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October 24, 1923 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-10-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1923

THE MICHIgAN DAILY

QOUISIANI PLANS Leads Fight For

i

Leads Fight For
Walton's Remova
Invitations Are Sent to Cabinet Men-
hers, Governors and - -h
Others -
TO DISCUSS REFORESTRATION -
POLICY IN SOUTHERN STATES
Invitations have been issued by Gov.
John Parker of Louisiana to members
of President Coolidge's cabinet, gov- --
ernors of the various states, United j
States senators and congressmen in-
viting them to ,attend a forestry re- -
.,clamation, and home-making confer-
ence to be held in New Orleans, Nov.
L9-22-.
The purpose of the conference, as
expressed by officials, was "a desire1
to provide opportunities for creating
self-supporting farm homes as a mode
of living and to produce men and cit-
izens rather than to produce merely Representative W. D. McBee
moneyl Representative McBee, of Stephens
Would Reclaim Useless Land locounty, is chairman of the committee
The conference is also to decide on of the Oklahoma legislature which
methods of reclaiming the large areas called the special session to prefer
of cut-over, swamp and over-flowed impeachment charges against Gov.
lands. Large parts of these lands can Walton. Representative McBee led the)
also be used for reforestration pro- fight against the governor which cul-I
jects which will greatly increase their minated yesterday in suspension of the
value. chief executive by the Oklahoma Sen-
The executive committee states that, ate, pending impeachment proceed-
"this movement will not afford oppor- ings.
tunity for unloading upon state or fed -_
eral governments of the people large'
blocks of waste lands and no large op-COMMERCE CHAMBER
propriations from the public treasury T O H E A R COUZENS
Sis involved. It will protect settlers
against xdangers of exploitation in the
development and settlepnent of the The Ann Arbor Chamber of Com-
country's vacant areas in the future." merce held its weekly luncheon. yes-
n West More Active terday noon. A number of members,
On the same subject Governor Par- of the Woman's clubs were present
.~krsays,',:"I' this matter the west- ofteWmnscuswr ren
ern states have perhaps been more and Mrs. Homer Jarrison outlined the
fully alive to conditions than we of wvork of the Woman's club in .Ann Ar-
the South and East. It is begin- bor, and expressed their desire to
ning to be appreciated that if we are erect a club house some time in the
to continue to advance or even to near future.
hold our own we must study what oth- After this talk, a play, "Indiffer-
ers have done and improve upon our ence", was presented by members of
methods of land reclamation, settle- Women's club.
ment, and other essentials to the de-' Senator James; Couzens will ad-

