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September 30, 1923 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1923-09-30

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

S-UNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1923

4

i I club or society and forgets the 1
greater end for which he is striving.
He limits his friendships to his own
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER 0 TIE respective group and does not mix
INIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN with the great mass of Michigan stu-
dents. He then places his own group
Published every morning except Monday first and Michigan second. His eyes
during the University-year by the Poard in
Control of Student Publications. are blinded by a handful of associ-
_______________________-ates. Last Thursday President H. P.
Members of Western Conference Editorial
Association. Faunce, of Brown university, delivered
the opening address of the school

T I LL
I
f IJ I f
ITURRAII FOR
JACK WALTO

he Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lishled, therein.
sEntred at the pt.toffee at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter.
Subcription by carrier, $3.5o; by mail,
$,4.00o.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Sireet.
lPhoacs Fditorial, 2414 and 176-M; Busi-
ness, 960.
Signed communications, not exceeding 300
w~ -.willlhe putished in The lDaily at
the discretion o nthe Editos. Upon request,
the identity of . communicants will be re-
garded as confidential.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephones, 2414 and 176-1Ii
MANAGING EDITOR
HOWARD A. DONAHUE
News Editor...............Julian E. Mack
City Editor...................I larry Hoey
Editorial Board Chairman.. ..R. C. Moriarty
Night Editors
V TT -A,1- .. R ("nn lr

year to the faculty and student body
of Brown. He began by saying:
Cliques can 'have no place in
genuinedemocracy. College men
should show the world that allI
their smaller loyalties are swal-
lowed up into one great loyalty
to the college itself. Unity, work,
loyalty-these are the three indis-
pensable elements of college life.I
Write these words into the by-laws
of every organiation here at Michi-
gan claiming to have the good of the
University at heart. Read them at
every meeting and let them be meni-
orized by every man, for they embody
the exact need of our campus today.{
What we want is unity and loyalty
for the whole of Michigan.
- ENTERTAINMENT
A fear of culture often prevents

Progress of the Building Programn
Yesterday we made a personal in-
spection of that part of the building
program listed as One Literary Build-
ing. Although . it is already near
enough completion to give some hint
of its coming architectural beauty, it
still lacks the homelike quality which
we should like to see in our Literary
Building. The floors, for example,
instead of being covered with ankle-
deep Axminister, are paved with a
double layer of loose brick. The
walls, which, according to all the
architectural tradition in re literary
buildings, should be draped with the
masterpieces of Rembrandts and Cor-
ots, are at present finished in a rough
concretish material-anything but tas-
ty. The present sta.rs won't do at
all. The whole thing is very dirty.
We aren't much of a critic of liter-
ary buildings; but we should say that
what it needs is a woman's touch.
* * *
Those of our readers who don't be-
lieve the Daily is a swell paper
should get hold of a copy of "The New
Genetation", "The Leading West Side
Newspaper" of Chicago, published by
R. V. L'bonati, one of last year's cam-
pus Boosters. This is in every res-
pect a hustling little paper, but it
has a long way to go to catch up.
The August number arrived .in this
office yesterday afternoon. It con-
tained a full account of President
Harding's funeral, and a book col-
umn with a review of Oliver Twist as
the main feature. Huzzah for Libon-
ati!
* * *
Tribute
There is just
One thing that
Makes Mr. Wenley
A greater man than
Us-and that's
The Yray he says
"Ladies and Gentlemen".

EDITORIAL COMMENT
A STAMPEDE WOULH BE BAD
(The Detroit News)
This nation is in some d(angor of
being stampeded by hysteria out of
prohibition, just as many think it was
stampeded into it.
Political centers in the East, Repub-
lican as well as Democratic, are as-
suming a decidedly humid atmosphere.
Observers point to the attitude of Sen-
ators Pepper and Reed of Pennsyi-
vania, and the anti-prohibition plank
just espoused by Senator Edge of New
Jersey, one of the few important Re-
publican office-holdiers in the state
as "wet as the Atlantic Ocean."
These activities in themselves do
not mean so much. In their relation
to public feeling they mean a great
deal. Senators Pepper, Edge and
Reed, trying to read the writing on
the wall before the pen has left it,
think they see an anti-prohibition
wave coming; they want to be on its
crest instead of wallowing in its
trough or submerged in the un<er-
tow.
These senators may be feeling te
political pulse aright. The wave they
see coming may be no phantom. But
they will be true to neither party nor
duty if they fail to demand a fair
trial for prohibition. Attempt a sin-
cere and powerful enforcement of the
Volstead law; then, if it does not
work, ride the wave. Thelo epublican
party, to which these men l'long, can
do little but endorse, the first part of
this rule, and common sense public
opinion will stand by it. The second
part may be the way out if the ii"','
fails.

