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March 13, 1927 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-03-13

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

AR9CHITECTURAL HEAD
P~FCEflFNFXIRT I &.'

113, 11

.. ....

AILrWALY sotl -Fvc iprals Skysen pera
1)i~iving S114 'I11) Ale.i r
~L~SOIVIPIQKS GRQ!JP
P ~f. miLoreclt, head of the Col-1
li.o ' 01 ciotue al the ptni~ fta ublic to the collecton of
(Iaw in:-,of itall buildigs noO onex-
iitioni in thneWet Gallery of Alum-
iii Mem ;;oriaLl lHall. P'rofessor LofrehZbe-
lievestatlihe xhibit 1has something
of nteestfor ever'yonle in that it
deal, withi a vital part Of modern
urb),n life, th, sky-scraper, andf itsi

present treatment.
Corona Mundi, the International
Art Center invited Mr. Alfred ;C.
Bllossom, a promifnent American ar-
chit eet , to select this group of fine
renderings for public exhibition.
Among the (drawings at present in
Aluni Memorial hall is one by Mr.
Hugh ?'erris, whose drawings, "The
City V the Future," have attracted
considerable attention in current per-
ibdicals. Mr.F Ferris presents his work
in the formh(f a fantasy; it is char-
nterized by a powerful swep) of
imagination in the portrayal of .the
future city.
American poft, musicians, and art-
ists have long been the target of Eu-
ropean critics, whlo say that America
produces nothing original. These
critics are forced to admit that the
American architect is making a dis-
tinct contribution to the realm of art
in the treatment of mass and struc-
ture.
The skeleton-frame building is yet
a new ,thing. The tall 'building was
unheard of a hundred years ago. It
took daring to erect the first tall
building. Tile was te double risk
of life and 'money involved, for it
was thought' that a tall skeleton-
framned building-would not stand the
,ireat stress and strain of wind storms
and earthquakes; that the steel
frames would deteriorate through
rust or corrosion. It is said that a
pioneer of the tall building put .his
office on the top floor of a structure
he had, built to prove his confidenc
in his own work.
Ornament on a sky-scraper has to
be andled delicately. The pioneers
of the tall building had 'only the u-
ropean traditional' ornament to use.
t was too mouch to ask them to
create their .Awn onament; their dar-
ing'In construction was enough. Since
then there as been a definite ad-
vance in the handling of sky-scraper
adornment, from Louis sullivan to
lie present tendency toward geomet-
rical form as. shown in the wrk of
Claude rag4Yn,
bowu he g ,of Qreek or Roman
colmn,,around the" tops of tall
buildngs .ar41a ivig way to.-the ex-#
pression of &,asses, and the effects
of heght ; iPn dy -verticality in
ornament Amrica has created an
original fori i.f building; it is now
creating its ofi~ adornment. In a fev
years, no Q e will e able to say
with truth ~~ the American form
has Greek, 6 man or Gothic, feel-
ing in orpat.
These' ha' * are noticeable in the
drawings at Alumni Memorial Hall.
Some of th~e "buildings have been
built; others",il be built within five
or ten '.ears; stil others inAy never
be built. This is an excellent oppor-
tunity to see what is being don.i, and
what will be done with the cities of
the future.
Exchange Iead Says
Stalents Regularly
MFake Outside Calls
f
Use of the long distance telephone
by students at Ann Arbor as a resort
in; case 'of emergency or unsual
news i a thing of the past, in the
opinion of Mr. J. J. elly, of the local
telephone cxcange. "The time has
come when students here use te long
distance service regularly a a means
of comiuni'ation between themselves
and friends or relatives," says Mr.
Yelly. His records show that a steady
,ncrease in use of these facilities by
raudents has been noticeable in the
ast few years. Many students place
alls for home stations at stated in-
" :,vals, allowing such' conversations
to take the place of correspondence.
m xtensive use, of 'toll servis,, is
:ade in Anni Arbor (uring the foot-
all season, when more than 3,000
cals per dlay are frequently handled.
"i was particularly noticeable dur-
1!, the last football season. The rush:
ould uwiaily a tart on MK)I'ay o01

IWc2 'e ~~g22gamne, and
aIi~a 1 e ase in vl'3ume aat otturday
)p;cahe. urngthis3 pericd itt
(;afl ucc~nai~to kop upa con-
;,Unuv owm"i Wcon betwCCII long diS -
Lt M~fj.s nte Fieldhou:;e.
Thee arbeen no1 l;.!iit to"t) C(tn
C' E)1 i ti S (.1,n b . The i (30 to ,
I te ~ichianTCC~lh~iCcomphany
mow t, coeils are frequently 1mad e
A! erTO WSuHOdistant points as
1cr in Clifornia, W:ahington, Tex- '
:, .11ri1,(an the more istgnt
: v 1,i ces in (;an1ada.'

2AI

U l

77

*With', Professional Models and Vaudeville

She

Was Gay!o

She

Was Gogos

3I

- -and Ohf, how-she could Black-bottom!
No one knew. that beneath her flashing smile was a heart that
hungered for the one thing g~oadhvaj could not give her-love.
In the chorus of dazzling beau~ics, in the glittering- night clubs, i1 the wild parties after the show-she w.

a trail of madl merriment! Here is the picturec You've been
Cuties ! The greatest spectacle of stage. life ever filmed.

'4Jaiting for!
SEE IT!

Sees Life behind the scenes.

Ieau ties of the chorus.

No Advance in, Prices
Stage Presentationi at
MATINEE '3:30J NIGHTS 7:20, 9:20
Week Da'ys Style Show at 7:20, 9:00 Only
.4 .nttaJa L

Thrills ! Laughs! Tears!I
The Champagne party.
And Many
big, spectacular
thrills!

hirled along /C4
Beauties and
ca
. 1.
~,,,.....

ATTEND THE
MATINEE at 1:30
and Avoid Waiting
for Seats

'i
I
I
oi

I

fk

ALL MRC""HANDISE OR STYLE SHOW FURNISHED BY
MERCHANTS LkSTD BELOW

All Fur',CoatI-

Cl.,1-,,.
'U.

are f roe:.

rs,

ur Shot) 21?1E E. U ;1

i'
..er. vw i

All Hats, Coats, Dresses Dsiplayed on the
Stage are from Our Own Stocks
Fashion Shop
323 South Main Street

Ft

-- , - T -Av

w .,...tee..

Shoesby argi:; ootery, Wu4
N
Y f" \
i.v {sr trrt:r r ?. s
r r r srh r.Y:vs u (
sr n~v3 vtx A nY. r +{
5... tt~ tt i r tt,"A (t
r Xrj~v >St;:i } t" 'C'tt sy 4J ' ~dr ssDor

erth Arcade

Hey!
Hey!
it's
the
"Black
Bottom"9

t4
f/
f.,

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j;:
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_

7 -

A
,,
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r' ,' \
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$., 1'

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4111 I;Tj f if, 'I M AIMPM 11 , 9 r. _ tahIN Ia P -q IT I I ®A J-I-1 .-4.1 rAft I

I

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