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September 23, 1924 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 9-23-1924

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER

.iAL MEETINGS
IRD BY1 ALUMNI1
i A I
as Claneey, '101,, f Re'electedl
irector in Ileventh District,;
it Gathering in Marqeite
ALL CLUBS ACTIVE
district meetings were held
unini as well as several gala
ation gatherings by the alumni
in different cities during the
r months. The associated
an alumni clubs of the eleventh
ghth districts elected officers at
neetings.
nas Clancey, 'lL, was re-elect-
ector of the eleventh district
ree years. The following ofli-
ere also elected for the coming
President, A. H. Ryall, '02L;
esident, J. C. Condon, '96E;
cretary, H. L. Lawrence, '17.
gathering was held at Mar-
the latter part of August.
he eighth district, Arthur G.
'02, was named director; R.
1'95L, president; H. H. H3uebel,
vice president, and M. J. Rob-
'04L, secretary-treasurer. The
g was held in Los Angeles dur-
e early summer. Among the
rs were: Prof. Claude H. Van
>f the history dlepartment and
V. B. Pillsbury of the Psychol-
partment here..
ner celebrations were held by
ttle Creek, Port IIuTron, Three
and Detroit - clubs. These
vainly in the form of outings,
aseball, golf, and other games
ue.
lo, Columbus, and Saginaw
have been holding weekly
gs all summer.
thetic Pearls
re Latest Says
rondon Professor

He Is
Mr.

Just Plain
Pershing Now

REMOVES TO NHOME!
The new home of the Church of
Christ (Disciples), located at the
corner of l1ll street and Tappan
avenue, was formally opened to its
congregation Sunday, with a sermon
by the Rev. J. Allen Canby, acting
pastor.
The new church building is an ex-
act reproduction of ithe former
church which was situated on the
site of the new Lawyers' club. The+
University rebuilt the old churcl
when it was necessary o tear it
down to make room for the club,
using, so far as possible, the origi-
nal stone of which the church was
built.
A number of new features, includ-
ing an auditorium in the basement
and a number of rooms for the use
of the Sunday school, have beer
incorporated into the reconstructed"
church.
During the past year, while thc
Iew church was in the course of
construction, the congregation held,
its services in Lane hall. The
Church of Christ has held a promin-
ent place in the religious and edu-
cational life of Ann Arbor for more
than 30 years. Particular stress
has been laid by the church upon
student work. The church at largeI
was one of the first to see the need!
for intensive religious work inI
educational centers, and has been
responsible for the establishment of
a number of Bible chairs through-
out the country.+
WEEK NOV. 18 SET FOR
COMMUNITYFUND DRIVE
Plans for the annual community
fund campaign in Ann Arbor ;are
already underway ' for the drive
which is to start Nov. 16, and to
continue throughout that week. The
men in charge of the campaign will
be Dr. D. W. Meyers, chairman of
the committee, and Alfred Fisher,
publicity chairman. The general(
manager and director of the speak-I
ers' bureau have not been named
as yet.
It has also been decided by the
Cham)ber of Commerce that the.
names and amount given by each
contributor to the fund will be pub-
lished.4

Henry Douglas, 1oted At
Civic Leader, Dies In

s By traveling through the air he was Berlin, Sept. 22- The number
M +J'.q able to spray swamps and bogs unemployed in Germany. inclui
which could not have been reached occupied territories, now totals
Sum m er in any other way. 000,000 of whom 540,0OO are draw:
As a result of McDonnell's suc- doles. Business revival as result
cessful experiment, plans are being the Dawes plan is expected to
i Ann Arbor's coa formulated to have airplanes wipe crease the unemployed.
ustrial growth:, as out mosquitoes in other malaria
vement along lines regios. Subscribe for The Michigan Dail
aut_ Own h1101 f

Henry Woolsey Douglas, 89E, civic
leader and lifelong resident of Ann
Arbor, died here suddenly of heart
disease on August 24. Besides be-
ing active in civic life he was at the
time of his death chairman of the(
board of governors of the Michigan
Union and chairman of the building
committee of the Union, a member
of the board of directors of theI
Michigan Alumni association, man-
ager of the Westenaw Gas company, a
director of. the Hoover Steel Ball
company, and a member of the Ann
Arbor Chamber of Commerce.
Mr. Douglas was born January 7,
1867, in the old Douglas residence
on Huron street. In 1889 he graduat-'
ed from the Engineering college ofj
the University and immediately took!
over the management of the Ann
Arbor Gas company, taking the place
made vacant ly- the retirement of his
father. .In 1920.he became a member
of the Board of Governors of the
Michigan Union.
During the World War he was in
patriotic service,, as a rr.Wnbuer of
the county war board and chairman
of. the Red Cross. In recognition off
this service he was paid a high tribute
by the Idwin Prieskorn post of the
American Legion in the form of a
special citation which read:
" Citation for meritorious civic ser-
vice to the community of Ann Arbor,
Michigan. Henry Woolsey Douglas
has performed service making for the
realization of higher American Ideals
and betterment of our civic and com-
munity lives."
Many of the events of importance
CANADA SETS ASIDE FARm
FOR SCIENTIFIC STUDY~
The Pas, Manitoba, September 22.
-An area of approximately ten
acres of British Crown lands, situ-
ated along the Hudson Bay railway,
is to be placed under cultibation, as
a demonstration farm by the federal
department of agriculture, said the
Canadian minister of agriculture re-
cently.
The object of this marm will be
to demonstrate the growth and
mnturity of all garden vegetables,
grains and grasses in this latitude,
and to evolve, if possible, certain
species easily adaptable to a north-
ern climate.

in connection with
Sn.ercial and ind
well as its impro
of culture and be
their success to
Henry Woolsey D

it

'y,w uc 0
the activities of
ouglas.

r e g i o n s . ".
brY

MO UIUTO FALL PREY
TO AIRPLANE'S SPRAY
Mound, La., Sept. 22.-In the
happy days, before the coming of
airplanes, Mrs. Mosquito lived in the
middle of a quiet, secluded swamp
and raised her family of little skeets
unmolested.
Those days have gone forever.
Now a look of fear spreads itself
over Mrs. Mosquito's material coun-
tenance every time she hears the I
humming of a plane.
mThat is because scientists in the
Department of Agriculture have
conspired with fliers in the Army
Air Service to ruin Mrs. Mosquito's
once happy home life.
The first stroe of the conspiracy
was to attack the swampy region
particularly fondtof using as a hum-
toes-aristocrats of their kind-are
A plane piloted by Lieut. R. C
mer resort and breeding ground.
A plane piletd by Lieut. R. C.
McDonnell flew over the entire dust
district, spreading a poison dust
made of Paris Green and Tripoli
Earth through a specially construct-
ed spray-gun appratus attached to
the machine.
When McDonnell ended his flight
the mosquitos of the region were
gone.
The flyer piloted his ship high
enough above the trees to avoid
contact and circled themn to com-
pietely cover the surrounding marsh,

Fraternities and
Sororities

An enlarged plant enables us to
offer an improved service at re-

I

duced cost, combined with

a

quality of work which will please
the most exacting and satisfy the
most fastidious.
Ytiri-nijb etter imjressions"

U:

I

Over Moes Sport Shop

Phone 296-M

#, ,1

method of making mother of
'I by a chemical process, said to
he first time pearl has ever been
e artificially, was explained be..
the convention of the American
nical society, held recentl at cor-
University.
nis method of making mother of
1, which is chemically identical
pearls, was explained by Dr.
Donna, of the University of Lon-
octor Donna explained that all
Is up to the present time have
toward manufacturing imitation
Is, rather than manufacturing gen-
synthetic ones. Ordinary syn-
c ones, he said, are simply glass
s which are covered with a lac-
or varnish containing an irid-
nt substance obtained from the
s of herring and other fish. These,
howed, are in no sense pearls.
e method used by Professor Don-
was to evaporate a solution of
ui bicarbonate in gelatine, withj
result that a thin film of irrides-
material, showing all the charac-,
tics of mother of pearl, was de-
ed on the evaporating dish.
ter, he believes, the process may
o perfected that artificial pearls,
tinguishable from the natural
ty, may be placed on the market.
has already been done in the
of diamonds, sapphires, rubies,
other precious and semi-precious
s.
wed On Honor
Students Pay Up
servance of the honor spirit is a
ss, according to the management
e Union at the University of Cal-
a. There the students are kept'
r no check in the cafeteria or.
fountains, being placed upon
honor completely.
hough there are 1,800 checks is-
daily through the soda fountain
00 each noon in the cafeteria, no
aces have been found where 'a
ant intentionally avoided paying
ill. No one is detailed to make
that the patrons settle for their