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PLAYERS TO PRE SENT
TWO COMEDIES TONIGH
Two short laugh-making comedies
are on the opening program to be pre-
sented by Players club at 8:15 o'clock
tonight in Sarah Caswell Angell hall.
In "The Trysting Place", by Booth
Tarkington, the town and campus or-
ganization will have a chance to give
its audience one act of comedy in its
lightest and most carefree mood.
"What They Think", by Rachael Cro-
thers, is not so light a composition as
the other but it is said to be quite
as attractive.
The names of those to appear in the
productions include a number of ex-
perienced amateurs, several from last
year's plays. One of the unique fea-
tures in connection with Players club
performances is the fact that all their
senic effects are built and arranged
by members of the Players club work-
shop. This end of the business of
production has been going on this
year under the supervision of Ross L.
Taylor, '24.
Admission of 35 cents will be col-
lected at the door. Holders of mem-
bership cards will have free entrance
to all performances.
The cast of "The Trysting Place"
will be: Jessie Eleta Seeley, '26;
Lancelot Briggs, Warren Parker, '26;
Mrs. Briggs, Florence Nelson, '25;
Mrs. Curtiss, Ernestine Roe, '24; Ru-
pert Smith, Clifford DeLong, '24; Mr.
Ingoldsby, George Miller. Knisely,
'25, and Stacy Black, '24, president of
the club.
"What They Think" will have fol-
lowing cast: The Boy, Jack Hassber- I
ger, '2% The Girl, Dorothy Bolton, '25;
The Woman, Mrs. Mary I. McEach-
ern, spec. and The Man, Donald 0.
Cook, '24. Mary Noble, spec. Is di-
decting the play.
MICHIGAN SONSMAY GO
TO SCHOOLSAND CLUSI
Michigan song books may be -furn-
ished to high school scholars and clubs
throughout the state it was announced
yesterday by T. Hawley Tapping,
field -secretary of the Alumni associa-
tion. This demand has been felt for
some time and the latest expression
of opinion has come from John Wat-
son, ex-74M, now commissioner of
schools of Gogebic county.1
In a letter to Prof. John B. Edmun-'
son, inspector of high schools, he
says:
"At different times, when Universi-
ty men have visited Ironwood, I have
suggested, to them that the Uiversity
authorities or the alumni should get
out a cheap edition of the Michigan
songs so that they could be distribut-
ed small cost to the high schools of
Business
Leadership
EARN the fund amental principles of
business and their application to daily
business problems. To help you mini
mize ethe time, usually spent in gaining
experience, the intensive, oneyear training
course of the Babson Institute is offered.
From actual experience the fundamental
principles of business are made clear. By
positive examples, the student is shown how
to apply these principles in the conduct of
every day commercial affairs.
Write for Booklet
f Send for booklet "Training for Business
Leadership." Describes the courses in detail
and gives complete information about the
facilities of Babson Institute and shows how
men are trained for executive roles. Write
today. No obligation.
Babson Institutel[
318 Washngton Ave.
Babson Park, ( 0f )Mass.

the state, the Rotary, Kiwanis, Lions,
Women's and other clubs. H1owever',
they have never actedqmpon the sug-
gestion.
"Not so long ago, wlin Coach Yost1
was here the committee had some
printed and we sang them at the ban-
quet. It was rather slow going at
first but I had the fellows sing them
several times and towards the last
they were going fine. Since that time
we have been singing them at the
Rotary club."
New Union Service

a NNUAL

MIMES TOURNEY

Proves Popular
'Phone, calls poured into the Union
yesterday, the many inquirers wanting
to know just who was eligible to en-
ter the ladies dining room frors 3 to
5:30 o'clock every afterioon, or at
noon for the special luncheon, when
delicious home-cooked food would be
served. The new luncheonette ser-
service started yesterday, and many.
expressions of approval were heard.
Dainties of every description, pre-
pared exactly as at ,home, were
served.
Membersaof the Union, wives, moth-
ers and sisters of members, and hold-
ers of guest cards, are those who
may avail themselves of the service.
In addition, the wives, mothers and
sisters of members, can obtain ad-
mission cards which will entitle
them to bring guests to, the Union.
Members of the Union have the priv-
ilege of issuing guest cards a maxi-
mum of six times a year to any one
non-member, each period being of two
weeks duration. A member may is-
sue guest cards to as many different
individuals as he cares to, however.
The rules regarding those who are
eligible to secure the afternoon ser-
vice are exactly the same as those
which peitain to any of the dining
room service in theUnion, and are a
part of the house rules.
Republicans Postpone Meeting
The regular bi-monthly meeting of
('the University Republican club,
which was to be held in the Union to-
night, has been postponed .until next
Wednesday. At this time Joseph
Joseph, '26L, will read a paper on
"The Evolution of Political Parties".
The Club is open to all University
students interested in the discussion
of current political questions.

