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December 03, 1927 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-12-03

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10

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3, 1927

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

PAGE THREE

ARABIAN NIGHTS OBiGIN
.TRACED THROUGH TIME
BY TUBINGEN SCHOLAR
]LANGUAGE OF TALES IS SPEECH
USED BY COMMON PEOPLE
OF ANCIENTU ARABIA
LECTURER IS AUTHORITY
Has Taken Part In Eastern Expedi-
tions And Is Expert In Rare
Dialects Of Remote Peoples
Speaking yesterday afternoon in
Natural Science auditorium, Dr. Enno
Littmann, of the University of Tu-
bingen, delivered a lecture upon the
subject, "The Origin of the Arabian
Nights."
In opening the talk, XDr. Littmann
compared the Arabian Nights, other-
wise known os "The Thousand-and-One
Nights," to a multi-colored meadow,
composed of many different kinds of
lbright and refreshing flowers. He
athen made a little apology for what-
,ever "weeds' may be found in the
works, explaining that what is offen-
sive to modern morals was absolutely
proper at the time that the stories
were written.
According to Dr. Littmann, the
Arabian Nights made their first liter-
ary appearance in Europe in 1704 to
1717, in the form of a series of 12 vol-
umes by a Frenchman named Galon.
The writing was extremely well-done,
and immediately aroused the interest
of the entire European reading public.
It was soon translated into all Eur-
opean languages, and was even re-
translated into the Oriental languages
from which it was taken.
Attempts To Trace Origin
Since the beginning of the ninteenth
century scholars have been endeavor-
ing to. trace these tales back to their
origin. This research work has not
yet been completed, owing to changes
made in the original manuscripts by
subsequent translators. Thus the
names of characters as used in the
present versions of the work are
recognized to be of Persian origin,
the frame storybundoubtedly Indian,
the language employed is of the type
used by the common people of Arabia
-in spite of the fact that it is put into
the mouths of kings and princes-
and other parts are traced back to
Syrian, Mesopotamian, and medieval
Egyptian.
The frame story is composed of
three parts, clearly distinguished in
the course of the lecture, and of which
only the third part was included in
the originalversion. Dr. Littmann
also expressed the belief that the title,
"One Thousand-and-One Nights" was
intended to express merely a large
number, and should not be taken
literally
Speaker Is Linguist
Dr. Littmann has taken part in a
great many expeditions to foreign
countries in his study of ,the more
remote and rarer languages and
dialects, chiefly in Syria. Abyssinia,
etc. He is one of the outstanding fig-
ures in the linguistic field, and is
noted for his adaptibility in learning
languages. Although, English is not
his native tongue, he mastered it
thoroughly, idioms, figures of speech,
as well as the literary side of it, in
about six months, and his lecture yes-
terday was delivered in faultless lan-
guage, with no trace of accent.'

AIRCRAFT SQUADRON MANEUVERS 'Complete Sures'
OVER FLEET IN PACIFIC REVIEW Ann Arbor Indtry
Tn crni r ornn ustr

........ t s ; :. :...

i u oI 1n y mL r u of I iu In o An annual finished product vaLiuv
tion of $8,000 000 and yearly wages
paid 'amounting to $2,000,000 are out-
Officials of the United States Civil ,ianding features of an Ann Arbor
Service commission announce that industrial survey just comphIleted by
nine positions in the service are open O. O. McLeish, secretary of the Cha-
to applicants, appointment being de- ber of Commerce.
iVicLeish's report further iniicated
cidled upon by the regular examina- that the total capital employed by Ann
tions. Arbor's 88 industries is $7,250,000.
College men are especially sought, The surrey, as completed. contains a
as most of the positions require highly review of freight and public uftiliies
specialized or technical work. Among rates, school census, wealth, trans-
the various jobs are: junior carto- portation and recreational offerings
graphic engineer for coast and geo- of the city. It is being prepared for
detic survey work, biochemist for the a certain Detroit firm which has been
hygienic laboratory at Washington, negotiating with the Chamber of ('n-
T). C., associate chemists for depart- merce with views of locating here.
mental service both at the capital and The prospectus explains that 2,401
at New York city, assistant and asso- freight cars daily are conveyed
ciate bacteriologists for the depart- through this city where freight is Un-
ment of agriculture, associate and as- E loaded and taken on board., The rail
sistant pathologists for the United roads also maintain 47 regular p;>-
1 States Bureau of Mines, milk tech- senger schedules. The secretaryv
nologist for the Bureau of Animal In- wrifes "that Ann Arbor enjoys a more
dustry, marketing specialists of dairy favorable rate on all six classes or
products for the Bureau of Agricul- freight between Chicago, Cincinnati.
tural Economics, and an associate and Pittsburgh than Detroit has be-
aquatic biologist for the Bureau of tween the same points."
Fisheries station at Beaufort, N. C. Bank resources total $21,236,030.41,
Salaries for these positions range according to the reports. School 8I-
from $1,860 per year for the junior tendance, including the University is
cartographic engineer to $3,800 for the 15,157; there are more than 20 church-,
ilk technologist. The commission's es with a total property valuation of
notice stated that these salaries were $6,000,000. The pamphlet informs the
merely entrance salaries and that fu- reader that there are 300 lakes- and
ture promotion would embody higher resorts with an hour's ride of Ann
salaries. Arbor.

ii
ad the Oren"
f y i C. r.k~n and ,Steak Dinners At
0* Cfe
All Day Sunday Dinner
ancing Noon and Evening
Spec.ia Dollar Dinner During the Week
Dancing Every Evening
Phone 9066 for Reservations
Cornwell Building
02 N. Fourth Avenue
Subscribe For The Weekly.

These photos, snapped at the naval air station at fan Diego, Cal., dur-
ing the maneuvers of the Pacific fleet, show some of the tactics of the air-
craft squadron. Above, a Martin bomber is landing at the field after a
flight from Washington, D.C., tQ take part in the maneuvers. Below, an
aerial machine gunner in action, and inset, the bursting of a bomb dropped
by a navy seaplane.

FORMER TEACHER
WILL TALK HERE
C. C. Edmonds, formerly of the econ-
omics department of the University,
and now in charge of the retail
agencies of the Buick Motor company,
will speak to the students of the
others interested on "Sales Control in
School of Business Administration and
Automobile Merchandising" Wednes-
day afternoon, Dec. 13, in room 206,
Tappan hall.
Edinonds was instructor in a course
of industrial management in the econ-
omics department here. Acting Dean
Clare E. Griffin, of the business ad-
ministration school, says of him, "He
is a man of considerable academic
training in business, and has had
several years of experience with the
Buick Motor company, and so he has
a considerable knowledge of the sub-
ject."

Gilberts Norris
Juilleret's
302 S. State Dial 5S60
Fresh Salted Nuts,
Almonds, Pecans, Cashews,
Pignalias.
Filberts Brazils
Peanuts
25c to $1.50 per lb.

You will be pleasantly surprised at
ThE Print and Book Shop
521 East Jefferson

Fiction
Poetry
Biography
Hours: 9 to 6

Standard Editions
Autographed Copies
Rare Bindings
Books of Trravel-Children's h~ooks

Prints
Etchings
Wood Blocks

3

Telephone 21081

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Classified
A dbertising
Pays!

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is very nominal and the results are very gratifying. It affords an
advertising medium at a very reasonable cost.

The cost
excellent

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Laun ry t...pment.
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