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January 13, 1926 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-01-13

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Y, JANUARY 13, 1926

THE MICIGCAN fDAILY

WORLEY OISCUSS ESMonarchist Strength Causes
Hornhy To Fear Assasination
STrEAM A IONs TO LCTUR HI E
een r cri (c8 II A 1 xk O .r....,:.:>::::>: e i'4 ii e WIork Prev ents ,Smith And
W ltsa1 [bi' A<,rii.A,.. :::........ .;;." _..::::::::..:_..:,m _ __-. _ ._ n U n

Continue V ork street. It will contain threestories
On N ~ev School will be devoted to offices, the second
to laboratories. and the third to an
For R esearch ;observation hospital containing eight
Cold weather is-not materially in-W.
terfering with the construction of the f
Thomas Henry Simpson Memorial forI,
Medical Research, and according to CHIROPODIST AND
Dr. P. M. Hickey, of the University ORTHOPEDIST
hospital, the building should be ready 707 N. University Ave. Phone 21212
for occupation late next spring. The _

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,raton n ,aFs Tht iL AR iidpi n,
Not Iiivention
PAPIN WAS PIONEERI
Prof. John S. Worley of the civil
engineering department completed his
third group of lectures on the history
of transportation yesterday morning,I
when he related the development of;
the steamboat.- ,
in chronologically treating the ev-
olution of the modern ocean lier,
.Professor Worley pointed out that the
first application of the steam engine
for the propulsion of vessels to be au-
tomatically recorded was made by
!lapin in 1690. This French engineer
continued his experiments for a num-
ber of years and finally constructed
a small launch which was wrecked
before it could be fully tested. A few
years later Jonathan Hull, an Eng-
lishman, followed up the work of Pa-
pin and successfully equipped a small
boat with an atmospheric steam eng-
ine.
In regard to Aherica's part in the
development of the steam engine, the
speaker pointed out that the first voy-
age to be made in this country was
on the Potomac river, conducted by
James Runsey, and preceded the fam-
ous trip of Fulton by more than 20
years. This trip was followed by the
successful, though small, ventures of
John Fitz and Captain Savery of Nvew
Hampshire.-
The next important process in the
development of the steam boat was the
invention of the screw propellor. Dan-
iel Brounelli, Frenchman, was the first
to suggest the use of piopulsion by
the use of vanes under the ,water, al-
though his idea was advanced and
improved by John Fitch, Robert Ful-a
ton, and others.
Concerning the generally accredited
inventor of the first steam propelled
vessel, Professor Worley stated that
"Robert Fulton has been erroneously I
credited with the invention of the
steamboat. His work was more that
of adaption than of invention."
For more than ten years the future
navigator of the Clairmont studied
a painting and sketching in America
and in England. However, in 1793,
he became interested in the improve-e
ments in England's canal system andI
in the steamboat. Graduafly he be- r
came involved in the study of naval' ii
architecture, although he had no train- I u
zing as an engineer, and in 1802 he T
constructed a model ship three feet
long. With this craft he investigated a
the proper proportions for the various n
dimensions of a well designed ship. c
These proportions, which he later ap-. d
plied to the Clairmont, have since been s
declared correct by naval architects.

Pinhot From Appea iring On
Oratorical Program
NOEL IS PQSSIBILITY

-1,.,11 .,F +1. ,, ..1.,«+ t. .. .. t__.___ ..._..,._.,.fa_

Officers of the Oratorical associa- snel or e piant nas Deen complete:
ticn have abandoned all hones of se- for some time and work on the in-
curing either Gov. Alfred E. Smith, terior is progressing rapidly.
of'New York, or Gov. Gifford Pinchot, When completed, the memorial will
of Pennsylvania, as the tenth and con- be unique in that it is the only build-
eluding number of the season lecture ing in the country devoted exclusively
course of the organization and an ef- to the study of pernicious anaemia, Its
fort will be made to secure a first construction and maintenance are be-
class speaker as soon as possible, ing made possible by a gift from Mrs.
it was announnced yesterday. Thomas H. Simpsons of Detroit, in
Prof. Thomas C. Trueblood, chair- memory of her late husband. Pernic-
man of the speakers committee of the ious anaemia is a disease the cause
association, made a special trip east of which is unknown and before
during the holidays to try to arrange which medical science is still compar-
a date for the spring with either one atively helpless. In Dr. Hickey's op-
or the other of the governors. The imion, an institution of this nature can
governor of the Keystone state ex- accomplish much in combating the
pressed regret that he could not come malady, and he believes that with the
to Ann Arbor in the near future be- building's opening, Ann Arbor will be-
cause of his work with the legislature come the center of all research in the
and because of the great coal strike matter. The endowment, which rep-
which is still in progress in the an- resents a gift of more than $400,000,
thracite region. Governor Smith ex- provides that should a cure for pern-
cused himself because of his work icious anaemia be discovered here or
with the legislature and the many elsewhere, the fund shall be used by
duties which demand his time. the medical school for research into
At present the Mt. Everett prodgc_ any subject deemed advisable by the
tion is being considered for the tenth faculty.
attraction. In it Capt. John Baptist The memorial is located at the cor-
Noel, who went with an expedition to ner of East Catherine and Observatory
Mt. Everett, gives descriptions and
presents motion pictures to portray to
his audiences the experiences of the -r oir T A r Es
expedition. The production has prov -I THES
ed popular both in this country andT W EK
abroad, according to reports. It play-
ed for four months, afternoons and Eves. - 50c to $2.50
gn.ARRI C Wed.Mat. 50c to $1.50
evenings, in a London theatre. K Sat. Mat. 50c to $2.00

