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April 05, 1925 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 1925-04-05

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PAGE TEN

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, APEITr. 5. 1925 1

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDA, APIL 5 1_.

Traveling Alone Through South Africa, The
Adventures of a Woman Zoologist From The
University During Her Search for Specimens'

Flier and Historian W ill Tell Story of the F rtG o eC rl n l*g t H r h rd

1

By -Robert 1M8I1stieIII
Publicity has quieted dlown, and

BY Leonard C. 1.111I
Women have assumnedlia position of
increasing importarince inI the fi(1(1 of
natural science during the past dec-
ade, but until very recently t hey have
confined their activities l-argely to lab)-
cr atory r esearch and thle collect ic,,i (>
natural history s')cimlens on a 3od (st
scale, Admitting ambit ions s cientific

(lureda Ituu~bei, uf razor-clans fromt the staff of the Zoology department of ' there is little mention heard of late
1 , watme -coverecd surface of a sandy i the University in 1905- now teachingi concerning the United States Army
1 :ach. lie seenrad2 them by letting in- the RhodesI University College at aviators who blazed the aerial trail
dlown a wire into their pits, pulling' Grahamstown, presentedl her with a' around the globe. Their epoch maki-
them; out wvhen t I;e shells closed upon valua ble collection of reptiles andl as- ing exploit was widlely extolled dur-
i= " i listedl in further collection. Miss' lug the flight and immediately fol-j
lI ma I consolid; tion of the spei- I "Winslow also receivedI 200 lots of1 lowing its completion, and then, with
1)c:; ill Wllingtcen revealel to Miss I nmed shells from Mr. H. C. Burnup the usual casual attitude of hmanity,'
'Vin slow that she hadl collected more (Aofthe Natal Museum at Pieterm'ariitz- the matter was relegated to the lback
than 200 ,pce(' of reptiles and am-? burg. Some of the shfells were co- of the public mind, and life went se-

;rialn of tho Palestine and Arabian
camparigns., and was3thle dis)coverer 1of,
Colonel [.awre1znceĀ°, the mystery mnu
of hel,' as'tt who Ibuilt lip an arm11y of
20,01)0 Bedout: in the desert.
j['ren tIhe 25,000 feet of moltion lpC-.
tlil' Wll md(luring; therbipl, he
l se lec ted SO:Imll 4,000
feet, _'1'Nfl ill augmenlc t the t illins with
''sill ntires',; on)(,of them in llcolor,
d1:1 ing lthecomi, 'r o ihelectture. Thec
It .'; ore viii begin;lv ii a,['sc..ript 101
Si, ih , igiI 01 tle pln ad will"
('S I-v 41 oli i ti rout th, 1lelut re voy-
d iii lsuc .1a; the "t ITnley ra)bbit's
t a U'', lgtin:; the 'woolies' in 1)utch
I I;; he, (1'enmieswith the bhairy
I in' i 0! :: and le Geisha girl:, of
bging(,"'lood at a native.
e~~~~i inpe.tl " it, aerial 'st owaway',
an' ;nn~ the:;of like nature. The
(I';i:'tcol ics a ad dn erS sl ';I c tered
xil),, t eet d a so by tile' spea kers.
Vi'em !a1a e;i iiat monal a n(piit the
I eel i i a l ':cul(t hli':VC of vd 1110. Ill
ji bra. go.'aplly and s;cienlce, 1?inch.
1 Olel a ~ e ulled froma it. School
ib id; 'i i; mnyof, the cities being
'~j a yth ipeaikcrs Iiave been
givena s'c vial perrorinec ufor thre
r,' l, ,, ;' OtIhese subjects,

expeditions to di stant fields to be U:,
exclusive domain of the male. Indli-
cation that the order han.'eS is ;f-
forded in the ;nc('ssful (ci;pleion
recently of a 6000 mile sinie-l anded
collecting exped it jei, "w'cnplshed
by Miss Mina L. Wislow, cuat o'o
molluscs in the Museum of Zoolo.y
of the Unversity. Leving Ann Arbor
in April 1924, n a yea 'sn leave o
atbsence, Miss Winslow devoted hie
six months stay in South Afr ica to the
collection of zoologicall specimens for
the Museum. Her particular interest
lay in the accumulation of representa-
tive molluscan series, but through ti. a
cooperation of resident cllectors ui
by individual effort Miss Winslow re-
turned with a sizeable array of in-
sets reptiles, andl ampibians in ad-
dition to many fine (shell ,series.
On her journey to South Africa,
Miss Winslow made a short. stay in
England, sailing from London on a
Union-Castle steamer, touching at Las
Patinas in the Canary Islands, A~cen-
sion Island, -and St. Hlelena, arriving
at "Capetown May 19. At Wellington,
fifty miles from Capetown, Miss Wins-
low met a fried, Dr. Anna G. Newell,
a former faculty menmber of Smith
College. Dr. Newell, who was senior
lecturer in Zoology at Huguenot Uni-
versity college at Wellington, was
able to provide Miss Winslow' with
letters of introduction to many resi-
(ent scientists, who were of assist-
ance in her work.'
1-Ir first trip on the continent was
a railway journey of 142 miles north-
ward to the great Victoria, Falls in
Rhodesia. Miss Winslow Combined;
business with pleasure, collecting,
many specimens of fresh water snails
in the Zambesi river above the fall:;
dluring a stay of several days. S:o,
also visited the Zimbabwe ruins, the
truncated rer ins of at fortress, gold
mine or temple recognized to 1)e o
great antiquity, its builders unknown.
The fortress surmounts a low eleva-
tion near Victoria, South Rodesi,
constructed of hewn granite blocks
placed together withut mortar. Mis;
Winslow remiarked that in the region
about the Falls baboons slouch amiong;
the bushes and the monkeys chatte
from the trees, both quite tame.
Returning southward to Mafekin:;
in Bechuanaland, Miss Winslow enter-
edl upon the most strenuous period 0'
her stay, beginning the first leg of a1
collecting tour, which carried her bac ;'
in an easy (ircle to Wellington.
Frorn Mafeking in the center of the'
continent, the naturalist woked east-
ward and southward by way of Pre-
t oria, Johanneshburg, ['et ernaifiv-
burg to Durbani on the Indian Ocea.
Collecting, and travelling by short,
stages 'she worked along the edge of
Basutoland, inort hito lBloemfontein,
thein eastwardI again, meeting the
,cean at Ept London. Along' the'
southern shore thirough- Grahamistown,
Port Alfred, Port Elizabeth, .Jeffrey's'
Bay, G eorge, and ack to Wellington,
completing the 6000 mile circle.
Adding constantly to her stock of
specimens through daily collecting
trips, Miss Winslow often worked far
into the night pireparing them for
transp~ortation. She peroically mailed
them in small boxes to ter friend in
Wellington, consolidating t hem later.
Miss Winslow indicates Ithat her time
was fully occeapied with eeting 1)e-
1)1, and with collecting and lprpar-
ing specinmens. Boiling' and cleaning:
snails, drowning andol preserving rep-
tiles, papering insects and occasion-
ally stuffing them with cotton con-
sumed a large hurt of her time.
She found natives unreliable and of