ATH
130.1H ENI)S OFiTH' DIAGONAL WALK

E

1~-~~~-- ~-'~~-~- _____________ -

THE BUSY BEE
PASSES
WilATCH FOR OPENING
THE A RBOr F IUb TtA!N
ARRIAN-ANN ARBOR BUSlNE
Centrlal Time (SIoW Timie)
Leave Chamber of Conmerce
Week Days Sundays
6:45 a. in. 6:.15 a.m.
S 2:4.5 p. M. 6:45 P. m.
4:s- pm.
JAS.p 4.ELLIOTT, Proprietor
Pto-e 926-3k, Adrian, Mikh.

IChinese i rbroideries:-
Lin z-s, Ba s, Satin Pillow Tops,
Mandarin Coats, Carved Ivory,
" he i1o10t beautifulgamsin the world'--MAHH-JONG
Womian's Exc!hang. - - - to Nickels A~rcade

i ._ .._: _ _--- a ..._.
s
=t{

_____ -

BOOTH 'S ORCHESTRA
V hone tii

a
3
3
J
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13ies g ix..kC -J s ..'fl ie
Ry. A. llin gton T. . Fiske those who are capable of deriving the
harry C. Clark T. .(, Garlinghouse maximum amount of pleasure from el--
Sports Editor..............Ralph N. Byers evating entertainment from taking ad-
Women's Editor...........Winona Hibbard
Telegraph Editor...............R. B. Tarr vantage of their opportunity. Pre-
Sunday Magazine Editor......F. L. Tildenm
Music Editor...............Ruth A. Howell meditating on the possible accusations
Editorial Board of highbrow snobbery or assumed in-
Paul Einstein Rolhrrt Ranmay tellectualism, young ? nen with the
Andrew Propper most extensively perfected aesthetic
Assistants sense avoid the worthwhile pleasures
e G. Fiactke J. M Gin sid that they may appear more at one
Bernadette Cate E. C. Mack with their fellow students.
1 arold Ehrlich S. J. Schnitz
E. C. Fingerle W. L. Scratch Modern educational methods have
T. P. Henry S. L. Snemth been accused of directing the minds
r K. C. Kellar I. .Ston- of all students to a common center,
Joseph Kruger N. R. ThaiI
Elizabeth lielerman S. B. Tremble of destroying individuality in the at-
R. R. McGeorge, Jr. W. J. Walthour tempt to create a strong group senti-
ment. This is true at Michigan only
BJSINESS STAFF insofar as the institution fails to ac-
Telephone 960 complish its purpose. Everything
present in university life here would
BUSINESS MANAGER stimulate personal investigation, in--
L REC H. FAYROT!cite the imagination, and heighten
Advertising.. . E, L. Duntne the ambition if the student body
1dveytising..............Perry M. Hayden would appreciate the fact.
Advertising. .....................C. Purdy
Advertising....................W. Roesser I The several concert series, oratori-
,Advertising...... ....W. K. Scherer
Accounts...... .. ... W. Christie cal association lectures, and dramati t
Circulation............ Jno. Haskins productions of both professional and
Publication...Lawrence Pierce
amateur companies, all of which are
Assistants offered before local audiences, sum up
Pennic Caplan Edw' . I)Hoedemaker
lohn Conlin Harold A. Marksa to a total of approximately one hund-
Allin B. Crouch Myron Parker
Louis AM. Dexter S. A. Robinson red distinct offerings of high cultural
Rowan Fasquell II. M. Rockwell value. These functions not only stini-
{R seph J. Tina II. E. Rose
avtidA. Fox Will Weise ulate thought and ambition, but serve
Lauren Haight C. V. White as entertainment of the most enjoy-
able sort. It bears little credit. on
the college man to have to confess
that he can not find pleasure in ser-1
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1923 ious things.
Night Editor-THOMAS E. FISKE Whether studies should interfere
with attendance at such affairs is a
IHELPINO FRESHMEN question only the individual can de-
In accordance with the custom of cide. Both are important and it
should be his ambition to include both
past years more than two hundred in his daily schedule.
upperclassmen have been appointedI
by the Upperclass' Advisory commit- Dr. McKenzie, noted scientist of
tee to serve in the capacity of advis- Pennsylvania, says athletics will mar
sfor thei g Freshmen. The 'a woman's beauty. But in some cases,
o judging by the newspaper pictures,
duty of an advisor is to aid the stu-
dents under his charge in every way we do not see how this could be pos-
possible. If the freshman has dif-
ficulty with his schedule, his land- A Cleveland paper is running a con-
lady, his studies, etc., he should seek
the counsel of his advisor a man who test for the city's handsomest mail
the counsetofhi avisor;gamnughtocarrier. To those who get most of
have been through the mill and knot their mail around the first of the
hmonth, no mail-carrier looks hand-
the ropes completely. The existence some.

