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October 03, 1925 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1925-10-03

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, OCT013ER 8. 19"5

a n 1V A i34+i ,[l .r

.-AA B; \ - . sa- a

THF.MICHCIANDAIL SATRDAY OCTBDR , 1925

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.-
Members of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
ispatches credited to it or not otherwise
edited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $3.5o; by mail,
$4.00.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; business, 21214.1
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
GEORGE W. DAVIS
Chairman, Editorial Board..Norman R. Thal
City -Editor .......... Robert S. Mansfield
News Editor...........Manning Houseworth
Women's Editor..........Helen S. Ramsay
Sports' Editor.............. Joseph Kruger
Telegraph Editor. ...William Walthour
Music and Drama...Robert B. Henderson
Night Editors
Smith H. C~,y Leonard C. Hall
Willard B. Crosby ThomasV. Koykka
Robert T. DeVore W. Calvin Patterson
Assistant City Editors
Irwin Olian Frederick H. Shillito
Assistants
GertrudeCB. Bailey Evelyn Pratt
Philip C. Brooks Marie Reed
I,. Farnum Ruth Rosenthal
Buckinghami Milo S. Ryan
Edgar Carter Abraham Satovsky
Katherine Fitch Wilton A. Simpson
Eugene H. Gutekunt Janet Sinclair
James T. Herald Courtland C. Smith
Russell T. Htt James A. Sprow
I Munro Innes Henry Thurnau
lizabeth S. Kennedy John H. Thurnau
Marion 'Kubik David C. Vokes
Walter H. Mack Chandler J. Whipple
Stanton Meyer Kenneth Wickwae
HelennMorrow Howard S. Williams
Herbert Moss Cassam A. Wilson
Margaret Parker Thomas C. Winter
Stanoard N. Phelps Marguerite Zilszke
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANA6ER
BYRON W. PARKER
Advertising..................J. Finn
Advertising.... ...T. D. Olmsted, Jr.
Advertising.... .....Frank R. Dentz, Jr.
Advertisig ...............Wi. L. Muln
Circulation................H. L. Newman
Publiation............Rudolph Bostelman
Accounts.................Paul W. Arnold
Assistants
Ingred M. Alving Frank E. -Mosher
George H. Annable, Jr. Julius C. Pliskow
W. Carl Bauer Robert Prentiss
John H. Bobrink Wm. C. Pusch
George P. Bugbee Franklin J. Rauner
Elden W. Butzbach Thomas Sunderland
ames R. DePu Wm. H. Wearne
Myra Finsterwad Eugene Weiberg
Oscar A. Jose, Jr. Wm. . Weinan
I. E. Litte
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1925
Night Editor-THOMAS V. KOYKKA
Welcome, Michigan State,-for
the first time we welcome you
under your nw name. This will
be our twentieth meeting on the
1ootball field. We expect a hard
gane, hard and clean, and we
hope that that spirit of sports-
manship which has existed in the
past between Michigan's two
great educationa institutions will
always continue.
DO WE PASS THE TEST
Today Michigan opens another foot-
ball season, during the course of
which five major institutions of
learning 'will send teams to Ferry,
field. Each game will bring to Ann
Arbor thousands who will support
the Maize and Blue, and thousands
more whose interests and sympathies
will lie with our opponents.
These thousands who, on various
week-ends, will visit Ann Arbor,
many of them for the first time, will
come here as guests of th University,.
-guests of the student body. This
is especially true of those who will
come here to support opposing teams.
Whenever 40,000 to 50,000 people
are gathered in any one place, it is

likely that there will be some breach
of good manners,-that in the excite-1
ment, some one in the "home" stands
will forget that those across the field
are his guests. Evidence of this,
even in college communities, is given
each.year the country over. Even in
the East, the so-called cradle of all
that is fine and good mannered,
"boorishness" is sometimes evident.
The step taken by Syracuse univer-
sity toward curbing such actions is;
therefore much to the point, and
might well be copied by other institu-
tions. In an effort to further friendly
and sportsmanlike relations with
their visitors, Syracuse gives to each
spectator a printed slip of "hints."1
They read, in part, as follows,:
"The teams who come here to play
and the officials who conduct our
games are the guests of the univer-
sity. We owe it to Syracuse and to
ourselves to see that they are all
treated, at all times and under all
circumstances, with the utmost cour-
tesy and consideration. In this con-r
nection, all the spectators are urgedt
to co-operate in seeing that the fol-
lowing suggestions are observed:
"1. Please refrain from aidress-
ing remarks to players, the bench, or
the officials.
"2. It is inevitable that some de-
cisions must be close. You may not
agree with the correctness of some
of them, but the officials are in a bet-

should hold himself

responsible.

