "What A Man"
PARAMOUNT NEWS

What happens when a solid,1
:ontented married man goes
WAY OF ALL FLESH !
stirring drama!

happy,
THE
Soul-

ENJIL JANNIINOS
'IieYyjMI l Fle,4

ADOPHZUvO
ESSE L LA$1
a-
VICTOR
FLEM INGr
9rodudim

J,

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-" i

41

THEN COMES SUNDAY

Another Creation of The Finer Arts!

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