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January 13, 1926 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-01-13

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~'AGA -WO C

THE UVMTCHG,\r1 DAILY

P'rofessor Clarence .J io Ofers Plans For Proposed S t

...adium........

PREIFERS BOWL TO4
.Nmerous Advatages Of lDesigu Arei
Listed; Safety And Simpllicity
Feature PlanI
TO SEAT 83,00 PERSONS
Designs for a new football stadiumn
for the' University,- seating. 83,000 per-
sons, have been comnpleted(I)y Prof.
Clarence T. Johnson, of the engineer-t
ing college, and a member of the
Board in Control of Athletics, after,
a study of existing stadlia, 1)oth of the
bowl type, such as that at Yale, and
the gallery hype, such as Illinois' new
structure.
The plans have not been formally
considered by the Board, pending the
consideration of the stadium question
by the University authorities. Theli
type recommendled by Professor John-;
{son is bowl-sbaped, adapted to the ty-;

Model Of Stadim Proposed BProfesor

1a
ai
P(
C
al
di
st
til
of

74,000 wido0ws and 275,000 orphans
are immediately eligible for the n ew, 0
ensions, but a large numb~er of those
entitled to claim them have not yet;f
_ome :forward, because they already
ire receiving poor relief from gu ar-;
ians and fear that they will lose'
this relief if they claim the pensions.
"Before the war," prfoessor Hayden;
tated, "Germny was far ahead of
he rest of the nations along this line.
A' relief pensions, hut nowxFngland.
lads. England is far ahead of the
United States."l
ROME. - The Vatican missionar
xhibition, was closed Sunday.
FRATERNITIES
and
ROOMING HOUSES-
Why let broken furniture
lay' around? Let us repair
it for you.
Quality and Workmanship
Guaranteed.
P. B. HARDING
018 East Huron P11one 343:

O oO "sI. .. ., . ''. o " .a^v.O"OO..".«Id" .r."".I~0r r

-By (cour tesy of the Michigan .Alumnus.

The model *of the new stadium proposed by Prof. C. T. Johnson of the engineerin.
seat 83,000 ijersons- and could be erectedl at a mniuinuin cost.