iiE:iHT ITF YOU W%;H TO'
- SUCC(EED.
liEt OOD O )i)YOIRFEET,
- 14 S. V.
CHNROPI=1

-- ------.-.-.- -..--- -.-----------------________________________________________________________________________________________ ~1

'O)tIUN VM IN BULCARIA
(The New York Timcs)
Though the Communist revolt
Bulgar'a has been exaggerated int

in
d(is-

Did you ever stop to think how
much easier your work would be if
you had a nice, shiny Corona Type--
.11 ..+,..~ ~lvtxl" "x. ..4....~t

II
I

Lunches
Fountain
-.
709 N -NI~

writer to (to all yunoe
patches from Paris, Belgrade afnd Sa- t -rL:;,
you no ys, rots
thliemes, and letters home? Sure, you
loniki, inference from such news as cal learn to wite. Woell teach ylo.
has been allowed to coe through the ''$50 ys a 1 1'v ', $"0 a pertectfly
good one. O1ther makes of typewrit-
censorship from Sofia indicate that it crs t aken in part pa ynent.

I
is
::
'

\1

' Nt -is serious. There sems to have been{
Sport tote r
This 'game of Ma Jongg we consid- some fighting in the capital itself,:
er the worst blight that has fallen which is heavily garrisoned: and
upon the country in some years, tak- through the country. though indiv'd-
ing into consideration also the Ku ual Communist risings are soon sup-
Klux Klan and the boll weevil. Any pressed,, it is admitted that they show'
game that involves excited shouts of unexpected recuperative power.
"Punk" and "Chow" is bound to be Premier Tsankoff may be:sincere in
considered just the least bit nutty by j saying that Bulga'ria is fighting the
the manager of this column. The world's battle against the Third Inter-
game starts with the construction of national. Doubtless the Russians have
a wall out of the little dinguses tl-'ey helped start the fire; though Tchitch-
call "tiles"; only nobody in the game erin, naturally, asserted some six
is quite sure just which ones you E weeks ago that the incriminating doc-
pick up and lay along the top. After uments supposed to have been found
some dice-shaking that we never did in the possession of the Russian Red
quite understand, somebody says, Cross Mission in Bulgaria had been
"Gee you're lucky!" And when you planted there by the Tsankoff Govern-
ask why, they say you're the East ment.
wind, you poor fish. Then they ask if
you have any flowers. Gosh! And
then, you start punging and chowingYE
and shouting out red dragon and greenetray Il
elephant and rubber duck and six J MTI
bamboo and three dot and all of a
sudden somebody howls out Ma Jongg
and everybody else says oh darn. And The Crisis
then it tuns out that this guy has the Germany, with Dr. Gessman as mil-
hand from heaven and everybody pays ! itary dictator, was quiet last night.
him ten dollars. . . - The Stresemann government is ap-
Someday we are going to make a parently successfully weathering the
deck of cards out of ivory and plat- crisis that was precipitated by the
ium and take it over to China and surrender to France in the Ruhr. The
gvet the coolies hot'over the ancient communists throughout the Ruhr are
American game of slap-jack, and sells advocating the continuance of the pas-
'em the deck for $37.50 special. sie resistance policy. Flaring pla-
* * *cards are posted over the district pro-
We left our office a minute ago and claiming a general strike and urgang
when we came back we found our opposition both to the Berlin govern-
typewriter missing and when we ment and to the French military au-
found that we didn't find the copy in thorities.
it. The guy that swiped the type- -
writer had thoughtfully taken it out The solving of the difficult Ruhr
and put it in the wastebasket. Oh, question is now wholly in the hands
yes, ie rolled it up in a. ball first of the inhabitants of that district. If
. . . . And yet they expect us to the Ruhr populat on resumes work
be in a rollicking good humor all the and thus translates into action the
time. Goodness! orders issued by the government to
* * * abandon passive resistance, repara-
Personal--To Edgar G. Schumm Ijtion negotiations with Berlin will be-
A contest entry attempts to insult gin at once. When once again the
us by comparing us with Chimes, but hum of factories and the noise of toil-
his blow misses because he address- ing men is heard throughout the con-
es his contribution to "Breakfast tinent the clouds will soon begin to
Rolls", which may be very delicious clear over European skies.