HENRY KRAEME5 FORMER
PHR AY DADIES
Prof Henry Kraemer, director of
the Kraemer . Scientific laboratory,
and dean of the pharmacy school of
the University from 1918 to 1920, died
at his home in Mount Clemens dur-
the summer recess.
Professor Kraemner came to the
University from the Philadelphia Col-
lege of Pharmacy, wlhere he was di-
rector of the laboratories and profes-
sor in the botany and pharmacognosy
departments. During his professor-
ship at the Philadelphia college he
was also editor of the American Jour-
nal of Pharmacy. Ile resigned his
position at the University to become
director of the Kraemer Scientific
laboratory.
OHIO.STATI UNIVERSITY
RUSHESNEW BUILDING
Colinmbu4s, Ohio, Septembcr 22-
Ohio -, te university is completing
2 builing program which will make
av~,1e bythe end of this month
four ow buildngs. They arc
Hmuilton hall, Commerce building,
, ,: a tion building, ai th(
Tnurnaltisc building. The entire
group represents an expenditure of
OV'r on1 million dollars..
Offices of the president of the
university, of the registrar, the
purchasing agent, entrance board,
alumni secr)ary and news bur'eau
will be housed in the new Adminis-
trationl building. These were form-
erly located in University hall, am
,heir removal has given opportunity
for a remodeling of the rooms.
They -will be used as class rooms
and offices.
IRead the Official Announcements
and CImpius News In The Daily.

PRINCETON

CHARLEVOIX

ANN ARBOR

CARTIERS

11

H AFOUNTAIN PENS~

have opened display rooms in Ann Arbor

Why not use the buying power of three stores and several branches to
your advantage? Imported Clothes that are Hand Tailored, Foreign Haber-
dashery and a line of Fine Domestic Woolens at lowest prices!

of the better nationally known
makes.

I

Come up and be convinced!

CONKLIN

WATERMAN

SHEAFFER
PARKER
LE BOEUF

H. A. Cartier, Mgr.,
W. C. Cartier, '25

306 S. Staee St.-2nd Floor
Over Haller's Jewelry

I

III

Pricd $2.50 up.

B-9
Women's Black
Endura

Your name engraved free
on all purchases.

0. D. MORRILL
17 NICKELS' ARCADE
The Stationery and Typewriter Store.
If you write, we have it.

UNIVERSITY,
SC-HOOL OF MUSICI
Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Fall Semester Begins $ept. 23

1.

'

MAX TIN HALLER
112 EAST LIBERTY STREET

OW
SHOWING

ARR
Popular Mat. Wed
ICHVARtD Jl;K:RNI

The
The Show with 1,00(

1Nights - to $2.50
Sat. mat. 50C to $1.50
d. 5N. to $1
OIN Presents (
ICOMED)Y
o and 2 laughs!
.... 3 Laugis
.... 116 "
s1 " 1
M L

Forty-two years' experi-
ence in furnishing student
rooms enables us to serve
you with most durable and

practical,
priced

yet moderate

+ - .. t
{
.
t
f {

EARL Ve MOORE, Musical Director
THEODORE HARRISON, Head of Voice Department
GUY MAIER, Head of Pianoforte Department
SAMUEL P. LOGKW#OD, Head of Violin Department
PALMER GHRISTIAN, Head of Organ Department
WILFRED WILSON, Head of Wind Instrument Department
JOSEPH E. ADDY, Head of Methods Department
BYRL FOX ACHER, Dean of Women
and the following artist teachers:

STUDENT ROOM
Double Deck
Beds

Folding Beds

FURNITURE
Study Tables
(Single or double)
Oak Desks
(Single or double)
Swivel Chairs
Comfortable
Rockers a.
I eaher

i

II

scell8
6G
LG
i
Gi
Gi

y -Ilining hl oom «
i3- 1ed]i111's Parlor
Li-Poier's lomue
6- Plullman Sleeper
17W 1t ~n11

Cotton Mattresses

Ava Comin Case (Piano), Marian Struble Freeman (Violin), Andrew Haigh
(Piano and Theory), Nora Crane Hunt (Voice), Maude C. Kleyn (Voice), Grace John-
son-Konold (Voice), Edith Koon (Piano), Ora Larthard (Cello), Clara Lundell (Piano),
Martha D. Merkle (Piano), Maude Okkelberg (Piano), Mabel Ross Rhead (Piano),
Grace Richards (Piano). Helen Snyder (English). Otto . Stahl (Piano and Theory),

r ....

74

ii
ii

.14 " I

if

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