100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 23, 1924 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 9-23-1924

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

22,. 1924

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

23. 1924 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUMMER SESSION
5HOWS 293 GAINI
Five Schools Increase Enrollment;
Lits and Engineers Have
Decrease

Will He Abolish
War In World-

Guy Maier, Theodore Harrison
To Teach In School Of Music'

Guy Maier,
Lee Pattison
have won hi

whose concerts with will also be a short formal lecture
in two piano recitals, with analytical and interpretive
mrecognition all over remar s. .His class in pianofbrteI
technic will give special attention

TOTAL TOPS 3,000

Increased popularity of the Sum-
mer session this year was shown by
an increase of 293 students over last
year's enrollment, the total being
more than 3,000. The Medical
school, Graduate school, School of
Education, Pharmacy and Coaching
schools showed an increase, while the
Literary and Enginering sch'ools
showed a adecrease in registration.
In comparison with the year pre-
vious the following variations in en-
rollment are found: Medical school,
increase of 53 students, maing the
total registration 290; Graduate
school, increase of 53 sudents, mak-
ing the total 659; School of Educa-
tion, increase of 101, total 409; Col-.
legges of Engineering and Architect-
ure, de4crease of 24, total 413; School
of Pharmacy, decrease of six, total
13; and the Coaching school showed
an increase of one, making its total

;he country as a pianist of the finest
rank, will arrive in Ann Arbor soon
to begin his teaching with the SchoolI
,f Music on September 30. Mr.
faier will fill the vacancy caused,
,y the 'absence oft Albert Lockwood
who has been granted leave of ab-
-ence for the year.
l ie will conduct two class courses,
the first in intertepretation and the
second in technic. The class in in-
[erpretation will meetnfromw3 to 5
o'clock on Tuesday, and will, take
up the problems of acquiring a
technic of interpretation, and therei

i

to the principles .of controlled
weight, rotation, key resistance and
the application of these principles in
the development of securing depend.
able technic. The first meeting of
this class is scheduled for 4 o'clock
on Friday, October 3. I is necessary
for Mr. Maier to be away from Ann
Arbor at times to carry on his co--
cert engagements with Mr. Pattison,
during ,these intervals, his wife Mrs.
Maier, herself a pianist of recogniz-
ed worth, will take the classes.
Theodore Harrison, who for years

herd the headship of the vocal de-
partment of the University School
of Music before his withdrawal to
Chicago where he has been engaged
in teaching and concert singing, will
return this fall to head the vocal
department again. He will conduct
two classes, one in repertoire and
interpretation, and one in public
school methods. In the first, the
literature for the voice from the ear
Ily Italian school, on through the
modern Italian, German, and French
Classics, together with arias from
operas and oratorios will be studied.
The pupil of Lombardi and Carrobi
Iwith whom he studied in Itahy,
where he also sang three years in
opera, Mr. Harrison is considered!
one of the finest teachers of voice
in the country.
Another class conducted by jMr
Harrison is designed largely for the
benefit of the students in public

,

school methods. In this department!
he will be assisted by Joseph E.
Maddy who is to take over the work
of public school music, the depart-
ment formerly conducted by George
Oscar Bowen before his removal to
Tulsa, Oklahoma. Mr. Maddy will
give, in addition to the regular in-
struction, a course relating to all

points in orchestra tech
ting, intonation, balan
tion of instruments, an
tion as applied to schoc
He will also offer cou
'playing of violin, viol
dther stringed instru
prinsiples of 'each inst
be presented and studio

(A

l >

I

Registration thisyear vas delayed
due to the fact that schools in De-
troit and the vicinity had not closed
when Summer session opened.
Turtle Races4
Stir Oklahoma
Oklahoma City, Okla., Sept 22-
Since its introduction some months
ago, turtle racing has become all
the rage among exclusive Oklahoma
gentlemen' circles. The price of
good agile terrapins is said to have
risen alarmingly during the past
few weeks, and certain of the more
ardent sportsmen are even import-;
ing fresh racing blood from Florida,
North Carolina, and other tarapin
lands.
County fares, department store
picnics and all sorts of outdoor en-
tertainments are adding a turtle
contest to their programs. A short
course has been found necessary, in
order to compensatebfor thenotori-
ously leisurely habits of the con-
testants.
WISCONSIN LAW FORBIDS
DIMMING OF HEADIGHTS"
Milwaukee, Wis., 'S s 22 (by Asso-
diated Press).'ontraryto general
regulations,- throughout the country,
the state of Wisconsin forbids motor-
ists from dimming their headlights.
The reason given is that dimming
causes more accidents than glaring
headlights.
"Everyone knows that bright lightss
shining in the eye blind a person and
cause accidents," reads a bulletin
fromsthe State Highway Department.
"Not so many people know that sud-
denly dimming the headlights on pass-
ing another car also blinds the driver
and that this procedure caused just
as many highway accidents as glar-
ing lights."
The process is compared with step-
ping from a bright room into a pitch-
dark room.
"If memory of what we saw just
before dimming were not a helpful
factor to the driver," the bulletin goes
on, "the number of night accidents
due to dimming would be appalling."
GREETINGS

