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February 24, 1925 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1925-02-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY,

FEBRUARY 24,

1925

TIE MICHIGAN DAILY

MOB rIVIC

TUEDA, FBRARY24 1W5 AGJ M

GLEE CLUB TO PRESEN
.RADIO CONCERT FRIDAY1
WILL ALSO GIVE PROGIAM AT
BAPTIST (IUiWJI
IN JACKSON
The University Girl's glee club will
give its second radio concert of the
season Friday evening in Jackson. The!
first concert, which was broadcasted
from the Detroit News station in
January proved highly successful, ac-
cording to the director. The expenses
for these trips are paid by the station
which present the club.
The club will also present a two-j
hour concert at the young people's or-
ganization of the First Baptist church(
of Jackson. A varied program of
seven groups is to be given.
The first group will consist of three
songs, "We're Here," "The Volga Boat
Song," and "Evening Prayer in Brit-
tany," to be sung by the entire glee
club. Jeanette Emmons, '26, will give
the second group composed of violin
solos; the quartette, Ingham S. Sut-
ley, '26 Ed, first soprano, Margaret
Calvert, '26, second soprano, Eunice
Northrup, Spec., first alto, and Elea-
nora Hahn, second alto, will sing as

Wool Embroidery BEUTY SHOPS EPORT
Gives Smartness;
BUSIEST DAYrFR IDAY 1
Marcel, simpoo. maiUcullr -tliese
calls keep the Ann Arbnr beauty
shops busy. Nlost of these calls Ccome
in for week-ends, with Frid1.y leading
as the busiest day of the week. Evi-
dently the average co-ed is not con-
: r', ";cerned with beautification in prepara-
tion for classes since the [Thauty par-
lors report that there is the least
work on Mondays and Tuesdays.
The much berated "bob" is here to
stay in spite of many efforts to re-
introduce the style for hair long
nough to sit on. Trims still remain
one of the main excuses for visiting
3eauty parlors. "We don't 'bob' so
!much any more because everyone is
already 'bobbed' but calls for trims
and marcels still predominate," aC-
; cording to local Beauty shops. It is
too easy to run a comb through tang-
vr r Xled hair in the morning to ever give
"; up the "bob.,,!
Women Students
Ne gleCt PolitiCS

I I r

Wellesley Women I
Feature Rowing 4
On "Float Night"
"One of he best porIts that velles-

NOTICES

ir Elective classes in swim-
i ming will be held at 4 o'clock Mon-
do not is rowing, according to one days and Wednesdays and 4 o'clock,,
of Wellesley's former members. This I Tuesdays and Thursdays, in Barbour1
is made possible by the presence of gymnasium. Anyone interested should

play, and also those who have more
than 3 absences or 4 cases of tardi-
ness.
Junior play chorus rehearsals will
be held as follows: Today, 4 and 5 at I
4 o'clock, 2 and 3 at 5 o'clock, and A,1
13, 1313, C, D, E, and F at 8 o'clock.
Senior society will meet at 7:15
o'clock today in helen Newberry
playroom.
The art section of the Faculty Wo-
men's club will meet at 2:30 o'clock
today at the home of Mrs. A. E. Wood,
3 Harvard Place.
The University Girls' glee club willg
entertain the Freshman Girls' glee
club tomorrow, at the home of Ber-
nice Nickels, 337 Maynard street.
Pay for your Subscription today.

a large lake used almost exclusively
by tie womien of the college. The
skill of the crew is exhibited each
year on "Float night" which takes
place the latter part of May. Golf al-
so is among the sports which play a
large part in the activities of Welles-
ley.
The main organization of the college
is the self-governing organization by
means of which the women pridek
themselves in "managing everything." I
Other organizations of the college are:
the Christian association, the Athletic
association, and the Debating society.
I er-collegiate debates are held with
the various women's colleges. It is
the intention of the college to hold
debates with men's colleges this year
as well.
There are no national sororities at'
Wellesley. Instead there are local
societies, each society having a house I
for meetings. The freshmen live the
longest distance from the campus,
about 17 living in each house. The
upper classmen live very near the
campus which is much larger than
that of Michigan.
The social life of the wdmen is well
taken care of by Saturday night danc-1
es to which men are invited, besides

T O HOLD TRYOUTS

report this week.
The regular meeting of the Univer-
sity Girls' Glee club will be held at
4:30 today, in room 305, School of
Music.
All women in the junior play must
pay a tax of $2 to their group leaders
before Thursday. From this a cer-
tain amount will be deducted for re-
freshments, 25 cents for each time
tardy, and 50 cents for each time ab,
sent. All who fail to observe this
regulation will be dropped from the
the usual parties among the women,
and occasional dances after concerts
given by visiting glee clubs. Per-
mission is frequently obtained by the
women to go to Boston which is only
15 miles from Wellesley.
When asked her views of dhe Uni-
versity of Michigan compared to a
women's college, the former Welles-
ley-ite replied, "I think the ideal situ-
ation would be where the girl could
have both; however, as I feel now I
would not trade my freshman year at
Wellesley for a freshman year at
Michigan."

