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March 03, 1926 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-03-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE FOUR

THE .MICIGCAN fDAILY

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Iww Y M

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
sMembers; o Western Conference Editorial
Association.'
.Adsoiated Press is exclusively en-
Ied to the use for republication of all news
. rpatchcs credited to it or not otherwise
c td in this paper and the local news pub-
),(I a erein
untered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Vichigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of pstage granted by Third Assistant Post-
aster General.
Subscription by carrier, $3.50; by mail,
.00.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
2tard Street.
Phones: EditorIal, 4925; busIness, oxaz-

Building for the future is an
ancient and honorable occupation,
which just recently has earned the LOTS
dignity of a profession. Preparing ,
for the "rainy day" has long been a COURSES
characteristic of civilized man. Where-}
as the cave man lived for the presentwo
There was nto Humor Strike yesier-

Vl

FDITOR1A1 STAFF,
Telephone 4924
MANAGING EDITOR
GEORGE W. DAVIS

/

Chairman, Editorial Board....Norman R. Thal'
City Editor............Robert S. Mansfield
N:ws Editor...........Manning Houseworth
. :. , 1Ls Editor-...........Helen S. Ramsay
iditor...............Joseph Kruger
I Eiiitor...........HWilliam Walthour
\oicand Drama... .....Robert B. Henderson
Night Editors
Smith H. Cady Leonard C. Hall
Robert T. DeVore Thomas V. Koykka
W. Calvin Patterson
Assistaut City Editors
Irwin Olian Frederick-H. Shillito
Assistants

Gertrude Bailey
Chales Behyrner
William Bryer
'i lip Brooks
Farri,2nm Buckingham
S, ,:rron ]3uck
Carl Burger
Lugar Carter
C hauerlain
IM" yer Cohen
( ki lton Champe
bbiati s Doubleday
F gcue ]-. Gutekunst
Andrew Goodman
J amcs T. Herald
R u s ll ll itt
M1 les Kimball
Nfarion Kubik

Harriett Levy
Ellis Merry
Dorothy Morehouse
Margaret Parker
Stanford N. Phelps
'imon Rosenbaum
Wilton Simpson
Janet Sinclair
Courtland Smith
Stanley Steinko
Louis Tendler
Henry Thurnas
David C. Vokes
Marion Wells
Cassam A. Wilson
Thomas C. Winter
Maguerite Zilske

only, moreadvanced laces have stored
away a part of the plenty of today for
the lean years of tomorrow. The
enormous savings-bank deposits of
the present time are an indication of
the prevailing spirit of planning for-
the future.
The ancients built their pyramids,
sphinx, the Appian Way, the Colise-
um, the Great Wall of China, and
their magnificent temples. In modern
times, there has been great activity
in highway construction and park de-
velopment. Billions have been spent'
on better Roads, with city, county,
state, and national governments all
participating.
Yet both in modern and ancient
times this building for the future in
reality has, been merely building for
present needs. Although the projects
have remained through the ages, they
were not constructed with the needs
of the coming ages in mind. Examples
of the shortsightedness of our fore-
fathers can be seen in every large
city, with their narrow streets and
the resultant congestion of traffic. Of
course our grandfathers didn't know
that the auto would become so pop-f
ular, but our fathers ought to have
been able to see it when they took
over the reins.
Only recently has there been grow-
ing up a profession that turns its
telescope beyond the present decade
and visions the needs of the next.
These "futurists" are planning to-
day's building so that it will be a
benefit, and not a hindrance, to the
coming generations. Highways and
city streets are laid out to handle the
probable traffic of the future. Parks
are developed where the people of to-
morrow will need them. The activities
of the "futurists" lead also to city
zoning and other plans for bettering
conditions in the cities. This profes-
sion has the largest field of activityj
imaginable-for tomorrow.
You never realize the advantages of
co-educational institutions until you
visit one other than your own,-for
purely social reasons.