There is only one rule to follow,;
that is: "Be a gentleman,"-for
such occasions the University is
trial;"-by the conduct of itsf
dents and supporters will it
judged.

and
on
"on
stu-
be

IT'S A SENSIBLE PLAN
When applied to specific cases, old
adages are sometimes quite contra-
dictory. As the two which say "Never
put off 'till tomorrow what can be
done today" and "Act in haste and
repent in leisure." Applied to a given
situation, these sayings have opposite
meanings; applied to the French ne-
gotiations, they express, to an .ap-
preciable extent, the conflicting posi-
tions adopted by the members of the
American debt funding commission.
The funding commissions have
come to a more or less definite temp-
orary decision on the settlement of
the French debt. True, this plan
must yet receive the approval of the
erractic French parliament and of the
over-filibustered American senate,
but it has' received the approval of
the representatives of the two na-
tions. And this plan expresses a
great reluctance to either "put off
'till tomorrow," or "repent in leis-
ure." It is a compromise plan, in
fact, it is a compromise on compro-
mise plans.
When apprised of the proposal,
Senator Borah, the bombastic, said,
"That is still not a settlement; it is
still a makeshift enabling the debtor
-in fact inviting him-to reopen the
whole affair at his pleasure. A final
definite settlement, even at the ex-
pense of concessions from the United
States, would have been preferable to
an accord which is meaningless and
merely a stopgap."
And, to a certain extent, Mr. Borah
is absolutely right. What he says
about the plan being merely a "stop-
gap" is not denied; Mr. Mellon's offer
is admittedly a temporary expedient
to prevent the ,rapid accrual of the
interest on the debt, and to provide
for a comparatively small refunding
of the principle. In this way, the
actual settlement of the matter will
be delayed for five years, but during
those years this country will be re-
ceiving what was apparently the
maximum amount of French repay-
ment for the immediate future. And
after the expiration of that time,
France should have reached a more
settled financial state, the Dawes'
plan will have either proven or failed
to prove its worth,-and the world
will be better able to judge the abil-
ity of France to pay.
It Is seldom advisable "to put off
'till tomorrow," but in this case such
action may save the United States
from "repenting at leisure."
DETROIT TAKES THE LEAD
Detroit is making notable strides in
its attempt to establish the "airplane
capital of the world."
Although its latest step-the ordi-
nance regulating flying over the city
-may at first appear a bit premature,
it is indeed a commendable one. It
recognizes the coming field of trans-
portation. It also recognizes the fact
that inasmuch as the air is sure to
come into regular commercial use,
the federal government will in time
make provisions for air traffic. The
new ordinance states that in case the
federal government does make any
such regulations later, the city's or-
dinance will automatically become
void.
But in the meanwhile, the ordi-
nance regulates the flyer's altitude.
This is a practical rule, for it was not
long ago that two aviators were killed
there by low-flying. One of the planes
crashed into a flag staff on a down-
town sky-scraper.
The new flying rules aresnot De-
troit's only eveidence of activity in
the "new sphere." Various contests,
such as the reliability tour, are under
way.

There certainly can be little doubt
about Detroit's resources for the new
endeavor. A natural step, one would
think, would be from automobiles to
airplanes.
More power to Detroit, the pioneer.
Students at Michigan State college
are now receiving instruction in the
intricacies of the Charleston. Per-
haps waning interest causes this
dance to be "farmed" out.
"Surprise the folks! Make Phi
Beta Kappa."-Daily advertisement.
And all you need to do is to buy a
certain make of fountain pen?
Will Texas always be henpecked?
Mrs. Edith Williams has announced
that she would like to succeed "Ma"
Ferguson as governess.
"Council Proposes Cheering Section
at Foreign Games"-O. O. D. This
ought to interest the students of lin-
quistics.
"Throws Acid Into Face of Ex-
Wife"-Free Press headline. He was