Portia Literary society will hold
tryouts for new members at 7:15
o'clock tonight in the Portia club
rooms on the fourth floor of Anger
hall.
All wmen interested in public speak-
ing are invited to l ry out at this time.
Tryouts are to be in the form of a two
minute extemporaenous speech.
Mr. Francis L. D. Goodrich, associate
librarian of the University, will give
an illustrated lecture to the members
of the Womans club at 2:30 o'clock
this afternoon at Lane hall on "Some
Interesting American Libraries."
Read the Want Ads

toe

'4

.4
".4

the third group, "Silvia," and "The Women students on the Michigan
Elephant and the Chimpanzee." ! campus, in general know little about
Number four will be a "college Ifpolitics. They are posted to a cer-
sing" by the whole club, and number tain degree in national politics thru
five, a reading. Miss Nora lunt, of newspapers, but when state politics
the School of Music will sing two are mentioned they find themselves
songs, "Pirate Dream" and "Mornin' ; surprisingly deficient. Recently fif-
on Ze floyou" for the next group. The 2" teen women students were asked to
entire club will close the program with name the senators from their home
"It Was a Lover and His Lass" and ;w state, and the congressman from their
"The Yellow and the Blue." district. The results were as follows:
Busses will be chartered to take None of them knew the names of both
the women to Jackson, where they a the Senators, two knew the name of
will be-uentertained upon arrival with " one Senator and the Congressman,
dinner at the church. Are you in doutt as to the trimming j eight were partially sure of one Sena-
you wish to use on your frock, coat tor and the Congressman, and five
W I n s ie nor cape? You could not do better than knlw nothing at all on the subject.
Oman Is Gwe to decorate the garment with. a little The majority of those who were post-
High Bank Post -or much, as you choose-hand eni- I ed to any extent were upperclassmen.
broidery. Silk nr wool embroidery i This ignorance may be due in some
Mrs. William Laimbeer, New York is very smart and adds an individual !part to absence from the home state,
society woman, has just been appoint- touch to any costume. j lack of political discus,'on among
ed to an important executive position Miss Christina Montt, screen actress friends, and the age of the students.
in the National City Bank of New York is seen here wearing an afternoon cos- It m~y be observed that the older the
the largest national bank in the coun- tun consisting of a white crepe student, the iore she is likely to
try and the last to recognize women's, sports dress and a bright purple jlknow ab~out politics, for interest in
business ability by placing one in an ( wool cape. The latter has a wide girdle that field increases as she approaches
official position. She will have con- of black and white wool embroidery the voting age and is about to enter
plete charge of all business done by whicl is very effective. The cape is the world rs an individual upon whom
the bank with women. lined with white and with it is worn the government depends for its sup-
After the death of her husband in a smart little white felt hat trimmed poi t.
1913, Mrs. Laimbeer was assigned to: on each side with white coque feath-
the work of food conservation in the ers Subscribe for ''e Mi lhigan Daily
World War and in this capacity she'
helped instruct in the business of pre-)
serving food-stuffs for shipments to WHITNEY THEATRE
French and Amnerican army camps. TUESDAY, MARCH 3
In this work she won recognition
and on Armistice Day she took her
first position in civil life by becoming
manager of the home economics bur-
eau of the New York Edison company.
One year later she received an offer
to go into banking.
In this new field her first endeavor
was as manager of the women's de-
partment of the United States Mort-
gage and Trust company, and six
months later the business of this'
office had developed so well that the
trust company placed Mrs. Laimbeer
in charge of the company's Manhattan GR E T A'P P
branches. In this woi'k she passed . I
aloxe on matters such as the granting U
of secured loans to business women;Y EaNo
and in opening new accounts.
PRICES: $1:1O-$1.65-$2.20-$2.7i--AIN FLOOR
Test Paints For
Hospital Building

Childrea
Teth

s

.1. .
r

pe

If WALK-OVER'S FIFTIETH ANNIVERSAR'P)

WalkA

-Over

ren WRIGLEY'S after
et them get its daily
breath, appetite and
y want sweet, and
the sweet that's good

springx
Paten
Variety is the Style Spice
in This .Smart Pump
You want a new and different style. Here iti
You can see what smartness WALK-OVER adds
pumps by a tricky variation in design.

Give the childr
every meal. L
benefit to teeth,
digestion. The:
WRIGLEY'S is I
for them.

is.
to

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Happy children-healthy teeth.
Appetite and digestion, too,
aided by

are

Light soft Patent at $10.00

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after everymea ,
fferent Flavors
Al Wig E4al~

*AC A
orcusj
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I 15 South Main St.

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PWqq
ol w

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Paints of many different kinds, to
be used in finishing the interior of
the new University hospital building,
are now being tested. 'Three rooms
have been finished in part, and paint
used in these rooms is heing subject-
edl tosteam, scouring, asd.many oth-
er tests.
A cream color z aint is to be used.

i

kp. - .. -,,, ,

if

"
E
t1I
(

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b

It is surprising how a plant
will brighten a room.
Order from our large assort-
ment of Spring plants.
Phone 115
Cousins & Hall
611 E. University
Your order will receive
prompt and courteous
attention

P"

AT LIBERTY

AND FIFTH THERE IS A

LAUNDRY PLANT MODERN
IN EVERY DETAIL
It is a two story building dedicated
to efficient laundry service. True its
outward appearance has the same
characteristics, as any other building,

._, rr

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but within-

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Y
S
f

;IIE

Ii

V .'. . . . . .
;r , .

I

_._

-..-_.._

i

20% SALE 20%
Pre-inventory sale on
entire stock

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(

The Ensemble Suit
Most popular of all Spring
fashions the Ensemble has
firmly established itself as
a women's.fashion. Our se-
lection is distinctive.

Within there is a spirit of co-opera-
tion which promotes good organiza-
tion. You can notice it immediately
upon entering.
The laundry work done by this
group is excellent. Have you tried
it?
II~~~H I'li' I'

I

Pictures Plaq
Mottoes Print
. . !r

ques
ts

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