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BUSINESS STAFF
Telephpno 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
BYRON W. PARKER

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Advertising.................Joseph J. Finn
Advertising........ ..... Frank R. Dentz, Jr.
Advertising.................Wm. L. Mullin
(t rtisiung..........Thomas D. Olmsted, Jr.
Cicculation...............Rudolph Bostelman
Accounts....................Paul W. Arnold
Assistants

George H. Anuable, Jr.
W.Carl Bauer
hn U. 3obrink
aCion A. Daniel
Nary Flinterman
James R. DePuy
Stan Gilbert
T. Kenneth Haven
Irank Holmes
Frank Mosher

F. A. Norquist
Loleta G. Parker
D)avid Perrot
Robert Prentiss
Wm. C. Pusch
Joseph D. Ryan
Stewart Sinclair
Mance Solomon
Thomas Sunderland
\m., J. Weinman
Sidney Wilson

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 3, 1926
Night Editor - LEONARD C. HALL
"Manifestly the salary of the
Federal judges in this Democratic
country must be large enough in
the interest of equal justice for
all our people to enable the
lawyer of commanding ability but
of modest means to enter cheer-
fully uppon a lifetime of service
on the Federal bench. Repre-
sentative Graham's pending bill
to increase judicial salaries made
provision no more than ade-
quate."--William Green, president
of the American Federation of.
Labor.
A "CONFESSION'I
Colonel -louse, Presidenr Wilson's1
famous war-time advisor, reveals, in
"The Intimate Papers of Colonel
House," that class rooms had little
detraction for him. In preparatory
school and in the large eastern uni-

And while we're
splashing thdough the
fifty miles to the south
spring-like.

slipping and
ice and slh,
all is dry and

Is there really such a great differ-
ence between the age a person looks
and feels?

day. It seems our neighbor wanted
more space to blow a few more gusts.
Now that the strike is all settled
and everything, we hope to resume
publication with even greater vigor
than before. The mere fact that we
were able to use the headline which
were we did, shows that the publish-
ers are willing to grant our terms
without pettiness.
s f .
In continuance of our policy to ad-
vocate a greater variety of courses
for American Universities, as sug-
gested by members of the student
body themselves we herewith publish
a curriculum of courses from another
institution which, we believe, will
give you food for thought:
From the catalog of the College o,
Business Administration of the pro-
posed Universiy of Miami at Coral
Gables, Florida:
REAL ESTATE MANAGEMENT 50
-five hours credit-both semesters.
Dean Knight and staff.
An intensive investigation into the
theory and practice of Real Estate
ofice operation. Especial emphasis
is laid unon field work which is car-
ried on in subdivisions surrounding
the University. Prominent Realtors
from different parts of the State will
address the class from time to time.
This course is a prerequisite to any
other course in the University.
SALESMANSHIP 777-three hours
-first semester. Prof. Sharp and as-
sistants.
The course begins with a brief con-
sideration of the ethics of salesman-
ship and the practical application of
the doctrine of caveat emptor (let the
buyer beware). A study is made of
the latest and most effective meth-
ods of selling real estate, with spe-
cial attention to subdivision lots. A
thorough analysis is made of the go-
getter type of salesman and some of
the best specimens are brought in
from the field for laboratory experi-
mentation.
PSICHOLOGY OF SALESMAN-.
SHIP 1111-four hours-second se-
mester. Dr. Ponzi.
A comprehensive study of the work-
ing of the buyer's mind. Some con-
sideration is given to hypnotism as a
practical aid in difficult cases. The
fixation of attention, the development
of imagination and emotions, and the
repression of instinct and reason are
the principal subjects covered. The
determination of the psychological
moment is one of the major aims of
the course.
GEOLOGY 189--two hours - first
semester. Prof. Bobbs.
The first half of this course is de-
voted to a systematic study of the
history and recent developments of
the tides. An attempt is made to
measure accurately the time limits
within which lots can be sold before
discouraging the buyer.
. The second half of the course deals
with swamp drainage and weather
prediction. A special study is made
of the statistics of rainfall in order to
determine the best time to conduct
auction sales of real estate lots.
E NGLISI 21-2-One hour-both
semesters. Prof. Reithard.
This course is intended for those
students who expect to write pro-
spectuses for real estate subdivisions.
A special study is made of the use of
adjectives in description and during
the course the student compiles a
complete list of the superlatives of
both the English and French lan-
guages. (No previous knowledge of
French is required). Readings are
assigned in the current literature in
this field and the student is required
to write several advertisements for
actual situations.

