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September 30, 1923 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-09-30

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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1923 4

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE Pyrvu

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE FIVU

4'

BOOTH FELLOWSHIP
Annuity of $1200 From Scholarship
Fund Will Send Architects
Abroad

have its quota of Michigan graduates
Alumnae in all parts of the country
are taking very active part in the civ-
ic life of the University of Michigan.
General Selected
To Direct Relief

FIRST-HAND KNOWLEDGE OF
OLDER CIVILIZATION IS A
Details of the George G. Boot
Travelling Fellowship in Architectur
were made known yesterday whe
President Marion L. Burton receive
from Mr. Booth his suggestions fo:
the administration of the $20,000 fun
which he has donated. As a result o
several conferences with Prof. Emi
Lorch of the college of architecture
Mr. Booth suggests the following pro-
gram:
"The purpose of the fellowship is
to encourage advanced study and hell
provide a broader preparation for ar-
chitectural practice. The candidate
will be expected to go abroad be-
cause of the advantages, cultural and
otherwise, to be gained by a change
of environment and a first-hand
knowledge of older civilizations. At
the outset the fellowship is to be
awarded annually but it may later be
assigned bi-annually should standards
of scholarship or conditions affecting
the income or cost of travel and living
make it desirable.
Age Limit Set
"Students will be eligible who are
not more than thirty years of age on
the day set for beginning the compe-
tition in design. They shall either be
graduates of the college of architec-
ture of the University of Michigan or
shall have been in residence for and
have substantially completed the last
two years of the four-year course."
The candidates for the fellowship
will be passed upon by a jury of nine
architects, some of them non-resident
and others members of the faculty.
Indreaching its decision, the jury will
consider the following (1) the general
record and standing of the candidate;
(2)- the candidate's written statement
of not more than 500 words bearing on
his design; (3) student communica-
tions bearing on the design; (4) the
competition drawing.
"The award having been made",
Mr. Booth writes, "I believe that con-
siderable latitude should be allowed
to the winner of the fellowship as to
the manner in which he should use
the funds; anticipating that he would
seriously listen to such recommenda-
tions as the department chiefs might
deem it proper to make.
Suggests More Freedom
Thave in inind that in some cases
fellowships which provide for travel
abroad have been so limited that men
have been forced to spend their time
in a manner not very helpful to the
plans they have made to follow up
their chosen profession; one student
might wish to concentrate his entire
energies and the use of the entire
sum available in the study of archi-
tecture at Athens or Rome, or ifhist
Schief aim was residential work, it
might be most profitable to spend all
of his time in England, while others
again might profit by a more general
travelling program.
Mr. Booth's gift to the University is
in the form of fifteen-year bonds of
the Bedell Company of Michigan bear-
% ing six percent interest. The amount
available annually for the winner of
the fellowship is therefore $1,200.
SWAIGN OUTLOOK FOR
YEAR LOOKS FAVORBE
ORGANIZED ALUMNAE GROUPS TO
COOPERATE WITH
LEAGUE
With the assumption of office of the
alumnae director of the University of
Michigan league campaign, Miss Car-
oline Olney, the out-look for this
' irnar'a in niv tn ino n m n

1I

Brig. Gen. Frank I, McCoy
At the request of the American
Red Cross, Secretary Weeks has as-
signed Brig. Gen. Frank R. McCoy
as director of American relief work
in Japan. McCoy now is in Japan on
leave of absence.
CITIES OF MICHIGAN
RESUMEFORMER TIME
Detroit, Sept. 29.--(By A.P.)-One
Michigan city, Muskegon, turns back
its clocks today and five others will
do their hour dropping at midnight
tomorrow, after a summer of daylight
saving time. A week from tomorrow
Battle 'Creek will slip back into Cen-
tral stndard time, while Lansing will
wait until Oct. 15 before tinkering
with its timepieces.
The cities where time changes be-
come effective tomorrow midnight are:
Owosso, Grand Rapids, Kalamazoo,
Jackson, and Ludington. Adrian has
not yet decided when the change will
be made.
Ten Michigan cities will be unaffect-
ed by the time change. Eight of them,
Detroit,. Flint, Bay City, Pontiac, Ann
Arbor, Saginaw, Port Huron, and Mon-
roe, operate on Eastern time the year
round, and the other two, Benton Har-
bor and Hillsdale, operate on Cen-
tral standard time and did not, adopt
daylight savings.
Manila, Sept. 29.-Democratic lead-
ers have asked the Supreme Court of
the Philippines to order Gen. Wood to
reveal details of expenditures from
the 1,000,004-peso Independence Fund.