l)hiiafl ; anl ;ndeteii-inmate number of tYl~es niamedl by or for M~r. Bui'nup

.hells, includling many complete serie s hmef There are -those, however, to whom1
.;Louring !age differentces and endlless A collection of nests of trap-doorI the flight is a never ceasing source
c'olor v.ariations; a sizeable body 01 ;spiders was presented by Frank. Ci'ii- of wondcir, and there are also those
1iinsects, including many ants and but - den of Port Elizabeth. Mr. C'udeni whose curiosity regarding the (details
Iterflies; the wh~ole filling six boxes' a~ has made the collection of such nests of the first aerial circumnavigation
(:cheC;t nd a, truink. Among the maol- his hobby andl had arranged _a cone- has b~een piqued with no thorough sat-I
luses are a series of land snails, as,,! prelrenisive disnlay of the architectural isfaction. Those two groups in parti -
large as ciubls, which were picked up! accomplishments of th spider. cular will be especially interested in~
h beneathi the trees at the forest edge. Among the nests given were some the announcement of the Oratorical1
r Of particular interest fr'om the evo-I speimens with hinged doors weight- association that a first hand story of
loit ionary standpoint are the fourt ed with. mud, while othei's had a the world flight will be told in Ann
., -pc('imens of Perin'atopsis, amarry- forked-tumde entrance equipped with a Arbor by one of the fliers and by the
t legged aninil measuring about twoj webr net which closes automatically official historian of the flight. "Smil- rI
_ inches in length, that is supposedl toI behind. the insect. Mi'. Cruden a-I ing Jack" Harding and Lowell Thorn- i
be the link between, the worms and' com~panied the gift with a series of as, the historian, will appear in Hillt
1insects in the evolutionary se ries. notes on the lbabits of the spideirs. auditorium at 8 o'clock Thursday night,
MissWinlowfoud teirat h~e or-i .s A Duban 'iApril 9 to describe, verbally and with
I Mis Wnslo fond tenmat te fr- A D rba, Miss Winslow was as- h i fmto itrsadsi15
IeSt edlge, nrear Grahamstown. rteado oinpcue n lds
A yungch~neeon nw rsidngsilted in her work by Dr. Gordon Caw iereakbewokwt wihte
A yong haieicn, ow esiingstern who heas often collected fresh-jthreakbewkwihhchhy
in the Zoology Museuin as the pet of ! water snails for Dr. Bryant Walker were variously connected.
the taff, is pexliap ; one of the first ef lf Dtroit, honorary curator iU the Both Harding and Thomas will ap-!
of his kind to 1)e brought alive to Museum of Zoology at the University-, I pear ot,'the program, collaborating iiu
G this count ry. Miss3 Winslow conveyed Dr. Cawston leas been studying the the telling of the story. Mr. Hlard- f
lie, (luring the long journey to Ann Biliarzie, parasite which affects man, luig's personal version of the flight, is
Ai bor in a special carrying box. In 1 and has as its intermediate host cer- one te-nse with thrills. 'There steems
cold weather a hot water t ottle serv-tain speices of freshwater sn'ails. ; to bhe a feeling prevalent in some
ed in the absence of the African sun.. During her travelling about' South circles that no rislws were i'un by the f
The chameleon measuores about seven Africa Miss Winslow covered but a fliers in naking the first tourl around
inches and is two-thirds grown. In short distance by motor car althougli the world. This impression is or-e
color hep shows x':niations fi n a pale there are excellent roadways in rsome1 roneou~s. There was never a minute
green with white stripe, to dark green parts of the country, the reason being- during the official flyiilg tone of 1711a
with lavender streakings. H-is out- that gasoline sells for a dollar a gal- hours that the fliers were not in gravel
j tanajing characteristic rests in his Ion, and mnotor transportation therec- danger of accident or possible death',
"yes, which: ejnect from a politicn fore is expensive. There were few gas, and there was never a minute dur-
high on his head, and we-rk independ.-- stations. ing the entire trip when there were l
ently so that: h a ecan stare re'arw ard The large ?mart of the 6,000 m ilcs, 'no "thrills" for the fliers. M r. Ilmn';d-ao g h s s ii ri h t e r g t o b n a c o n si d o h al a s o n el h u a i e o h p c i
fat the same time gaze fixidly at an ap- ' which' Miss Winslow had the higlie' t adventure, and he and Mrl. Th.on as
preaching fhy over his snout with the praise. She indicated that tbey co have ,pr'epaedl a prograin whichr
left, His rood consists entirely of p,,re f avoriably with the Amnerc~i s 1hould prove of wide and insiieag i3 -
jflies. When feeding time arrives Miss! lines in all respects except speed. Thb terest.t
Wins~'low> grasp,, a fly with a pair of rl fI62rie rwCae w to JakIrdnisaatvof'Ptn-
forcesklalding gue insecr t t1adis-,VitoriaoFa42umilizdtresesrm tt-~ akhardng is a ntive ior aTele-
0 -eb, ~ iC(..- Vctoia all utiizeI tree ~ eseethesonof n inentor nd le t
tance of three or four inches from the and two and one-b*If da)Js . trical engineer. An early leaniifg
chameleon's mouth, lie eyes it slowly!I slowest leg proved to be the 6-2 mi - toward mechianicas.led hiz to talke a
swinging his l:ead, and in . a flash I i-un between Jeffirey .Bay ano Poi-t twro years' cour'se in crglnecring A
flicks it fr'om the instrument with thej Elizabeth which consuamedl seven %Tanderabilt university, followed byi
tip) of his tongue. The tongue will hours. lxnmediately Upon her arrival so-tne raaauing at tiae tTAIverpsity of
etend, four 'Inches unon eccasion. at Capetow-n Miss Winsitow purchased '
IWinslow also br-ought back alive a' passage for 6,000 miks in the form <4 Warkdngs of Iproliit'ion aio 'the Stat! 5
sirall South Afrnican land tortoise. a composifte ticket. Tlae Southa Afri- ' Sou~th Africa -is iitrested in the m.:'e.
Muclh valuable assistance was givenj can Railway provid-es a 2l er ecut ment.E
the zoologist.,(during her stay by soy-! touiist reduction and allJows unlimited 1 Comuplcting prepay"Itiolls for ship-
(-oral scientsts residing in the cities (stop3-over privalegc"s. 'ment of hier' -s pciilEns Miss Wins-
!on h-tem' route, to minst of whom she1 In lBloeinfoutein, 'thie naturalist, was.I low. sailed from _Capetowan, touching
1Carriedh letters of introduction. Prof. I intervie-wed by the Chief of Police, at Liverpjool, ard alwiviin in Ann Ar-
J. E. Dnerden, who was a rnemnber of! who desired a deta4.ed ~account of the bor 'On the seventh' day :of March.