'will be the judges of the event, their je tls a e
votes to be totaled at the end of the!A i e t i a
T0 BEGIN i[ T Wsecond evening performance, and the Appears InState
-- decision then announced Any frater-
A1imes' campus dramatic tourna- nity house is eligible to enter a team I
ment will be held Friday and Satur- in its own name, or the team may en- Trichiniasis, the d i s e a s e that
day evening, Nov. 2 and 3 at the ter independent of fraternal connec- stopped the ancient Hebrews from eat-
Mimes theater. This semi-annual tions ing pork due to their belief that swine
tourney -in which any student, or Before the final contest, prelimin- are devil-infested is once more in evi-
group of students may enter an act, aries will be held in which the right dence. Of a family near Sand lake.
will be a competitive contest akin to number of contestants will be select- conisting of father, mother, three
that held by Mimes Dramatic society ed William Kratz, '24E, general boys and three girls, all but the fath-
last year, and to the winner wil be chairman of the Union Opera commit- er have been stricken by the disease.
given a silver loving cup, soon to be I tees, has charge of the affair Let- This is the first authentic case to be
on display at the Union. ters explaining the contest will be reported in Michigan in ten years.
!mailed to the fraternities and groups Trichiniasis is not a communicable
later. disease and the packing houses prac-
tically eliminated the disease years
NURSES HOCKEY SEASON ago. From miscroscopic examinations
E -WA of swine flesh made by government
inspections dating since 1892, only
one to two animals per thousand were
COMING SUNDAY (Continued from Page Thrce) shown to be infected. But pork well
J !tournament should send in a u com- cooked is safe food, whether infected
By Jv plete list of their players with their or not.
respective positions to the gymnas- The Department of Health has the
Sucth saugtsteyna-Sand lake outbreak under advisement
Suc Lau i m at once. The first game is tormor- and the batch of hogs responsible are
onchaKnowrow and Miss Erley wants everyone being located to prevent recurrences
out whether her house is to play that of the disease.
day or not. Each team should wear its
house colors, cheer-leaders will be on It's true efficiency to use Daily
hand to get cooperation in the yell- Classifieds.-Adv.
A ALL PARKER PENS ARE MADE BY dDUOFOLD CRAFTSMEN
Written with a Parker by
H.P.("Brick") Muller,
California'agreat football captain
Take a Look at. This
ParkerQ$
Three Rousing Cheers eA New 'Banded'Black 'Pen
And All That c Special 'Pen for Students
Sort of-Rot! Has large ring that links it to your note-book
or a pocket-clip-Free
t Just imagine one of the fun- THE idea of a super-smooth medium
1 niest stories in all fiction in priced pen with good ink-capacity
the hands of the master and a large ring-end to link to the ring of
director who made your note-book originated with students
"THE COVERED WAGON" themselves. We acknowledge our indebt-
edness, and we know their idea is a winter
for wherever this new Parker D. Q. has
been introduced it has stepped right off in
_ - the lead of the medium-priced class.
Moreover, this Parker D. Q. is produced
by the makers of the Parker Duofold-
Y G IFTS everywhere acknowledged as the fountain
pen classic. Not only in craftsmanship, but
in all mechanical features save the color
otograph and point, it is like the Parker Duofold.Yet

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velopment of small self-supporting dress members of the Cpamber of
farm homes. Commerce at their regular ' noon'
MEANS- luncheon Nov. 6. .
Stinnes Fights Stahdard Oil Minlster to Poland on Leave
Dusseldorf, Oct 23.-The Nachrich- Washington, Oct. 23.-Hugh S. Gib-
etn says Stinnes interests have formed son, American minister to Poland is
a concern with 100,000,000 gold marks coming to the United States in Novei.-
captial to fight Standard Oil. ber, on leave of absence.

DAINT~
Your Ph
BY

Mel
their
quali
stant

'S
ever
edIo
Los
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con-
tion.
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R idSdi
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THE LINE ARTISTIC

Don't put off your appointment for your
Michiganennias picture

'0 one
gets tir
achrin
r unfai
ty is a
satisfac
IGINA

f

PHONE 598

121 E. WASHINGTON

k

MELACHRINO
"The One Cigarete Sold the World Over"

WHITNEY
Saturday N'ight0T' EAT ERE

r.

=~

TEtqEw )beK
CLOBE IffNATRFS
WORLD AMOUS
USICAL COIMEDY

I

I

OPENINcr
UP14 DOOR
TO A FEAST
OF
FUN
MUSIC
'9as

?'S NTETAINERS
(IPL.EIE Al.GIM
r)DntcTION_

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