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November 21, 1925 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 1925-11-21

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER

21, 1925

+ ai ~i 4i-i

THE MTCHTAN D AILYSAURDYNOVMBR 2, 92

Published everyTmorning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student ublications,
Members of Western Conference Editorial
.Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
*itled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished therein,.
Entered at the postoffiZce at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
mnaster General.
Subscription by carrier, $3.5o; by mail,
$4.o.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; business, 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF(
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
GEORGE W. DAVIS
Chairman, Editorial Board...Norman R. Thal
City Editor..........Robert S. Mansfield
News Editor........... Manning Houseworth
Women's Editor .............Helen S. Ramsay
Sports Editor.............. Joseph Kruger
Telegraph Editor......... William Walthotir,
Music and Drama......Robert B Henderson
Night Editors
Smith H. Cady Leonard C. Hall
Willard B. Crosby Thomxas V. Koykka
Robert T. DeVore W. Calvin Patterson
Assistant City Editors
Irwiu Olian Frederick H. Shillito
Assistants

Gertrude E. Bailey
William T. Barbour
Charles Behymer
William Breyer
Philip C. Brooks
L. Buckingham
Edgar Carter
Carleton Champe
Eugene H. Gutekunst
Douglas Doubleday
Mary Dunnigan
ames T. Herald
lizabeth S. Kennedy
Marion Kubik
Walter H. Mack
Louis R. Markus
Ellis Merry
Helen Morrow

Margaret Parker
Sanford N. Phelps
IEvclyn Pratt
Marie Reed
Simon Rosenbaum
Ruth Rosenthal
Wilton A. Simpson
Janet Sinclair
Courtland C. Smith
Stanley Steinko
Clarissa 'Tapson
Henry Thurnau
David C. Vokes
Chandler J. Whipple
Cassam A. Wilson
Thomas C. Winter
Marguerit Zilszke

reduced to a minimum by Janette's
actions. Frantic efforts to avoid pub-
licity have so long been accepted as
evidence of guilt that such efforts on
the part of the state parole commis-
sion can have but one meaning in the
minds of the people. If the commis-
sion can support its policy of freeing
criminals right and left, it is about
time that some state official took it
upon himself to acquaint the people
of the state with these reasons.
A new interpretation of a public
servant's duty to his state may be
found in the reported answer of
Commissioner Janette when asked
why the September and October rec-
ords of his office have been withheld.
"You'll get nothing from me; I don't
want to see you again. Don't come
back. I'll give out nothing," he in-
formed newspaper reporters.
If the parole commission is acting
for the good of the state, it can have
nothing to fear from newspaper pub-
licity. If it is not acting for the good
of the state, proper action should be
started at once to force it to adopt a
sane attitude on the subject, to throw
open its records, and to acknowledge
the fact that no elected employee of
a democratic state can defy the peo-
ple of that state,-from whom he de-
rives his authority, his office, and his
salary.
WORTHY OF THE MAN
Though the proposal of founding a
$5,500,000 university to honor the
memory of America's war-time leader,
Woodrow Wilson, has failed to receive
the approval of the late President's
widow and of others in close touch
with his family, those supporting the
plan are still eager for its consumma-
tion. Mrs. Wilson's refusal to give
her support alone could not be con-
sidered a condemnation of the pro-
posal, for she has opposed all pre-
vious plans for commemorating her
illustrious husband's work. But the
plan has other objections, even more
weighty.
To be a true memorial, one which
would prove a lasting tribute to the
President's work, a sum far greater
than that proposed would be neces-
sary. Five millions of dollars would
scarcely provide the physical equip-
ment which a university such as the
proposed Wilson university, to be
built on the Virginia bank of the
Potomac, would be expected to have.
If such an institution were to be a
true memorial, it would be :expected
to assume and hold a place of leader-
ship in the field of American educa-
tion. And yet, experience shows that
age, traditions, vast equipment, and a
faculty which includes within its
ranks leaders in the field of education,
are necessary for any such institution
rightly to assume an influential place.
Not only would vast sums be neces-
sary to provide a proper physical
plant, but sums proportionately large,
in the form of salaries, would be ne-
cessary to attract leaders in the
various realms of scholarship.
Beyond question, Woodrow Wilson
was one of America's great presidents,
and it is fitting that his work be mark-
ed by a lasting monument, but until a
memorial worthy of the man can be
provided, it should not be attempted.
The building of such a tributary can
best be left to another generation and
for a newer date, when America has
come to a fuller appreciation of Wil-
son's work.