REAL ESTATE PR ACTICE 1000-
both semesters-credit to be arrang-
ed. Assistant Dean Dey.
An opportunity will be given a few
selected students to obtain some ex-
perience in practical Real Estate
Management and Selling. A case book
is used and from time to time repre-
sentative Realtors will present their
selling problems to the class for solu-
tion. Each student will also be given
an opportunity to sell lots on a com-
mission basis but he should not ex-
pect to work his way through school
by taking this course.
-Adam Smith, Jr.
* * *
IS OtUR CAMPIUS ALL WE PT?
Thus reads an for something which
we have seen posted in all the most
conspicuous places about town. This
sort of thing isn't even funny. It'sI
not subtle, and it's rubbing it in. Is
it anybody's fault that we have rain
and snow out here, and that after-
wards it freezes and melts? There's
even more water in Venice, we wager,I
but we are willing to bet that they

MU S IC I
ANID
DRAMA
THIS AFTERNOON: The Organ
Recital in Hill auditorium at 4:15
o'clock.
TONIGHT: The Students Recital in
the School of Music auditorium at 8
o'clock.
* * .
INTERNATIONAL NIGHT
A review, by Robert Henderson.
"Now you gotta remember there
was a letter from this guy Moore, and
everyone thinks you're sore. And then,
listen, you've gotta put on the blarney
once in a while. Lord, they're oilly.
amateurs after all, and I guess there's
some dope in the S. C. A. the money
goes to. Oh, well . god, I don't
know what you thought, but I guess it
was pretty terrible. I'm not sure
there was much I liked, but maybe
this Russian fellow wasn't so ;rank,
not as good as I thought perhaps;
well, you see I haven't seen the show
before and all the press bunk has run
him up so high. The trouble was, see,

Ste s 11iNozakevi ic

GRAHAMS

4.

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Irving Warmolts,D S-C
CHIROPODIST AND
ORTHOPEDIST
707 N. University Ave. Phone 21212
XMAKi>~L
f .
"A Wiser and Better Place
to Buy."
New Spring Fats Are Ready.
Hats Gleaned and Blocked.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard Street Phone 7415.
(Where D. U. R. Stops at State St.)
PLEASE
DON'T.
PATHS
ON THE
Paths on snow form ice and kill
all grass roots beneath. Please
don't make or use such paths.

I

trldge Ss

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CAMPUS OPINION
Anonymous communications will - be
disregarded. The names of communi-
cants will, however, be regarded as
confidential upon request.

versity which he attended, he says,I
lectures and recitations were just so
niuch drudgery,-necessary evils toI
be suffered for the sake of a college
education.
Quite frankly, this man who repre-
sented the United States in the Su-
reme War council at Versailles in
1917, who was appointed by the Presi-
d(ent to take part in the task of ar-
ranging terms of the armistice, andI
who subsequently sat as a member
of the American commission to ne-{
gotiate peace, admits that he gavej
but little time, while at school, to his
studies. When examination time
came, he continues, three or four days
of violent cramming was usually suf-
ficient to obtain for him a passing
grade.
There is in this frank confession
encouragement for the youth of today
who finds little to attract him, little
to rivet his attention, while in col-
lege. There is solace in it for the
youth who "just manages to get by."
Distinctions must be drawn, how-
ever. Cojonel House was not a "drug
store cowboy." Though he admittedly,
gave but scant attention to his stu-
dies, his mind was buoy in another
direction. He focused his attention
on politics. While he neglected his
books, this hobby of his he did not
neglect. He lived politics. It was
his practice frequently to go to Wash-$
ington, there to visit a friend whosej

