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February 12, 1925 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1925-02-12

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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1925

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE FIFE

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T UENB"EI LE TEAM
stTO TIE WITH tERM11
ONLY SPORT IN WHICH WOMEN
MATCH SKILL WITH
ANOTHER "U"

'Relief Director
Outlines Russian
Education History,
"Russia is a cross-word puzzle, and

4

Intercolleglate competition opens
this week for the Michigan women's
rifle team, when they match their
marksmen against those of the Uni-
versity of Vermont. The score cards
will l1e shot during the regular prac-
tice periods this week in room 330
Engineering building, and Saturday
night these will be mailed to the op-
posing team which has followed the
same procedure. The shots will be
taken in the prone position only.
This is the only sport in which the
Michigan women's athletic teams are
given an opportunity to match their
skill against that of other colleges
or universities.
.PLAY ICITIAL A E
OFBAMUTBALLSEIES
Victors in the first games of the
interhouse basketball tournament yes-
terday were Helen, Newberry resi-
dence, Westminster house, Alpha Phi
and Gamma Phi Beta.
In the first and closest game the
Yl hien Newberry team defeated that
of Kappa Alpha Theta by a score of
15 to 14. Excellent playing was shown
on both sides with Marie Van Osen-
bruggen, '26, starring at left guard
for Helen Newberry, and Florence
Wolfe, '28, left forward, and Elsa
Ohlmacher, '25, right guard, carrying
.'off the honors on the Theta team.
Phi Sigma Sigma was defeated by
the Alpha Phi squad by a score of
17 to 4. Helen Rutherford, '28P, was
distiguished by her excellent work
at right forward for Alpha Phi, while
Miriam Olden, '27, also showed skill
at left forward for Phi Sima Sigma.
In the third game the Westminster
team was victorious over that of Ad-
elia Cheever to the tune of 12-7. The
playing of Emma Goodwille, '27, was
noticeable at the position of left for-
ward for Westminster, while Kathryn
Francons, '28, at right forward, starred
for Adelia Cheever.
Theta Phi Alpha was overcome by
the strong Gamma Phi Beta team with
a score of 42 to 2. Beth Hibarger,
'28, and Mary Stewart, '25, on the
Gamma Phi Beta forward line were
the stars of this game.
The second series of first roun d
games in the interhouse tournament
will be played Monday.

4
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i
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the keyword is education; when that!
word is placed, all the rest of the
puzzle will be worked out in time,"
said Miss Elizabeth Bredin, director
of the student friendship fund in the
central part of the United States, in
an address given in Newberry hall
yesterday afternoon.
Miss Bredin, in reviewing the whole
educational situation in Russia from
the first revolution up to the present,
stated, "When the Soviet government
first came into power, they sought to
establish a broader educational pro-
gram. They decided on two things:
first, to wipe out illiteracy and secord.
to establish free universities, without
eMtrance requirements.
"tbis was done to bring the 80%
of illiterates down to an absolute.
minirmmn, and it is hoped that by 1927
this goal will have been accomplish-
ed. To a. certain extent it has been
accomplished already, but it has been
done through ridicule.
"Before th'e spring of 1921, lack of
money hindered to a great extent the
Russian educational program. Teach-
ers were paid by goods, food or cloth-
ing instead of by money. When this
policy was withdrawn in 1921 and
"money and the right to trade" was
finally re-established this educational
experiment was found to be imposs-
ible and examinations and tuitions1
were once more enforced. Russia!
then began their "cleaning" system
and dismissed about 10% of their stu-
dents at once, keeping only those of
high social standing and those who
had done the best work.
"The Russian type of university is
a cross between the German and
American universities and although, in
25 years, it is hoped to be a model sys-
tem, it can hardly be judged at pre.
sent because it is merely an exper".
ment." In comparing the Russian
school with the American Miss Bredin
said that one of the outstanding dif-
ferences was that the Russian spent
more time on his studies, h'e did not
take an rctive part in athletics but
hired professional teams to play the
traditional football and basketball and
he was not actively interested in any
social activity, thus limiting the
"school spirit" to a great extent.
"The grandson of Leo Tolstoy is
about the only Russian student who
has been allowed to leave the country
since I have been* there and he Is
now in a small Quaker college i
Pennsylvania," Miss Bredin said.
"The University of Michigan is known
to the Russian student through their
relief work at Kief when they support-
ed a kitchen for three months there
and fed 1800 students a day."
When asked which American books
seemed to he the most in demand to
the Russian student Miss Bredin im-

90 NEW WOMEN ENROIL
FOR SECOND SEMESTER
Approximately 90 womenn have en-
tered the University this semester, ac-
cording to a reps,:t given out by the
office of the Dean of Women. This
number inicludes 38 who are residents
of the state of Michigan, 4 of Illinois,
as well as representatives of Ohio,
Washington, Wisconsin Colorado.
Iowa, New York, and Indiana.
The majority of these women have
entered with advanced credit, 6 trans-
ferring from the City College of De-
troit. Among the colleges representedl
are: University of Denver. Welleslyj
college, Indiana university Ohio Wes-;
leyan, Columbia, Indiana State Normal.}
.Augustana college of Illinois, and lt.
lollyoke college.
Oily one foreign woman, Miss Doris
Holdrup of Devonshire, England, has
.entered the University this semester.
Many others have applied for entrance'
but they have been forced to wait un-
til the fall term because of time need-
ed to pass through the red tape of im-
migrating.
League President
Improvtes Slowly
Charlotte Blagdon, '25, president of
the Women's League, who has been in
the health service since Jan. 31 ff om
an acute stroke, is doing as well ail
can be expected, according to a re-
port today from Dr. Margaret Sei.1
The stroke is believed to be due to
embolus, and Miss lflagdon will prob-
ably rest for some time, due to over
fatigue and over work.
Margaret Dixon, '25, vice president
of the Women's Leaguv', is assuming
the duties of president during the ill-
ness of Miss Blagdon.