4 ._.._. _y . i
, ^--^--.. . .- --...., ,-... . ....., ..,. ._.,. a. .,......._.,_.........o.,. ,,,..
.. :. , . t r..iaa. , '

0.D.MORRILL,
17 NCREA, ARCA DE
The Tylype~writer ad stadI eryI Slor
L. C. h and Corona Typewrite. -
Dai y classified for real results.

i st Semester*

Clas s s

" Cob r

1

SHIORTH AND
SEC A E A .I. U TRAINING
COMM~ ERC1AL TEACH ING
CLASSLES All\! NGE TO IT YOUR PROGRAM
Business College
STATE and WIL AM 6R'. _'1 S ANN ARBOR

of a freshman is far from being a bed
of roses, but many of the hard knocks
can be lessened by the observance of 1
a little practical advice.
It is inevitable that the first year
man should feel out of place in the
new environment of life at Michigan.
Situations often arise during the
course of the year wherein the more
experienced advice of an older man
will prove acceptable to the worried
freshman. Adjustment to university
conditions comes only as the result
of time and it is important that during
this formative period the yearling
should be under the guidance of a
junior or senior.'
The authorities of the University
try to do everything to get the newj
students started along the right
track and the appointment of the
upperclass advisors is an old idea
that has met with success in othert
universities throughout the country.
The freshman "bible" treats certain
subjects in such a limited manner
that the new man may wish a more
detailed explanation of them; if such
is the case he should call on his ad-.

After a week of idleness the edi-
torial writers in NewnYork resume
xwork. We predict a great demand for
expe -rt typewriter repairmen.
There are two places on this world
where we do not want to live right
now-one is Oklahoma and the other
is the Ruhr.
Twenty-Five Years
Ago At Michigan
Fromthe files of the V. of M. Dally,
September 30, 1898.
The Kappa Sigma fraternity will
occupy a new house this year on Ann
St. near the University hospital.
Prof. F. C. Newcombe has charge
of the admiristrative work of the de-
partnent of botany in the absence of
Prof. V. M. Spalding who has been
given a year's leave of absence.
It has been widely rumored that
Detroit will introduce a bill into the
coming legislature instituting a school
of art in that city, and authorizing
the removal of the Lewis and Ran-
dolph Rogers collections !rom the
University art gallery, to be placed
in the new school. Should this be

3
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4 QUALIT'Y.
RioF

4rMW OGYnRSN:AtiT 'Mta P'+fl!.

U~RALITY T
Tit

a,... ..n ....,. ....,.._. t,..s. ....,. ...,... a i; ....

for all we know bur we woud like I
to say here and now for the last Our Exp
damnable time that the name of this News comes that
here confection is TOASTED ROLLS. model its new gove
Incidentally, this guy gives himself government of thisc
away as being a inveterate reader Primo Rivera, it is
of Breaktast Table Chat, which col- ed to reform the
umn is composed by our dear fellow- Spanish parliament

erience
Spain intends to
ernment after the
country. President
said, is determin-
relations of the
and the ministry

r'q Iy a , } " K 1
I7 l-

Cnaware and
Glass
Pere are just a few of the many
slendid ofc-s (luring this event.
Soime in sets and some in pattern
plcices to fill in breakages. All at
pri:ces that are an opportunity for
r-eal cconomuy.

visor. Co-operation is essential to
the success of the plan and freshmen
who have not yet communicated with
their advisors do so immediately.

3
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t
E

UITTY AT MICIGANc
Michigan is over-organized. Wet
have on the campus today a great'
maze of clubs, societies, councils,.
committees and other bodies, each

worker for the good of humanity, Ed-j
gar Guest. That's all for today, Ed-t
gar.
* * *
Excerpts from Rev. Herbert A.
Jump's Creed for Ann Arbor, publish-
ed in yesterday's final edition of the

into a constitutional system strongly
resembling the congressional plan of
the United States. Spain has a great
advantage. One hundred and fifty
years of operation have revealed many
defects in our system of government.

i

INTO r a TIQPPF1.) rn

11!

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