Will this man bring peace to the,
Jworld? A draft of a protocol out-
lawing war and forcing arbitration
of all interiartional disputes., pre-
pared by Edouard Benes, foreign
minister of Czecho-Slovakia, has
been given preliminary approval by
a sub-commission of the League of
Nations, sitting at Geneva.
RUSSIANGRANDUOKE,
London, Sept. 22.-Grand Duke Cy-
'ril, cousin of the former Czar of Rus-
sia, has signed a proclamation declar-
ing himself "emperor of all the Rus-
sias,' says a Berlin dispatch to the
Daily Mail.
The proclamation, it was said, will
be published Sunday in a Russian
newspaper at Belgrade. It will re-
quire that Grand Duke Cyril is to de-
vote himself to liberating Russia from
the communist yoke and that, while
sworn to" observe the orthodox faith,
he will allow complete religious lib-
erty.
Grand Duke Cyril's son, Vladimir,
7 years old, is to be proclaimed heir
to the throne.

I
DISIX OF
MOND'Sa fK,0LLEGIANS

With PHIL DIAMOND

Nature and Science offers to all the
opportunity to grow flowers
But Experience and Conscientious
Practice is necessary for the artistic at
rangement which the real flower-lovers
demand.

Two All-Star Orchestras Now

Engagements, Season 1924-25

GOOD HEW
FLO E L 00 . o

601 E. William St.

Phone 24"-M
32 6-

{

Grand Duke Cyril, oldest son of
Grand Duke Vladimir, uncle of the late.
Czar Nicholas, for a period was con-
sidered in disgrace by Nicholas be-
cause he married, in direct disobedi-
ence to the ruler's command, Victoria I
Melita, divorcedsgrand duchess of
Hesse. His banishment from the roy-
al court lasted from~i the time of the
marriage in the fall of 1905 to Novem-
-r, 1908, the ia thi death ofhis
uncle, Grand Duke Alexis, the Czar
pardoned him.
Cyril played a prominent part in
the Russo-Japanese 'war. He went to
the front at the very start of the con-
filct and was -appointed by the late
Admiral Makeroff to be first officer of
Sthe battleship Petropavlovsk. Ile was
aboard that ship when she was blown
up at the entrance of Port Arthur,
April 13, 1904, but received slight in-
.juries and was rescued by two sail-
ors.
The grand duke was born in 1878.
He visited the United States in 1899.
[lAVE YOU SUBSCRIBED YET

TO THE STUDENTS
OF MICHIGAN
You have been looking around town for the right kind
of place in which to eat your meals. You have been favorably
impressed in some places, and less favorably impressed in
others. To some restaurants you never wish to return. If
you have not already given the ANN ARBOR RESTAUR-
ANT a trial we earnestly extend to you an invitation. We
feel sure that you will be only too glad to return for all of
your meals. You will find that all of our food is wholesomely
prepared and that it is of .the best quality. The restaurant
itself is modernly equipped. It is always kept in the best of
condition. In connection with the restaurant is a fine soda
fountain where may be had soft drinks and ice cream. Again
we say-Come down and try the ANN ARBOR REST-
AURANT, where our motto "QUALITY, SERVICE,
and REFINEMENT" always rules.
THE ANN ARBOR RESTAURANT
215 SOUTH MAIN STREET

3-7

Years

Beyond

Experiment

CHOOSE YOUR CLEANER
AS CAREFULLY AS YOU
CHOOSE YOUR CLOTHES

1';hi.r'.w pn nwT ~ ~ r rrr r ~ rnur r wwfl

i

CLOSI

G

OUT

11

/ N

Michigan students
have carried the
name and fame of

BETSY ROSS

SHOP

GOING OUT OF BUSINESS!
Store must be turned over Oct. 15, 1924
White Shirts, Tan Shirts, Gray Shirts, collars attached and
neckband. All sizes at $1.45, $1.75, $1.90, Etc.
$1.25 WoolSox (Imported) . . . . . . . . . . . . 75c
Thousands of Dollars Worth of High Class Men's Furnishings and Woolens Ito be
sold before store is turned over to new occupant.

to every state in
the Union. Betsy
Ross is famous for
its

I

FINE CANDIES

and

Delicicus Sundaes
Meet your friends
here and make this

FROSH

$2 LAUNDRY $ 70
Cases

TELEPHONE 13; UNLUCKY

FOR SPOTS.

A $5.00 CASH

I'

-14, 1 1 A C '11. - _.. _1..TQT_ -1 Q --- on- D N1 n '- 41.1 11; -,XY71,,+. r "I I7Y'C 11;81

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan