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September 23, 1924 - Image 15

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 9-23-1924

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22, 1924

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

23, 124 T E MIC IGAN DAIL

i :I

ILLS FISH
Nl. Y. HARBOR

Eastern Women
Seen Certain To
Sit In Congressl

COOLIDGE BASES SPEECH
ON KNOWLED9E Of FACTS.

Shows fVan~s
x luction of Sea

Behind

[LL NOW IN CONGRESS
New York, Sept. 22.-Fish long ago
re forced to abandon their homes
New York harbor, and now, so
hy has the water become, even the
ip-worm, tough and hardy product
seg refuse, will not live in it, ac-
rdjing to Dr. Charles Townsend, for
entj years director of the New York
Kew members of the Battery fish
nily ae brought in from time to
re in boats with holes in their bot-
ns to admit the water so that fish
- swim around at their ease, said
Townsend, but if the catch is left
thi boats overnight, the harbor
ter that oozes In kills the fish out-
ht. A few of the sensational state-
nts made by Dr. Townsend follow:
'he Hudson River 'is polluted by
vage from 2 1great cites between
any and Nlew ork before the ties
r reach the North or East Rivers.
awdust is choking the trout far
the river.I
he oxygen content is down to zero
he Harlem River.
ho striped shad is a thing of the
t in the Hudson as it is known to
w Yorkers.
o self-respecting shad will ventur
the river to spawn; but, if it does,
vill lose its flavor before it get
7' tar. .
t the end of every New York street
sewage pipe, killing the fish foo
ttherwise would live, breed andt
I Millions.1
he Hudson is filled with sewage,
te and trash before New Yorkers#
n get a look at it.
ost of the pollution is from northc
Staten Island.
h Passaic River is black withl
x 'There isn't a living thing in itl
kcept pestilential death.-
i ons of dollars will be needed to
ore the waters around New York
something like their natural puri-
saId Dr. Townsend. A bill is now
ig prepared for the next Congress,3
c1rment of wich would mean
t sing of the polluted waters of
vYork and otherharbors.
t is notorious that the water in'
T York harbor is filthy, one ship's1
tain told Dr. Townsend, and it has
>ae so bad that the Japanese will
allow their crews to swab downt
r' decks with it. The condition is
1 not to be peculiar to New York,
pllution of rivers and harbors is
en throughout the country. Mil-
tware thrown away on attempts at
Olture in rivers no longer capa-
supporting fish life
4e found the water so bad," said
'j'ownsend, "that the fish supply
li; Aquarium could not live in it.
brought to the Aquarium tanks of
er from the open sea outside of
eHook, loaded up with it an by
s tem of pipes and filters, our11fsh
e lived on that one'supply for 15
USHBBE MAKES
"""A" A"_""" E
le "rosh Bible," published every
r un~der the auspices of the Stud-
ristian association for the guid-
e of all first year men on the
|URs, is now being placed in cir-
aion by officials of the associa-
, according to a recent statement
lorry -'M. Hayden, '25, president.
books may be obtained at Lane
Phe "Bible" this year is consider-
o of the best ever put out by
a association, and contains 170
0 of information valuable to
a who are not familiar to the ac-
ties here at Michigan. It was
cd by Alfred B. Connable,'25, now
Sddent of the Student Council.
re are 3,500 copies of the book
1s. The cover was designed and
l " especially for the "Bible," and
b~ok was dedicated to Mr. Hal C.

lean, secretary of the Student
istian association.
1 freshmen as well as those who,
sugh not underclassm~en, are en-
g he're for the first time, and
h1ave not received their volume,
el call at Lane Hall at an early
aind obtain one.
S. "Buries" Gold
Parliment Is Told
ondon, Sept. 22-Grean Britian
s golht in oath Africa to 1:ay her
debt to America, and America
ies the precious metia again so
will not interfere with the eco
nic life cf the United States,
hick Lawrence, Labor mem ber of
lian nt, said in crjticling the
ld monetary system.
It is almost comic," said Mr.
vrence, "that we employ people

S:
Mrs. Mary 1. Norton, Democratic
candidate for congress in the Jersey
Ciy district of New Jersey, is re-
graded as virtually ure of election.
EXTRACTS ELECTRICA
ENERGY room MINERL
Denver, Col., Sept 22-A method
of extracting an almost unlimited
amount of electrical energy from thel
earth, and which will practically
revolutionize the power problem of
the present day, is claimed by F. R.
Woodward, a mining engineer.
Woodward still ri'tains jealously
the secret of his method, but de-
clares that he has evolved a way of
charging storage 'battries perpetu-
ally from electricity known to be
present in certain mineral ores. He
predicts that in a few years to be
practically all lighting, heating, and
power distribution for the industries
will be made from these perpetually,
charged storage batteries.
151En, he said, some twenty-,five c
years ago, he accidentally discover-
c(l an electrical charge .emanating
from some gold and silver ore, he
immediately sought to make some
use of this, and has been at work
ever since. At the present time, al-
though he believes his invention
might be applied to home use, he
admits that it would be impossible
to apply it on a large commercial
scale.
lead t e Official Annoineenienits
and Campus Ncws in The Daily.