Te~nnessoe Enlisting in the air serv- (el more than 3,00)0,000 in t by lt'(iitd-
ice, lie trained as a buck private at!j States and abroad. buringthe warz ,

the inechanic's training schrool at St.I
Paul, kater Winning his "Wigs'' at!;
the* Wilbur Wright fie1(1 at Dayton,F
Ohio. Tlhere lie was rated as master
signal electrician and avration mick-
aniciain. It was his sunny disposition
and invariable smnile which earned for
him the sobriquet of "Smiling Jack"I
from his comupanions of the voyage.
Among time early flying experiencesl
which brought hint to the pud~ic eye
was one of the first Atlantic to Pacsific
fligMs, muade in 1919.
Lowell Thomnas, chosen by the gov-;
ei-nm ent. as the man best fittedo to act!
as historian of the flight is a traveler;
atnd explorer of considerable renown.:
His ent ire lire ha s been (devoted to
adyenturous unflc'ri ti;s, and thereE'
are feiw cor ners of 1 lie globe whilch lie'
has not., vi.sited. Enthusiastically in- 11
terest -(I in aviation, he has flown overI
amny coliptries in tbhe world, aandt
mun1cht of his time (luring them( pa st i1
roy-en yoas , was slicnt, in t hm' coun-
tines over wi,,,'h the, fliers passed in
t; -i. euisc.-
As a- lectur'er Air. Themcia; is in-
ternationally famous, hut ring a-ddress-

he was located1 in France a a
coi respondlent for' an Amneric an paper,
and ats an authnor' ha:; vmtchu
murch tin) literature 0taniravel -aid ex-
lohration.le ha a, vet iittblo eae-
time love fc-r wildl and little k11OXvu -'
corners of thre earth,.lHe was the his-

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