T~~ OATDROLLY
LITTLE BROWN
JUG HOW I
LOVE THEEL

11

MUSIC
AND
DRAMA

P

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t.

s.

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGES
BYRON W. PARKER

Advertising.... _............. .J. Finn
Advertising........T.D. Olmstd, Jr.
Advertising............ Frank R. Dentz, Jr.
Advertising..................Wm. L. Mullin
Circulation................H. L.BNewman
Publication............. Rudolph BosteIan
Accounts.................Paul W. Arnold
Assistants
Ingred M. Alving F. A. Nordquist
George H. Annable, Jr. Loleta G. Parker
W. Carl Bauer Julius C. Pliskow
John H. Bobrink Roert Prentiss
W.1T. Cox Wi. C. Pusch
Marion A. Daniel Franklin J. Rauner
James R. DePuy Joseph Ryan
Margaret L. Funk Margaret Smith
Stan Gilbert Mance Solomon
T. Kenneth Haven Thomas Sunderland
E. Little Wm. J. Weinman
rank E. Msher
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1925
Night Editor-WILLARD B. CROSBY
CHAMPIONSHIPS
Two Conference championships will
be determined in Ann Arbor today:
this morning teams representing eight
Conference and three non-Conference
schools will race over the new Varsity
course for the Big Ten cross country
championship; this afternoon Minne-
sota and Michigan will meet on Ferry
field to decide the Conference football
championship.
Michigan welcomes to Ann Arbor
harriers from Illionis, Indiana, Iowa,
Minnesota, Northwestern, Ohio State,
Wisconsin, Notre Dame, Michigan
State, and Marquette. The University
is justly proud of the privilege of en-
tertaining these men, who, in a larger
sense, may be said to represent the
highest type of athlete.
Michigan also welcomes the hosts of
Minnesota, who have traveled far in
the hope of returning to Minneapolis
with the traditional Little Brown Jug
and the football crown of the West.
This will be the sixteenth meeting of
the two schools on the gridiron,
Michigan having won eleven and tied
one of the previous contests.
Though today's contest means much
to the supporters of both teams, it is
safe to say that neither team will
present any excuse after the game is
over; the teams are two of the finest
that have ever represented their re-
spective institutions. One team must
lose, yet there need be no shame, no
humbling of the spirits, for the sup-
porters of that team.-
Two teams will meet on Ferry field
this afternoon to decide the Confer-
ence championship. The victors are
to be congratulated, and we trust that
the losers may be even more highly
commended for their .display of spirit
and sportsmanship.
JANETTE DEFIES THE STATE
There is an old fable regarding the
self-important fly, who walked up and
"glared defiance" at the elephant. The
action of Fred E. Janette, paroled
commissioner of the state of Michi-
gan, who refused to make public the
records of his office on request, and
who failed to offer even a pretense
of a reason for such action, is strange-
ly reminiscent of the fable. The pub-
lic which Commissioner Janette re-
fuses to consider is the agent which
pays his salary and elects the admin-