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Matinees Daily 2:00-3:30

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\
INTRODUCE
Thursday-LEWIS STONE4

Because two plots for restoration of the monarchy are gaining strength,
Admiral Nicholas Horthy, regent of H'rngary, is being closely guarded
against assasination. Archduke Albrecht and Otto, son of the late king,
are the figures plotters seek to elevate to the throne. New photo from
Budapest shows how Horthy is protected when he appears in public.
CFHCAGO GOOD ROADS CONVENTION
DRA WS THJOUSA ND S TO EXHIBITION

Military Society
Initiates Seven
Scabbard and Blade, national hon-
orary military society, held its annual
banquet and formal initiation Sunday
night at the Union. Seven men were
initiated into the society at that time.
f r~l~ney orn. .'f~hricL1'dA1 T. imue 199

LAST WYFK
ALOMA
OG F THf-S OUTH SEAS
fflu.-ilulw Gi U1awai an M tc
Bonst{e ?e lay1 u hn.MtoC&
woodward at Eliot Tel. Glendale 9792
The BONSTELLE CO.
In tbe Most Thrilling, Exciting
Laugh Play Ever Written
"THE MONSTER"
By Ctane Wilbur
Schubert eeunf!n Lafayette at Shelby
la a / YV eNight, 50C to $2.50'
Sat. Mat., s0cto $2
Pop.rhurs. Mat.Best Seats$1.5o cadillac 8705
GAY, GQLD EN. GLORIOUS
Blossom Time,
'14Ie lde ti B'roadway Cast

Blachrd ttndsileeingToDisus 1They are: Christian T. Andersen, n6;
BRalalrd Attends ieeting Tq Discuss exhibition of road building machinery' Roy H. Callahan, '26; Eugene F. Card-
Development Of Highway System land equipment hase been set up and well, '26E; Landon V. Burt, '27; Har-
And Traffic I oprosement displayed in the great Chicago Coli-old F. Field, '26; and Arthur R. Wood,
Prof. A. I. Blanchard of the civil seum and the three adjoining build- -27L.
ngineiering department left yester- ings. The total value of the exhibits,
ay afternooil to attend the good which amount to more than 300 car- types of roads. Professor Blanchard,
oads convention and exhibition which loads, has been estimated at $2,000,000. who is president of the National High-
5. being held this week in Chicago Among the larger exhibits is one pre- way Traffic association, will preside
nder the auspices of the Amercan ; pared by the United States bureau of today at a joint meeting of this or-
toad Builders association. jpublic roads to show the scope of its ganization and the, American Road
With more than 300,000 good roads ' work. Builders association.
dvocates, highway officials, engi- During the four days of the con-,
reers, and contractors present, the'vcntion numerous sessions will be! MEXICO CITY.-Special dispatches
onvention opened Monday with a held on the problems of highway en- from Tepic in the state of Nayarit,
iscussion of plans for a national! gineering and administration and on report that the bodies of 500 persons
ystem of highways. problns confronting the contractors who drowned in the floods have been
During the last week an enormous in the construction of the various recovered.

1

That I 's Great Goes Without Saying
_ THE ONE AND ONL

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Great CLEARANC of inter Frocks
Specially Priced for
Wednesday and Thursday

NOW
PLAYIN

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v'
0eavs

SILK

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FLANNEI
DRESSE
This sale includes v

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every
reet,
loon,
piece and
traight or
ming s and
ie wanted
achievement in value.

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2:..o aaI-b u i:iZ
00
dure
Proucio's"lanemde -
1Pc, 3ol, 409
7:00 Evening 8:40
Balcony &Oc, lIaIn Floor s
Children 2c

11

type of frock

for sti

dress, school, aftern

dinner or dancing.Z

Ooze-I

two-piece models show st
flared lines, original trimn

varied necklines.

In allth

hades. Every frock is an
ou to shop early.

II' -- '-."M1:,.'2 '-~ 7

I

I 111

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