SCHOOL OF MUSIC PLANS
FOR FAULTY CONCERTS
OCTOSER 28 IS DATE SET FOR
FIRST PROGRAM OF
SERIES
Faculty Concerts, to be given by
the School of Music faculty, the Uni-
versity Symphony orchestra, and oc-
casional visiting soloist-,, are being
carefully planned this, year, according
to the statement of Samuel P. Lock-
wood of the School of Music. Cham-
ber music will be featured particu-
larly in spite of the lack of proper
facilities for its effective production.
The programs will be systematically
planned and their aim will be to cen-
ter public interest in the music pre-
sented rather than in the performers
The University Symphony orchestra
has not yet been reorganized for this
year, but the director is planning to1
offer at least four concerts by that or-
ganization.
The first concert will be offered on I
Oct. 28, at which time will appear two
new members of the School of Music
faculty, Mis's Ora Larthard,
'cellist, and James Hamilton), tenor.
Miss Larthard is a graduate of the
New England conservatory, and has
had experience in ensemble work. Mr.
Hamilton is returning to Ann Arbor
musical circles after a successful ca-
reer on the concert stage.
Other concerts of this series will be
offered at intervals of about threer
weeks.
Tygers Defeat
Cleveland, 3-0
Detroit, Sept. 29.-Ty Cobb's pack
of Tigers advanced one more step to-
ward its prey, second honors in the
American league race, by defeating
Cleveland here today in a close game,
the score being 3-0. This brings the
Detroit team within one-tenth of a
per cent of the Indians, present and
past retainers of second place.
Uhle pitched for Cleveland. Earl
Whitehill replaced Dauss in the first
inning after the veteran pitcher walk-
ed the first than at bat. This recruit
left-hander from Birmingham pitched
the remainder of the- game for De-
troit.
Manila, Sept. 29.-Both sides fore-
cast possible bloodshed Oct. 2 (Mon-
day), in the polling for the Philippine
senatorial election.
THE BUSY BEE
PASSES
WATCH FOR OPENING
H A OF O- T
THE ARBOR FOUNTAIN

Labor On Airship Wil Compile 123 EStatsties I
Letters are being mailed by John
Halted By Strike W. Ross, alumni secretary of the '23
class of engineering, to secure inform-
Freidrichshafen, Sept. 29.-(By A. ation regarding members of the class,
P.)-Unrest among the workmen and Over 600 letters will be sent out, somej
unsettled political conditions along of which will travel to all parts of the
Lake Constance may delay the trip to world.
the United States of the great Zeppe- Each graduate is asked to fill out a
lin airship ZR-3, which is being built card giving his correct address, his
here for the United States Navy. Dr. present occupation and any news of
lHngo Eckener, director of the Zeppe- interest to the class.j
lin company, said. At the same time
Dr. Eckener announced the postpone-
ment of an inspection of the ship ar-
ranged for the newspaper correspond-
ents for Monday. He said it was not
possible now to say when the ZR-3
would be ready even for trial flights
in Germany. 7%

First Semester WATCH FOR OPENING
)IONDAY, OCTOBERt FIRST -OF-
Shortliand, Typewriting, ---OFA--
Secretarial Training THE' ARBOR FOUNTAIN
HAMILTON ISINESS
COLLEGE
State and Williams Streets Read the Want Ads

Daily classified for real results.
Patronize The Daily advertisers.
I~

it

:_._

300 MICIUAN STUDENTS
ABROAD0 DURING SUMMER
More than 300 Michigan students
were abroad during summer vacation,
according to the estimation of local
authorities, besides about 40 members
of the faculty. One student traveler
remarked that he saw Michigan Union
pins gleaming in every large European
capital. It is thought that the large
amount of foreign travel this year is
due to the low rate of exchange in
most countries.
The male students used all possible
means of crossing the water, some go-
ing as part of the crew on freight and
cattle boats, and several secured jobs
as bell-hops on the Leviathan. An en-
gineering student, who worked his way
over and back, is said to have spent
a month and a half abroad, traveling
through France, Belgium and Germany
for only $150.
An interesting experience was had
by one junior lit who was arrested as
he stepped off the ship in Hamburg. Ile
could not understand the German Ian-
guage and so he remained in a cell
for two hours before he-could convince
the police that he was not the English
conidence man they were seeking.
One of last year's freshmen found
it profitable to remain in Europe and
so instead of returning this term, he
remained in the Ruhr district to write
newspaper articles. Another former
Daily reporter is studying art at Mun-
ich, Germany, in company with 20
other Americans. He states. that at
present prices they will be able to live
a year and attend school for $100.
The student publications were well
represented with the following men
across: E. C. McCobb, '23, former ed-
itor of Chimes; E. R. Meiss, '23, last
year's head of the editorial board of
The Daily; C. M. Kindel, '23E, assist-
ant manager of the Technic last year;
Joe B. Vlack, '23E, and S. B. Sloss,
'24, both assistant editors of the Mich-
iga nensian.
Taranto, Sept. 29.-Three transports
have reached here with Italian troops
from Corfu.
First Semester
MONDAY, OCTOBER FIRST
Shorthand, Typewriting,
Secretarial Training
HAMILTON BUSINESS
COLLEGE
State and Williams Streets