OTED RLL
AS WE
WERE
SAYING
(Being the continuation of the
Report of the Sub-Committee on
Dating selected at the Spring
meeting of the National Pneuma-
totherapeutical and Phrenological
Society. Copies of yesterday's
issue containing the firt install-
ment may be purchased at this
office at the usual price.)
Having, in our previous discourse
attempted to make clear to the mem-
bers of this society the technical
language used by the practicers of
dating we are now about to plunge
into the main body of the report.
But before we do this we feel that
it is vital for the proper understand-
ing of this report that your commit-
tee explain the methods which were
found necessary to make such a re-
port possible.
First of all the average date is
practiced by two parties,-the male
and the female (or the man and the
woman, as they are sometimes called,
although Springfoltz finds cases in
which they are known as boy and
girl. See "The Fundamentals of Pill-
Rolling" by Springfoltz, McMillan,
1843.) 4In these cases the man, as
we will designate him in this report
for the sake of clearness and brevity,
is usually the instigator, i. e. it is he
he who requests the woman or girl,
as we will call her in this report for
the sake of clearness and brevity, to
accompany him during the course of
whatver period of the day or fraction
thereof he designates.
* * *
The girl usually accepts (Bollitz
cites several cases in which the girl
refused to go, thus not bringing
about a date, but he clearly explains
that these cases are abnormal and
quite rare).
Thus bringing about a date. The
requests for a date on the part of the
man are usually made at some time
before the date is to take place, al-
though there are usual exceptions,
when dates are made on the spur of
the moment. These are in many cases
the most worthwhile, according to
several members of both sides, who
were interviewed in this regard. 4
* * *
In order to make such a report
possible, it seems obvious that we the
members of your committee, found
it absolutely necessary to partake of
these dates ourself in order to get
at first hand the material necessary
for this report. Each date was care-
fully recorded and we believe that
the reports are vital to those who are
seeking knowledge along this line.
We are, therefore, about to give the
detailed accounts of some of these re-
ports. Of course at the outset, all of
the dates had to be of the "Blind"
variety, as we had not previously
made the acquaintances of any girls.
Thus the first few cases which follow
will be of the above mentioned vari-
ety.
* * *

AND
DRAMA
TON I( tr: Barry Conner's "Apple-
sauce" in the Whitney theatre al1 8 ',':
o'clock.
* * *

TWO COMPLETE
COLLEGE STORES-
BOTH ENDS OF THE
DIAGONAL WALK

'111E OTU IIE II ALIEF

A

As you probably do not know, it is
only due to a private local boycott
on music that Paul Whitema n. who
is to appear in Orchestra hall, De-
troit, Monday evening, is not ,also
presenting his orchestra in Ann Ar-
bor this fall. After his two hugely
successful concerts here there is no
reason why he should not pack Hill
auditorium the third fine. It is mad
dening ...

70'7 N. Vn(ersiIi % AN 4. Phone 212

~~A9 FAC tO
5

HAis
FARCTR

i
i
I
I
I
i

LQt A .I' U 01 t 11 AT'--
I Ieryoll e else does!
keep it looking FIT.
\\ Clean and block lHats and do
tlu m [I I CIIT. YouN will appreciate
, o ,:;, hat doiw over hfre rom odor
a??) in tIw N% orkimmilke manner in lilvicoo'k
whichv~ edo xoi'R
\ ,o a r dSell 1 ats equal
to the ' t. ; stock of atest shapes
al. 01 ha id in all sizes. Hats
i e lto fit li lica d free of charge.
;?y Dol;r or More .at the
EAC~hV LL' STORE
P B;ekard S rd P hone 7Ii,.
(Win eve P. 1'. R.. '1ops at Slte St.)

U.OFM.
Dial 4505
L LADIES WORK A R
E SPECIALTY E
N S
I BASEMENT WUERTH ARCADE I
N N
G G
R E P A LR I N G
WORK CALLED FOR AND DELIVERED
}a
ornwell a- Coal -- Cokie
Scranton, Pocahontas, Kentucky
and west Virginia Coal
Solvay and. Gas Coke
This business has been growing ever since it was established.
The secret is "GIVING ABSOLUTE SATISFACTION
TO OUR CUSTOMERS."
We believe it pays to do business in a friendly way. If you
think so too, let's get together.
Cornwecll'== Coal -- Coke

r
.

fil whi~linall

In any case, if you have not already
heard him, you should certainly .o in
for his Detroit-appearance. Ile is, in
a very large measure, to America
what Balieff is to Rus:ia. .A s rious
a tist antd a terrie t a shutas t i' of
the stage, in act nal performanec Ih
assumes all the elaborate noneh-
lance of the little Armenian at lis
best. Ile does not hurles o his cow.
bell music, however, and like a. ruth-
less maitre d'ecole he put,1 it irough
every gruelling fil lip kovn to he
most rigidly classical orelstry.
Outwardly there is nothi g aboutI
his organization to i tei ( ober
rime or rhythm, but if you lo 'X close-
ly you can see every play:,er's body
subtly swaying to that unmoral syn-
copa(timon, !and Mr. Whlitcemns ti
left leg gluivering like ji lo to the
dry-driuk magc, the ngroid rack&
of his rag-time blues.
* * *
"TI!E .P'O II N "
A review, by Frederick Ziv.
All too often we hear the mournful
apologies o unappreciated playnm(rs.
belying their failures because the
roles had no opportunites in them
Ali, if only the learGC would give
them a real part! But for once such
pathetic cxplanat ions are inpossible