REJECTION SLIPS
To the Editor:
The Inlander continues its policy of
issuing free advice to disappointed{
contributors in its usual patronizing
manner.
Curious to say, this advice, which
the editors see fit to impart to the
bungling young writers whose contri-
butions are returned, might so well
be given to those whose contributions
are published. The artificial, would-j
be artistry which is so apparent ina
most (not all) of the wor of those
individuals whom the editor s see fit to
honor by publishing, certainly needs
to be avoided. .
Be that as it may, the patronizing
air of the Inlander's editorial depart-
anent is to be deplored. Such might
be expected and even forgiven in the.
literary magazine of a high school,
but one conducted by university men
and women ought certainly to be free
from such rank amateurishness. It
is through no fault of the editors that
the quality of present contributions
does not measure up to the standards
set by writers in former years, but,
the editorial department can at least
maintain the dignity expected in the
editorials in a literary magazine.
-IR. G. P..
ALWAYS ADVERSE T
To the Editor:1
Would it be acceptable to The Daily
to hear criticism of their musical re-
views that have been printed thisl
year? It would seem that the writers
of these reviews too often know too
little about music. The performance
of the London String Quartet was one
of the best we have had this year in
Ann Arbor. Surely the attitude of!
the audience should have given the
critic a hint of what music lovers
thought of the music to which they I
were listening.
Must criticism always be adverse?
One would think that a program asj
beautifully and artistically rendered
as that given Friday night, warranted

there was such a mess of Yankee hu-
mor and Persian pants: that co-ed
Glee Club! And well, I don't know
much about this (lancing, but I guess
maybe it was because the music got
out of step. And, anyway, you know
what I mean: you get Harry Lauder,
and then an imii ation of Harry, and
then a Chinese imitation, and, god,
you've got the wrath of God. Of
l course, some of the stuff wasn't so
bad, June Knisley Simpson that had
to get off the poems cribbed from
Wordsworth, and Ali Baba the guy
you could hear what he said, and
maybe the thin fellow who was real
good as a thief maybe . . . Hell, I'm
glad I haven't got your job, gotta
praise a show like that. You better
get ready to resign, kid!"
** *
TrE STUDENTS' RECITAL
Theodore Harrison is presenting 1
Barre Hill, baritone, in his graduation
recital this evening in the School of
Music auditorium. In addition to an
opening group of numbers, Mr. Hill
will offer the complete Schumann
"Dichterliebe," a cycle of sixteen
songs which has rarely been given in
its entirety in this country. The pro-
gram is of exceptional interest.
* * *
"ENGAGED"
The following cast has been select-
ed for the revival of the Minies' pro-
duction of "Engaged" by W. S. Gil-
bert, to be presented Wednesday,
Thursday and Friday, March 10, 11
and 12, in the Mimes theatre:
Cheviot Hill, gentleman. .Neal Nyland,
Belvawney, his friend..James Martin
Mr. Symperson, Cheviot's uncle..
...................Paul Heering
Angus MacAllister. peasant .....
.Warren Parker
Major McGillicuddy, gentleman..
.William Bishop
Servant to McGillicuddy ........
.Philip Brooks
Belinda Treherne.. Robert Henderson1
Minnie, Symperson's daughter...
................... Philip Collins
Mrs. MacFarlane, widow ........
.William MacVay
Maggie MacFarlane, her
daughter .......... Lester Smith
* * *

i

I Iil1U111111111!1111111llllllllL-
SAvariety of tasty
dishes help make
your meal a suc- =
- cess. That is why .
= students patronize -
= our place.
--a
Harmflony I
-
feteria -
508 East Williams
Where the Best of Food -
Is Served.
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THE ORGAN RECITAL
Palmer Christian, University or-
ganist, will offer the following num-
bers at the Organ Recital this after-
noon in Hill auditorium at 4:15
o'clock: t
Rhapsody.......................Cole
Vermeland .................Hanson
Andante...................Stamitz
Variations on "Weeping, Fearing,
Mourning, Trembling".....Liszt
Goblin Dance ...............Dvorak
Prelude to "Parsifal".......Wagner
Air from County Derry........
................Traditional Irish
March (Symphony III) ......Widor
* . .*
SAINT POLA
TheMusic and Drama polumn is

3

A SAVINGS

BULWARK AGAINST HARD TIMES AND MIS-
FORTUNE. LET THIS BANK AID YOU IN
PROVIDING THIS PROTECTION. A SMALL
AMOUNT WEEKLY WILL DO IT.

1

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