!/di .,,Iijj///l,

THE BUSY BEE

Beauty in
Rubber Fountain Pens

I
:.a

THE new Wahl Pen in engine-turned
black rubber is unlike any fountain pen
you have ever seen. Anyone who writcs will
be proud to own a pen of such grace and
splendid writing performance. It is as prac-
tical as it is beautiful.
The man's-size fist with the cast-iron grip
will find a Wahl Pen to fit it. And so will
the dainty feminine hand. There are sizes
and shapes to suit every man and woman in
college or business.
Wahl Pen is made by the makers of Ever-
sharp. It is another leader. The Wahl fill-
ing device fills the pen brim-full of ink every

time. The Wahl comb feed regulates the
flow so that the pen writes the instant you
touch it to paper. You never have to shake it.
The ink never floods.
The everlasting nib is 14-karat gold, tipped
with the hardest, finest iridium. Unbiased
experts say it is the ultimate in nib-making.
Clipped in pocket, purse or note book,
Wahl Pen cannot leak-the patented cap
construction prevents it. Wall Pen is so
perfectly balanced and proportioned that it
seems made just for your hand alone. It
writes perfectly. Ask your dealer about
Wahl Pen. All styles and sizes. $2.50 up,

i.

..:
..

j

Made in the U. S. A. by THE WAHL CO., Chicago

A FEW
Duck Laundry Boxes
$1.i75
REGULAR $2.25 CASE
AND WHILE YOU ARE HERE LOOK OVER OUR
COMPLETE LINE OF TRUNKS, BAGS, POCKET-
BOOKS AND LEATHER NOVELTIES
"EVERYTHING IN LEATHER GOODS"
F. W. WILKINSON
325 SOUTH MAIN

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E'EN

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yar- ntensive campaign seemn-
usually favorable. Up to this time
esponse to the call for funds has
been most gratifying and it is hoped
by those in charge of the work that
by means of the united efforts of both
students and alumnae even more suc-
cess will be achieved in the project
this year.
Correspondence has been establish-
ed with prominent alumnae of over
60 cities in the United States and in
many cases the alumnae have organ-
ized into definite working units, which:
hold regular meetings in order to co-
operate more effectively with the
University. More than 20 of the
groups are established in Michigan
and have recently carried on many
varied activities for the benefit of the
League fund.
Mrs. Herbert J. Goulding, treasurer
of the Central Campaign committee
reported total pledges and assets
amounting to $102,980.87 at a meet-
ing of the committee held on June 1.1
The campaign is being conducted with
the closest regard to minimizing all
expenses.
The last analysis of the University
made by the Central Campaign corn
mittee shows that the influence of
Michigan has spread to practically ev-

Ii

SCHUMACHER HARDWARE COMPANY
A STORE OF INDIVIDUAL SHOPS
308-10-12 SO. MAIN ST. PHONES 174-175M
THE SMOK AD

THE MAN'S SHOP
TOP COATS
for fall
Correct in outline and pattern
$45 to $62
Sack Suits in two and three button
styles - blunt vest - full trousers
$48 to $62
A complete line of Bannister Shoes
$13.50
GREENWOOD AND KILGORE
STATE STREET OVER CALKINS

i

A SUPERIOR SMOKING SET
For Home and Office Use-For Motoring
The Smoke-A-Dor provides a handsome, compact, convenient and com-
plete auxiliary, equally well adapted to the home, the office, or the
motor car. It is divided into three compartments. One carries
cigarettes, another matches, and the third is a tightly-closed ash
compartment. The cigarettes are automatically lifted into easy reach
by the raising of the compartment lid, the matches likewise. Come in
and look over
THE SMOKE-A-DOR
For Home-Office-or Motoring

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