Dayton, O., September 22.-Presi-
i.dent Coolidge's Labor Day address
from the White House, in which he
said that American wage-earners are
living better than at any other time
in our history, was based on an inten-
sive study of actual conditions,ac-
cording, to , Frederick B. Patterson,
president of the National Cash Regis-
ter Company, who recently returned
from Washington.
"When I was in Washington a few,
days ago," he said, "I was amazed at
the eagerness the chief executive dis-
played to know all about labor and
industrial conditions in the middle,
west. I was given to understand by
those close to the President that no
visitor to the White House from any
section of the country, who has an
important position in industry, art or
journalism escapes this desire of the
chief magistrate for industrial in-
[formation.
; "It is for this reason-that he is so'
JAvell informed as to actual conditions.
-that President Coolidge is so opti-
inistic over labor conditions in this
country," cQntinued Mr. Patterson..
"He has amassed a wealth of first-
1hand information. He knows that the
;wheat crop bids fairto bethe best
ever grown, and that all the great
,business enterprises of the middle
west are breaking records for manu-
facture, and are working full time
vwith a full quota of meni.
"With the Dawes-Young reparations
plan actually working and the evacu-
ation of the Ruhr started, he is able
to forecastha resumption of foreign
business which is bound to aid the
prosperity of America. He sees, and
rightly, prospects of a year of real
American prosperity, solid and well-
earned."
CHAMBER OF COMEC
Prof. Ralph W. Aigler of the Law
School, chairman of the board in.
control of athletics, Coach Fielding
H. Yost, Michigan's famous football
coach and director of athletics, and=
Coach George EK Little of the coach-
ing staff will be guests of the Cham-
ber of Comnnerce at a luncheon this
noon.
Coach Yost is scheduled to speak
upon the Yost, Field house and the
shortage of football tickets, while
Coach Little will talk on Michigan's
hard football schedule and the gen-
cral devlopment of the team.
HAVE YOU SUBSCRIBED YETI
READ THE MICHIAN DAILY

New Rule Forces
Coed To Bob Hai,'
Lawrene, Kans., Sept. 22.-Bobbed
hair has scored another victory, this
time at the University of Kansas.
Freshmen co-eds this fall must learn'
to swim as iteIscompulsory for those
who want to take a degree. The s-ame
thing goes for men students. As
bobbed hair dries much more quicklyI
than long hair, many of the co-eds
who Ikad not already visited the bar-
ber now "have gone and done it."
CHICGO ISCOVERY MAY
RESTORE SOT rTOBLIND
ChicagoaSeptember 22-Opera-
tions on various kinds of animals
wvhich, !medical authorities are in-
clined to believe, will eventually
lead to the restoration of sight in
blind persons, have been recently]
performed by Dr. Theodore Kopanyi,
a graduate student at the University
of Chicago.
Dr. Kopany's operations have
been performed on fish, frogs and]
mice, with such success that he

look' forward in the nearlfuture to
operating on some blind human be-
Teoperation is performedby
first binding the optic nerv, an(I the
various veins, severing them, andI
then transferring the two eyes from
one socket to the other, allowing the
severed nerves to heal and join wil 1ii
the nerve in the other eye. l"OI.
several weeks no result can be seen,
but by the end of a month, gradlual
restoration of sight has started i i
every case.
In the case of a blind frog, it was
posible to tell when sight had been
practically restored byy subjecting it
oits sight invariably turns fromn
the light, while a blind frog shows
no reaction to it.
In ext?,erimentmg on mice, Dr.
Kopanylfirst placed a piece of
cheese several feet from a blind
mouse. After groping uncertaily
.bout, the blind! innimaJ ,was tabie
to find the cheese, but it took con
siderahlie time. After he had (1on-
ducted the operation on its eyes,
however, it wa. able to reach the
cheese at one bound.
Read the Official Announcements
and anmpus News in The Daily.

OE LAUNDRY
2 1O AIN TREETI

?1O~NTE 2355i

MARBRUCK
TEA SHOP
632 FOREST AVENUE

WE SPECIALIZE IN
SHIRTS
COLLARS
AND OTHER
PERSONAL CLOTI
WE WILL CALL FOR AND DELIVER
Just Phone

IT PAYS TO COME DOWN TOWN
STUDENTS GET YOUR
H istoIogy-Bacteri ology
Laboratory Supplies
At Our
Special Low Prices
EBERBACH & SON CO.
200-204 East Liberty Street.

Luncheon

. . . 12-2

Afternoon Tea

2-5:30
.. 615

Dinner

. .

Sunday Dinner 12:30-1:30

I

PHONE 2641-R

A
r' 1
{1 T4
:

WOW
IA

OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENT
LECTURE PROGRAM

OF THE

ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION

WILLFIN'D
IWAY TO

1924-1925

SPEAKERS
The Oratorical Association is pleased to announce
that the following speakers and platform artists have been
secured for the annual program of 1924-1925.

Vilhjalmur Stefansson
Louis K. Anspacher
Carl Akeley
Kennedy-Matthison Co.
Edwin M. Whitney
.George Creel (Uncle Henry
Harry E. Fosdick
Tom Skeyhill-
Henry Van Dyke
Newton D. Baker.
William E. Borah Anr

Oct. 21
Oct. 30
Nov. 11
Nov. 18
Dec. 9
) Jan. 15
Jan. 23
Mar. 23
Dates
to be
nounced

low%,

GOOD CLOTHES

SALE OF TICKETS
The following plan for the sale of tickets has been
adopted
MAIL ORDERS
All applications received before Oct. 1, with remit-
tance at the rate of $3.50, will receive first choice of seats.
All applications received before Oct. 7, with remit-
tance of $3.00, will receive second choice of seats con-
sisting of those not taken in first choice.
All applications received before Oct. 13, with remit-
tance at the rate of $2.50, will receive third choice of
seats consisting of those; not taken in second choice.
Orders should be sent to TREASURER of the ORA-
TORICAL ASSOCIATION, Room 3211 Literary Building
i ,1 ,1. * 1 I ti 11 1

Because they rene-
d the new voou eof
f shi n with exc usive
etive origin
al~y ad dignity

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