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November 20, 1924 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 11-20-1924

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

HBSI SESIN

ti,../ww wr a

II W ., f 111 IISIAM4EA GIs

N ephew Of "T. R- "
Is INew Assis tant,1
N.avy Secretary

nnni~iiSioux Indian Is
C S , ho Judge Of
TO CO NIVENENO V 8 Minnesota ?:Courts

Tap Room Will Be Scene Of
Third Pep Meeting Tonight

BIGELOW TO
ATOMIC

ES

i' J1A. ii4e'Q I5 'AGI7 i

S tudents

Forty Four
by Noted

UDS HIGU

SCHOOL

OPeni; A the first uen school pro-
gram to be held by the Chamber of
Cohimerce thIs year, Otto W. }iaisley.
uperiotende1t of .1the Ann Arber
s.lhools. spoke on the subject of "The
Public School Problem in Ann Ar-
bor."
Mr. Haisley acknowledged the ad-
vent of the University high school as
"having saved the day for Ann Ar-
bor." lie pointed out, however, that
in spite of the 125 students Who are
now being cared for b 1the University
school there is still a serious over-
crowding in the city schools, with
the roll of students steadily mount-
ing.1
"Ann Arbor has grown twice as
fast as was predicted by school au-
thorities in 1920," said Mr. Haisley.
The high school cannot care for any
more students. There is only one'
answer to this problem ultimately,
and that is the erection of two new'
Junior high schools." Another change
which Mr. paisley advocated is the
reducing the number of grade
schools from six to four. The present
grade schools are capable of handling
a greater number of students and a
saving of nearly $25,000 would thus
be affected. The schools which would
be removed should the Board of Edu-
cation decide to cut down the num-
ber, would be the Perry school on
Packard street and the Angell school'
in the sixth ward.'
L. L. Forsythe, principal of the Ann
Arbor high school, introduced the oth-
er principals of the city, among them
being Prof. R. A. Schorling, principal
cf the University high school.
Prof. C. O. Davis, of the School of
Education, acted as chairman. The
Ann Arbor high school glee club with
Frank Ryan, as soloist, furnished the
music.
SEEK ARREST OF ARED
MEN WO OLD AUAUC
Independence, California, Nov. 19.
(By A. P-)-Representaltiv.es of the
city of Los Angeles announced late
yesterday that today the county super -
ior court here would be asked to is-
sue warrants for the arrest of the en-
tire "army" of ranchers holding the
Alabama gates of the city aqueduct
in defiance oft ysterday's court order.
Ctizens of hiks townlre(licted Itht
if Sheriff Cl arles Collins of Inyo

Theodore Douglas Robinson, New
York state senator, is the new assist-

PROFESSORS TO SPEAK
At the 12"th meeting of the Ameri-
can Physical Society to be held at
Ann Arbor, Nov. 28 and 29, forty-four
scientific papers will he presented
by university professors and other
physicists, noted in the scientific
world. The meeting will convene at
10 o'clock Friday morning, Nov. 28,
in the West Lecture room of the old
physics laboratory.
A special feature of the meeting
will be the inspection of the new
physics building which will be on ex-
hibition during the sessions of the so-
ciety. A banquet for the members
will also te given Friday evening,
Nov. 28, at the Union.
The society is composed of physi-
cists from all parts of the country,
four meetings being held each year
east of the Rocky Mountains. These
meetings are usually held at Chicago
but since the new physics laboratory
has been completed it was thought
expedient to hold it here this year in
order to give the members of the so-
ciety an opportunity to inspect the
new building.
Several members of the Physics dce-
partment of the University will pre-
sent papers during the session. They
are: Profs. Oscar Klein, David Den-
nison, 11. A. Sawyer, E. J. Martin, .1.
M. Cork, Geo. A. Lindsay, D. L. Rich,
0. S. Duffendack, and N. H. Williams.
Prof. H. M. Randall, of the physicsj
department and a member of the
council of the American Physical So-
ciety has charge of the arrangement;.

There will be a ,pep meeting of all
men of the campus at 8:30 o'clock to-
night in the tap room of the Michigan
Union. This will be the third of a
series of pep meetings held in the tap
room before football games, one hav-
ing been held before the Illinois game
and another before the Wisconsin
game.
The tap room will be cleared of all
furniture except chairs to accommo-
date the crowd and an orchestra
which has been obtained to furnish
music for the meeting will be placed,
in the center of the room. A vaudeville
ORGANIZES FOR YEAR

;act has also been obtained for the
evening entertainment.
Michigan cheers and songs will be
practiced, and members of the Var-;
sity cheerleading squad will be pres-
ent to lead the noise.
At the last two meetings students
with entertaining ability have perfor-
med for the crowd and tonight it is
urged that any students who can per-
form stunts of any kind be present
for entertainment in addition to the
vaudeville.
At the last two pep meetings held
in the tap room the place was crowded
to the doors with students returning
from the pep meetings held in Hill
Auditorium. Although a small amount
of dishes and furniture was wrecked
at these meetings they were com-
paratively free from rowdyism and
it is requested that the students be
as careful as possible under the cir-

ant secretary of
ceeds his cousin,

the navy. He suc-
Theodore Roosevelt.

Prof. S. Lawrence Bigelow, of the
chemistry deairtment, will lecture at
8 o'clock tonight at Natural Science
auditorium on "Atoms," the first lec-
ture of a series of three to be given
by University professors under the
auspices of Sigma Xi, and the Junior
Research society. In his speech, which
will be open to the general public,
Professor Bigelow will summarize the
main points regarding the atom which
have bcen discovered in the last 30
years.
Prof. Howard B. Lewis, of the phys-
iological chemistry department, will
give the second lecture sometime in
January on "Insulin." The last talk,
'which will take place during the lat-
ter p art of February will be by Prof.
Louis C. Karpinski, of the mathemat-
ical department, who has chosen for
his subject, "Mapping the Great
Lakes."
New York, Nov. 19. - Hamilton
Grange, once the home of Alexander
f Hamilton, is to be preserved as one
of New York City's famous land-
marks.
Little Home I

EINTH OYEN TALKS O N
UTILITYF IBR
Prof. William Einthoven of the
University of Leyden, Holland, ad-
dressed the members of the physics
department yesterday in the Physics
west lectuye room on, "Thin Fibres
and Their Use." This was the sec-
ond- lecture that Professor Eintho-
ven has given here, having spoken to
the faculty and students of the Medi-
cal school on Tuesday.
Professor Einthoven, who is one of
the most noted physiologists in the
world, has won the Nobel prize in
medicine for this year. He was in-
vited to come to Ann Arbor after he
had delivered several lectures in Bos-
ton and arrived here last Sunday. He
intendas to leave the city Friday
morning.

James Irving, of Pipestone, Minn.,
a Sioux, is the first Indian to be elect-
ed a probate judge. He won over a
white opponent.
RONPP CLUBACCPT
ME BES N INITIATIONl
At the annual fall initiation meet-
ing held Tuesday evening in room 306
of the Union, and at various places
on the campus, the Round Up club
formally accepted the following new
members: Stanley Waggoner, Russell
BIrumbaugh, '25ED; John J. Hart,I
'25E; Emory W. Morril, '26D; G. E.
Parker, '27L; L. E. Meyer, '27; Hair-
ry Murray; Vernon Parker; L. F.
Johnson, '25L; Don C. Wheeler, '2E;I

At a reorganization meeting held cumstances in handling sugar bowls
at 7:30 recently in room 321 of the and knives and forks.
The meeting this week 4s being
Union, members of the Mount Clem- held before the one in Hillkaulitorium
ens club elected the following officers and it is hoped that it will create en-f
for the coming year: Alvin Wolfson thusiasm for the pep fest tomorrow
'26L, president; Alton Noe, '26L, see- night.
retary; and Edgar Hahn, '25E, treas--
urer. Plans were laid for the annual
club dance which will be held some
time during the Christmas holidays
in Mount Clemens.
Kentucky To Play
Wolverine Squad Portugal and Sweden have taken
C the first step toward .reducing for-
Michigan's Varsity basketball five eign traveling expenses, according to
will play the University of. Kentucky reports received from the American
at Lexington on Dec. 20. Charges d'Affaires in these two coun-j
The game with the Kentuckians tries. Passengers who disembark, but
will be the second on the Wolverines return to their ship without pro-
schedule, playing the Michigan Ag- ceeding overland, will not be required
gies in the first practice tilt. Coach to pay the usual travelers' visa
Math'er scheduled the southern school charges.!
when negotiations with Yale and The United States was the first

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Laundry
E. Walker, Propr.
922 East Catherine Street
~We Use Soft Water and
Pure Soap
No Alkali or Acids.
Always at Your Service.
We call. for and deliver,

GOVRN ENT0OL SUIT
IS N UOE'S HA
os Angeles, Nov. 19-The govern-
mont suit agaiast tle Pan-American
Petroleum company for cancellation
of leases in the Elk hills naval re-
serae of Cai;'I'ra was closed here
of Ihe federal judge Paul Mc Cornfiick.

Al re
COMMUNITY FlUND DRIVE
LAGS litSIGHT OF GOAL
Rising slowly, the Community
Fund dIrive passed the $37,000 marst;
last night. The town has not as yet
been completely canvassed but all'
indications point that the quota of
$49,000 will not be reached if contri-
butions are not increased consider-
ably. The drive will be carried on un-
til an approximation of the figure set
for the campaign has been reached it
was announced yesterday by officials
of the drive. Many of the contribu-
tions; hive fallen off in percntage this
year, and it is planned to revi as
ranyas essible to ask for the in-
crease necessary to make the drive a{ "'

I i>icra; Phillip R. Miller; B.,
hite, '2se; and G. V. Melaven.,

Princeton failed to materialize. It country to inaugurate a system of
was planned to have a game with passport and visa charges, charging
either of the eastern schools at Cleve- $10 for passports and a similar sunm
land during the Christmas hplidays. for visas.

Lwi

_,

BUG DANCE
NIGHT BEFORE IOWA GAME
FRIDAY, NOV. 21
MASONIC TEMPLE
YPSILANTI, MICH.
SYNCO SEPTE TTE'
AMERICA'S MOST SENSATIONAL
COLORED ORCHESTRA

''
£
.
...

U

)6he iv:

O'o

$5.00 Cash Cards, $4.50
Phone 2721-W

a

n

county attempted to make any arrests -
under such warrants, such action Junior education dues collected yes- success.
might constitute the match which terd: at the table in Tappan hall The Community Fund para.e which
would ignite real trouble in the Los came to an unsatisfactory total in left the Chamber of Commerce Inn at
Angeles-Inyo water war which was consideration of the cass registra- 11:30 yesterday and paraded both on
brought to its most rec nt crisis with Itien. iXembers of the class should Main at. and State st. was (Icciared
the opening of the aqueduct waste senl dues, which are $1, to the treas- a success by the campaign authorities.
gates last Sunday by a- band of urer, Miss Elsie Ralston at 1020 S. The floats representing the work of
ranchers. University. the eleven different organizations in
Collins and district attorney Jeff I-the Community Fund association
hessian both issued statements pre- Vienna, Nov. 19. -- Dr. Rudolph served to give new life to the cam-
dieting loss of life and great damage i ameIk, of Salzburg, an attorney and paign work, it is stated. D an c g o mte
to the aqueduct if the county or the former Austrian Minister of the In-- "
city of Los Angeles moved to oust the terior, today took the post of Chan- Don't delay-Pay your Subscription
r tch rs' " -my Of occupation. celor of the Austrian government. today. . at G ranger.s
llllililliillllll#1"""""""""""""""""""""""""""'""""""'"""""""""""""""""rsdayrFridaydand
LIBETY17111MINI11S Saturday nights..s
Get your tickets for the dances this Friday
r til and Saturday nights early.
0, OF E R HilMB Fr9t Nainalank
- Tickets for Sale at
New York, Nov. 19.-Complete lib- Organized 1863 Slater's Book Store VanBoven, Cress &
erty to each individual dominion as State Street Thompson
to its own development, with hearty -S. Univ. Ave.
co-operation among them all and the w Goodyear Drug Co.
empire in matters of world wide SAV NGS DE ART EN
'olcy through which the Britishema S SAVINGS DEPARTMENTt
Faire will be able to continue to "hold
together" and exert its influence in TRUST DEPARTMENT
the world, Sir Esme Howard, British--
ambassador to Washington, declared
tonight in an address before the Ca-
nadian club here. a , i
Canada especially, he said, "by rea- Oldest National Baik in Michigan -
son of her position as an American I
power, will have an exceptional posi-
tion and play an exceptionally im- liiliiti9liilfililililillilli il l tllllll111I fillilllllU lllll llilllilll
portant part in the future develop-
xment of the British empire." ___-- - ---N ____ W-IN - ~- --
1It will be for her " he added, "to-
Interpret to the rest of us the feelings"
and attitude of the great American I6N1I
republic with whom we not only de- u I
sire, but intend, to live in the most r
cordial friendship and peace in the -
future." As the cool days of Fall are becoming fewer and B rea T h~I
Chicago, Nov. 19.-The dnivee to rd r, and the cold Winter days are becoming a
Ohicago of gunmen, inaugurated by reality, it is time for you to start thinking about a +p VAN
Mayor Dever after Dion O'l3annon, -4
gang leader, was shot to death, was new heavy overcoat. We are carrying, at present, Woe
continued by the police today. a full line of the finely tailored and low priced
Kincaid-Kimball clothing. These coats are the
latestIii style and are made of the best of materials. VIA
,,~. IPriced $35-$5O We take particular pleasure in satisfying our customers.
II RN 111 1
Ii"Eat More Bread" and get it from us so that you can be
NUN, _ 14m11-11 I
#'ni ncauped on our list of satisfied customers. ome
C! 11111
" ^ " It il11 I
a II N11111

SAMPLES
Permanently on Display at I
qGUV WOOLFOLK I& CO.
336 S. State Street
Ann Arbor, Mich.
Designed by
WHITEHOUSE & HARDY
BROADWAY A7 40-'STRET 144 WEST42" STREET
MEmOPO'rrA OPEPA HOVUsR Wo. KNicrisocKER BUILDINO
NEW YORK

0 Paim I

ri

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._ .....

LAST TIMES TODAY-2:00-3:30-7:00--8:30J
JOHNNY HINES in
.!LITTLE JOHNN YfJONES
' gn . , lBased Iupon the
R Dramatic o-usical Composition
by
See:G. M. COHAN
See Johnny Hines, all pep and fun, as
the Yankee jockey forging to victory
in one of the most spectacular horse
- ] races ever recorded on the screen.
This picture, packed with intrigue,'
will hold you spellbound.
CLl OKIn ALSO PA THE
THE CYCLIST" NEW S
m IT!NEES 10e,20". NIGHTS, 10e, 35c

TO3LORRO W

MISSING DAUGHTERS

WITH A ALAXY
OF STARS

NEXT WEEK
JOHN BARRYMORE in BEAU BRUMMEL
AOON
HARLDLLOYD in HOT WATER

Last
Times
Today

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Last
Times
Today

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