Well, we suppose everybody is all
excited abodt the game. The jug has
been repainted and the snow is off
the field (No reports as to stands) so
all we have to say is that may the best
team win; but if the best team isn't
Michigan-well that's a different
story.
Last night at the pep meeting held
at the Field house, because it is fur-
ther from the Maj and other vulner-
able points about town, the team was
given a big send off on it's long trip
to Barton Hills, near Ann Arbor,
Michigan, where the game will take
place this afternoon. Pep meetings
are wonderful things in their way,
but we still are dubious about their
exact purpose. Not that we doubt
that they have one, but we can't seem
to find out just what it is.
* * *
It has been pointed out that in case
of rain or snow during the past few
days, Ferry field would be unusually
well named.
s* s
MLLE. 'SNOJIP ENTERS ACTIVI-
ITIES. GETS PERMISSION TO
TRYOUT FOR COMEDY CLUB
AND OPERA
Famed Michigan Co-ed Receives Spe-
cial Consent Of Regents To
Join Local Clubs.
WILL NOT JOIN MIMES
Ann Arbor, Mich., Nov. 21, 1925.-
Miss Effre (Kid) Snorp, undergraduate
girl student at the University of Mich-
igan, today tried out for about every
society to which she is eligible. Comedy
Club tryouts were held in the after-
noon, and Miss Snorp recited the Old
Testament of The Bible as her piece.
In spite of the shortness of her se-
lection, Effie was unable to graphical-
ly present her emotional largeness
and the bigness of her personality.
Although no reports have been is-
sued as to those elected to member-
ship, it is quite certain that Miss
Snorp, or Effle, as her intimates call
her, will be taken in, as the laugh
which she got were token enough of
her popularity among the members,
even though they had never seen her
before.
In a statement issued to the Affiliat-
ed Press last night, Miss Snorp stated
that under no circumstances would
she accept an honorary membership
to Mimes.
"I won't be a copy-cat," she is re-
ported to have said. "If Dorothy
Stones wants to join that society,
that's her business, not mine."
When asked whether she would have
joined had she been offered a mem-
bership before Miss Stone, she replied
in the affirmative.
"Mimes is a good thing," she said.
When asked whether she would try
for the Opera, Effie declared very defi-
nitely that she would. She is quoted
as saying that while she might not
have the voice she certainly had the
build for Grand Opera.
Miss Snorp weighs 357 pounds,
Eastern Standard Time.
INITIATION.
A fat officer of the law
Watching
A dozen healthy specimens
Of what we (by courtesy)
Call Iomo Sapiens
Making a mudhole
Out of a public
Thoroughfare.
Theorem:
Similar trigngles
Are all alike.
An alumnus with lotsa degrees
Attended the games at his ease
Saying "I want no more

Than just two feet by four
On the fifty yard line, if you please."
0 Wattan S.
We have heard many wierd stories
of bootlegging tricks, but the scalping
game right here in Ann, Arbor has
them all beat.
One foxy gentleman, for instance,
had his tickets very neatly displayed
on the breast pocket of his coat and
was selling mums. The tickets we
learned went with each mum, and
these rarest of all flowers at football
games sold for upwards of five dollars
a piece, depending on the time of day
and the appearance of the customer.
A local newspaper ran a contest re-

TONIGHT: The Glee Club Concert
in Hill auditorium at 7:30 oclock.
TONIGhT: "Deiire Under the
Elms" by Eugene O'Neill in the Shn-
bert-Detroit Opera House at 8:15
o'clock.
"ABIE'S IRSH ROSE".
A review, by Robert Henderson.
. ... And yet, "Abie's Irish Rose" is,
after all, a good play. In this man-
ner:
Its plot is puerile, stupid; its acting
in the main-the priest, the Cohen,
the Irishman, the two bridesmaids
forty-seven apiece-ridiculous and
conventional; its situations are a long
line of gags hoary with Plautus and
its pathos is the bathos of "East
Lynne." Solomon Levy is choked with
emotion at the mention of his wife:
to muted violins off-stage. Little Rosy
Murphy connotes Ireland with the
gods of Saint Patrick. Mrs. Cohen
stalks to the wedding with the brass
knuckles of a lady of the evening. And
worse, there is a conversion between
a rabbi and a priest-the moral of the
piece-as soft and as nauseating as a
plate of pancakes.
Conversely, there is the occasional-
ly adroit acting of the boy and the girl,
Mrs. Cohan and the rabbi. And there
is the very beautiful interpretation,
even subtle and convincing, of Joseph
Greenwald as the father.
But more .than these, more than the
appeal of the Irish-Gebracht complex,
more than the oddly pat lines or the
soft sentiment, it the old warhorse
situations, as venerable as Aristo-
phones and the compedia del' arte,
as constant in Jonson as in Sheridan
and in Shaw, that have turned the
trick of this "homely farce. The tra-
gedy of Mr. anol Mrs. Cohan is only
the comedy that you will see in Hol-
berg's "Beggarman" later in the year
and call the pinnacle of broad art;
the slapstick of the Irishman and the
Jew is only retold in Bernard Shaw's
"Great Catherine"; and the unfortu-
nate lovers forced to the ruse of mis-
taken identity is as ancient as Arios-
to's "Supposes" and Farquar's "Beaux
Stratagem". When you laugh at
Solomon Levy making a dive at Pat-
rick Murphy you are not compliment-
ing Miss Nichols but Fletcher and
Masters and the whole gallery of im-
mortelles enshrined to the dusty
archives of university scholars, and
re-applauding the obvious nonsense of:
their rowdy genius.
Someone, in final anathema, has
called "Abie's Irish Rose" as bad as
"Uncle Tom's Cabin." But then
"Uncle Tom's Cabin" is a good play
too.
* * *
"THE SWAN"
Final arrangements have just been
completed to present Jessie Bon-
stelle's production of "The Swan" by
Ferenc Molnar in the Whitney theater
Monday afternoon, November 30, at
2:15 o'clock. The entire production
will be brought to Ann Arbor, and the
cast will include Miss Bonstelle in the
part of the Queen Mother and Jessie
Royce Landis in the role of the prin-
cess, played by Eva LeGallienne in
New York.
* * *
PENANCE
And to attone for the infamous
heresy at the top of the column may I
repeat that 'Saint Joan" to appear at
the Whitney theater Monday evening,
is one of the most overwhelming plays
I have ever seen: in every sense it
stands alone. Save for such produc-
tions as "The Miracle" and "Cyrano
de Bergerac," "The Cherry Orchard"
and "Children of the Moon," New York
has seen no more brilliant and amaz-
ing performance than this master-