Dean Gives Teas
For House HeadsI
Mrs. Amy Hobart, assistant of the
dean of women, is giving a series ofl
four teas for the heads of the organ-1
ized houses. The first tea was held

Tuesday afternoon. Mrs. Hobart will today will . be as follows:
entertain again on Friday afternoons seniors and sophomores from 4 to 51
of this week, and on Tuesday and Fri- o'clock, juniors and freshmen from 5!
day of next week, to 6. Squads and class managers are
to be chosen next week.I
Women's Club To -
"~All who have 'not signed up for re-
Discuss Gardens quired courses in physical educatitmn
for this semester should do so immed-
Members of the garden section of iately in Barbour gymnasium. All
the Faculty Women's club will miEt should report for class in the regula-
at 2 o'clock today at the home of Mrs. tion gymnasium outfit.
Ei. C. Goddard, 1212 Hill. Spring or-
Bering and planting will be discussed. Junior play rehearsals will be held
Those attending are requested to bring as follows in Barbour gyminasium:
I ccl catalogues, garden books, and lit- today, chorus A at 4 o'clock ,choruses
erature which will help in ordering. 1 and 4 at 5 o'clock,.chorus U at 7:1!

NOTICES
Interclass basketball practice for

chorus 5 at 8 o'clock; tomorrow, chor- will please call Dorothy Currie, 3136,
uses A, 1, and BB at 4 o'clock, as soon as possible.
choruses 3 and 5 at 5 o'clock, chorus
2 at 7:15, chorus 4 at 8 o'clock; Sat- Pci ia members will meet in the
urday, choirus 1 at 9: 30, chorus F' at Portia club room at 7:20 o'clock to-
10:30, choruses 2, D, and 6 at 11 O' night preceding dedication.
clock.
Byappointment, members of the
By apoit mntlneb('s o he Athena nmembers will m'eet in the
junior play cast may receive special Athena club rooms at 7 o'clock to
I assistance from Miss Loomis between ight to prepare for dedication 'serv-
1 and 3 o'clock any afternoon at the-reda s
Chi Omega house.
Members of both women's glee clubs
Senior women should have their will meet at 7:30 o'clock tonight at
measurements taken and place their to Jones school.
l orders for cans and gowns at once
if they are to he certain of having Mrs. Kate Perugini of England is the
I them in time for the Junior Girls' onlv living daughter of Charles Dick-
Play. Measurements are being taken ens. She is 85 years old and has been
now on the second floor of Mack's. All worried all her life that some would
measurements must be taken by Feb. i think her anxious for fame for being
121. the celebrated novelist's daughter.
Women interested in working at the Don't delay-Pay your Subscription
tGeagoe candy booth in University hall todav.

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Uhe Green Tree
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PROGRAMS
TALLY CARDS PLACE CARDS
BRIDGE SETS
The 'ery-Player- Your- Partner Si stem
Conyright 1923.Patent Applied for.
Clharles S. Clark Comuany, New York
The thoughtful hostw s will appre(iate the advantages of The
Every-1'layer-Your-I'artner System. It is not only fair, from the
standpoint of the score. that (very player should have as a partner
every other player.---wvhether good or indifferent-but it also adds
much pleasure to a party fcr each guest to meet and talk to every
other guest.
THE MAYER-SCH AIRER CO.
PRINTERS, ENGRAVERS, OFFICE OUTFITS
112 South Main St. Phone 1404

I

Luncheon, 12-1:30

Dinner, 5:30-7:00
Special Afternoon Tea Menu
Salted Nuts for Sale
Orders Taken for Cakes and Candies

R

nediately said, "Jack London
Edgar Allen Poe seem to be the
popular. Upton Sinclair comes

and
moost
next

&

with his two books, "Jimmie Higgins"
and "100%." But p;ne of the most re-
cent and most thoroughly read books
however is Henry Ford's autobiogra-
phy."
London, Feb. 10.--Sir Anderson Crit-
chett, the King's oculist, is dead,
THE
DELANO KIDDIE
S"OP
4 Nickels Arcade
We Announce
the First Arrival of
IfIATS
Peter Pan, newiest models for
spring----ld and silk cobibina-
tions--Straws in new and at-
tractive shapes.
;sizes 6 to 16
NEW SPRING .DR IEsSE3
Among these we are featuri
English Broadcloth d rs in
many colors and style , ;;to
16 years.

;
I
:
-

NLW!
The cormrbination of a suspen-
der style fLinnel skirt and a
ll!) si.k blouse is decidedly
clever. Ekiit,> are in the smart-
ent ncw shades. $10.50 and
$12.50. Blouses are in plain
colors and stripes. $10.50 and
$12.50.

,-

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7

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hold enough ink to
take your class room
notes for a week. In.
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pen for life because
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unconditionally guar.
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The 46 Special Pen at
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