'LEASE
DON'T
M
PATHS
c .RO

Phones 4551 and 4552

Office, Cornwell

Block

m

lk®

I I MMNMP

CASE I -if, indeed, there is alny nteed for
Patient: Miss Fifi Gilch. them--because "The Poor Nut," now
History: Miss Gilch or "Fifl," as in its sixth month on Broadway, is
she prefers to be called, told us that the combined efforts of Nngent senior,
she was 22 years old in her stocking and his talented son Elliott, whose
feet, and was six feet three inches in spectacled personality is the Foor
height. She gave her weight as 76. Nut himself.
We met Fifi in a Polish class. She Imagine a seventeen collar on a
spoke Polish fluently, she said, but fourteen neck, narrow trousers, a
her father was a plumber and wanted high pinchback coat, and a studious
her to take 'ipes. She seemed quite appearance--in a college town. It's
pleased, and nearly . broke up the impossible, s0 they call hilm the Poor
meeting of the class when we asked Nut. Imagine a fellow with sorinter's
her for a date,' to use the technical legs, in the midst of the usual rah-
terms. When asked what she rah spirit, devoting his life to the
preferred to do that " evening, she study of algae, and there you have
made some reference to her neck or the Poor Nut.
throat, so, believing her to be in pain, But Margory adores his admirable
we thought it best to attend a movie. determination in dedicating hinself
(We learned our mistake later.) to the algae (she doesn't know that
During the presentation of the the scum on stagnanitpools is no
cinema, Fifi showed a decided prefer- more or less than algae); and .1ulia
ence for the lower forms of comedy. just loves him because she hates
She particularly seemed to enjoy "Spike" Hoyt (for the moment, you
scenes in which persons of great understand), and Julia can seo big
weight were seen to fall down landing things. She can get himt a job in a
on various parts of their persons. At broker's office where he will make
one point, when a very small gentle- money, and not become just an in-
man received a pie full in the face, dersa laried instrucI or, interesteud
and seemed quite annoyed by the only in scum.
event, we thought that we would have But the Poor iNit wijs the big mact
to remove Fifi from the theatre to the for Ohio, (it seems inmpossible), for
Psychopathip ward. However, she the glory of dear O. S. 1. and that
calmed down sufficiently, later to per- sort of thing. Of course they all
mit us to guide her from the auditori- knew he could do it, or didn't they?
um. On the way home she discussed And he was so brital, just think of it,
the picture. She referred to it in he spiked "Spike" Hoyt: Julia just
such glowing terms as "Elegant,". loves him.
"Grand," and "Swell" and on my bid- But. of course, he marries the right
ding her good night she thanked me, girl; he doesn't want to be like col-
and referred to the evening in the lege boys; lie doesn't want to he al
same terms. In fact she seferred to bond salesman and make money like
practically everything she or we men- everyone else; he'd rather just st'do
tioned in these terms. algae, the poor nut.
The next case which we would like * *
to cite is a much more complex one
as it involves the additional elementsIAN71"THE TFLIP"
of the Sorority and the League. As a point of toIaieal interest
We feel that the details of this case "I L'Irelandesa Rosa dell' Abie," now a
are perhaps too delicate in their na- in its fourth year in New York and
ture to be brought before this society its twenty-second week iin Dietrmi
as a body, but we will be glad to give opened last evening i1 Boston to

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SLICERS
We are- 'headquarters for the most popular garment on the campus
;nd are showing all styles in YELLOW and OLIVE KHAKI for
Ldics, men, boys and girls. Cur prices will interest you. See Tower's
new transparent Kit-Coat. Also Cravenettes, Gabardens and Topcoats from
$15.00 up.
SUED,.E AND. LEATHER
JACKETS
BLAZERS AND BLOUSES
T- cool veather demands one of these. We have them in large assortment
for ladies and men. Can be had in Suede, Reindeer, Horse-hide, Corduroy
-nd Wool Plaids of many patterns, lined or unlined, in the best grades only

h
A

as produced by the leading

outing garment manufacturers.

Priced from

$9 5 up.
all kinds, in Corduroy, Whipcords, Serge, etc.
Also Moccasin Packs, High-Tops, Hiking- and Hunting Boots,
Shoes and Puttees.
0. D. Wool and Blanket Shirts, Underwear, Swea_ Gof Hose, eavy
and Light Socks, Overalls and Coverall 5uits
B ANKETS, AUTO ROBES and STEAMER SAW LS

I Jcv is blanket time.

The cool nights are here and ou need extra coxer-

i-. We have them in soft Wool Double Blankets in mwny sies leavy

Robeo and Army Blankets.

Our large assortment and eseialy reason. le

prices demand your attention. NT
BLUE NAVY PANT.

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