piece within the generation.
Jla Arthiur
Joan in "Saint Joan"
While it has not been pointed out
in the criticisms, the thesis is an at-
tack on the authority of Rome and the

At Both Ends of the

Diagonal Walk.

MAN N 'S cOAIN
FACTORY MADE
Means Skill and Quality
in Our Shop.
Save a Dollar or More at the
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard Street. Phone 7415.1
,(Where D. U. R. Stops at State .St.)}
1 I

r-

THE
GREY
Corier Liberty
and Maynard

Special Sc
Football

ervice

for

Cuests

Hot Lunches

11:00-2:00

5:00-7:30

Sunday Evening Lunch
4:30-11:00

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F

PLEASE
DON'T
MAKE
PATHS
ON THE
CAMPUS

For Continued Good Health
Consider Good ]ionie Cooked
Foods Essential and
Come to
Johlfs
Dining Rooms
714 Monroe St.
One Block South of Campus
Just Off State
Tables for Workmen as Well
as Students.
Board by Meal, Day or Week

Special Ofer
We will allow you $1.01) for-vour old fountain pen on the pir(chi ase
of a new pen of ay of th dfollowing makes:

PARKER
WATERMAN
9 C

SHEAFFER
CONKLIN

Graham's Book Stores,

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Under New Management

I-

EDITORIAL COMMENT

1

HARVARD IN DEFEAT
(The Manchester (Mass.) Union)
It is a blessing to the cause of
American education that Harvard can
be defeated in football with compara-
tive ease. It is a blessing r to the
cause of education that Harvard, Yale,
Princeton, once the. only football in-
stitutions in the country, long the in-
vincible football colleges, can now be
defeated by very much smaller insti-
tutions.
It is lucky for the country that the
earliest colleges to develop football
were the ones that did it. For it is
plain to even those who neither run
nor read that though Harvard is now
rather inconspicious as a football in-
stitution, it has not stepped down
from its throne as the great mother
of American education.I
Had some university less secure in
its position been the first great ex-
ponent of football and then had been
deposed, the effect would have been
unfortunate. For the popular stand-
ard of measurement of a university's
excellence would have been its
prowess in , athletics. The smaller

4.

1'

colleges, when suffering a period of cently for the two most beautiful girls
eclipse in athletics, would have found in Ann Arbor to appear as bridesmaids
li.fl i. in a*.rtin. h i in "Abie's Irish Rose" which has taken
ijiae ijijexi in anae Lin tue,.---------------h-has taken- -

iittie Denentit n asserting inei rl ui -a
scholastic worth. The public is not over the Whitney for the next decade
conversant with such matters. or so.
But just as it knows without ped- The necessary qualifications, ap-
sonal investigation, taking it on trust, parently are to be beautiful but dumb.
that it is twenty-five thousand miles * * *
around the world, it knows that Har- Which is about a paraphrasing of

i
s.
i
f

I

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