college, Which wouild

pograpJY tiyo elanC d s ufrrunaiU1I
Ann Arbor., His reasons for his' ('inmiestion Is .tr lie "
c h o i c e f o l lo w : -A s t h e s p e c t a t o r s l e a v e t h e s ta d iu m , ' e w L . f r i l e F ~ l z os . ue s a l h s a d a e e n l y b i t b y n e g h c e aJ In'"Ldc~ h e e r nJ (3r l o l l dT h
boring universities, are generally to-; probable congest ion. Parking spac'
cated on level land where extensive may be provided within 500 to 1,000
earthwork is not to be seriously (coi- feet of the stadium. 4'\itli thel)Uyim'it oft1 rtl , In-'1i- al unemployment before the war;1
sidered. The topography of the comi- Quarters for the contest irig teams sion uinder the niew law brought about* to-diad ihe unemployment is differenit
try about Ann Arbor is favorable to. mnay be built uinder one of the api- by tai{, l kwin refornis thiere is OLii and the governmnent has to pay much:
the construction of such stadia as proaching walks leading toward the extension of I bec old p~ension law more than prviouslti en as
may be found in California or thle one end of the playing field. Tfoilets may phirewaiousleant,1)thisin191,''ndg y axs.'
completed last year for the University be located under the roadls which aacwhcordi n toeProf. pased n . 1'Hayden t s.w"eiin a a rm
of Pittsburgh. The advantaiges of the proach the two larg<.e seating areas,.ftelOiia slnedprmn. sdb h;ao gvrmn fRm
simple type, concrete resting oni earth,! Spectators standing on the outside c.f << l s ased,." lie saidi "on the ol1(1 se y \Iclonal(1, but was delayed by
are many. Some of these are euum- the stadlium would see the boundary idea: of having contributions nmade by financial exigencies. It is part of the
crated in what we believe to be their wall wic~h would rise and fall in the state, employer and emnployee to pirogram for national insurance
order of relative importance. igraceful curves. The widle pathways ,the government bureau through which' against unemiploymient, sickness, old
I. It is im~portant that any struc- app~roachiing the stadium and grassy the pensions arie then distribted to age and (death, which applies to all
ture be designed and built so that it slopes would complete the lpicture. tepol h r lgbefrde.wreso ohsxserigls
may be easily modified to mneet the ,T~ie areas abotit the stadium may be Ii 1912 a 'Dole wras begun bw thle state than 2.110ponswhcis120a.
needs and 'deires of those who follow beautified b~y planting trees andeah 1te a dl)ulswic is$.0a
whereby ec ftethree ia yeai r r--approximately 15,000,000 work-;
us. A stadium without a gallery may, shrubs, classes contributed and the pensions rs It is estimated that it affects 70;
be extended ° by providing new seat-; For the sanme seating( area, a struic- I were then under the operation of the: percent of the entire population of
ing areas onl the same slopes, farther' ture of this simple design would costI law andweentmrlchiy.Te te'iedigo.Temnsryf
from th cente of thefield.This i rom on-half t threefthens wasucdevised onthethes nor-edhealth nestimatesestthats approximatelyel
means simply anl extension of thei as would one with a gallery. Con-
original plan. If a gallery is built in sidlering that a s adiium is usedl'butj
connection with first construction, four or five timies each year, and ini'
those who follow us, have but little' consideration of the reasons already
opportunity for m aking extensions or given, w e believe that the sim ple plan ! th r i o ii t o s A gal r mu t w l ma e al a p a to ll n e e tdaso b sc e ed y s me o t -fg t- o a n w s a ii i.;
tractive construction, which is often
expensive and which must be rem oved+
to provide space for enlargements. C GE
11. Many people are attractedt
football games because they like to ffhI
see the great audience. For this rea-
so spectators should be, able to see .S E~S IAK
the entire audience from any place
in the stadium. A gallery ma~kes thisj Appear ing in the Congr essional
impossible. A gallery must be care-litR(co(d of the 69th Congr ess for Tues-;
fully aesigned or it will interfere with ta n ,o ae11' sa n
the vision of those who are to bes
seated under it., Columns must be o emetwe b Cniesa
pro i~ld, ith he estdesign~, and lDyer, of Missouri, addresses the chtair
l~oiewt h ethnia oin the following: "Mr. Speaker, I ask
(each column is a serious handiare-
maysettr.unanimous consent to extend myreR
~;ietyIsin I~r~lmarks in the Record by inserting
III, A stadium supportedl on the It herein anl address delivered by Sergio
earth is safe. It never falls. Ally!' n, rsdetpo epreo ,h
elevaed sructre rquirs irspIc'Philippine senate and special repro-;
elevae~l trucure equies ispec sentative of the Philippine legislature
tion with the, lapse' of years. Ef
IV ogsin (eeos weeto the Unitedl States, which was de-! V ogsin dvlp hr
rodfrmagleyjithsfinilivered before the University of Mich-1 Uii+ 'j
lower levels. This should be avoided. ig tAnAbr ~ihgn"-
V. Te cst f manteanc is This speech appears on page 1,192;
of the appendix of the Record onl the ;.
duced by eliminating the gallery,. am la;
bym thete adpino}hesml ein._____________________
VI. The first cost is much lessened -___________________
The cost of seating space in a gallery "
is _comnparatively high. . TONAYIS SPECIALI
The illustration shows a (lesi grni
which~ harmonizes with local topog-
raphy. On the scale shown it would
seat over 83,000 people. The number; CH1ICKEN'
may be reduced to any figure (desired!S N W C
by shortening the radius of the out-!S N W C
)side boundary circle. The larger ca- (Hbonie (Gooed) m orer ore your m oney
parity has been representedI to show*
the possibilities of that design. "IT ' ~1F n e tP p r u n
The audience approaches the stad-I
lai on eight walks, each from 80 to elap s Swet ora -v m m
100 feet in width. 'These join a circui-6 a y m n y
lar "road 30 feet wide, immediately Q
outside of the stadium. The spectator' o
follows the circular road until hie
finds the short stairway leading to the l o o n ' '.lc
aisle near his seat. The outside THE ARBOR FOUNTAINMlo o G KH n yP c
boundary wall is about ten feet in;C 1 tj
height. It my be of ornamental brink' 313 S0. 'STATE on , wrs ase @
with a stone coping. __________________________________

711 N. Univ., 2nd floor

LAST TIMES

Matinees
2:00-3:40
Prites
1lOc, 25c, 35c

AL,
AO

Prices
IlOc, 50c

THE PICTURE THAT SUCCEEDED IN SPITE OF THE DEVIL

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-A 1) )EID
WUERTH SYMPHONIC
ORCH ESTRA
WURLITZER ORGAN
li.illis im Skeu$i, organist

Il F E All
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A Good Comedy
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