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January 08, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-01-08

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fTHE WEATHER
'FAIR AND RISING TEM~.
PERATURE

Y

Lie ~ ait

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AMD NIGHlT WIRE
SERTICE

I'

I

.......

i

I

VOL. XXXII. No. 75 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN,

IRISH CONGRESS
JGGEPTS TREAT
IN..LOSE DOTE
DAIL EIREANN AGREES TO PACT
MAKiNG COUNTRY FREE
STATE
DE VALERA FORMALLY
RESIGNS PRESIDENCY
Enthusiastic Cheering Greets News of
Raiication Expected
Hourly
(By Associated Press)
Dublin, Jan. 8.-The treaty creating
an Irish free state was ratified tonight
by a majority of seven votes, 64 to 56,
when the Dail Eireann gave its ap-
proval on the document signed by its
delegates at London.
Coincidedly Eamonn De Valera an-
nounced his resignation from the pres-
idency of the Irish republic.
Crowds Approve
The news was received with the
greatest enthusiasm and the patient
crowds, which had waited for hours
outside the university buildings in an-
ticipation of the decisoin, burst into
cheering even before the official fig-
ures were announced.
Ratification of the treaty came after
a day of intense excitemetit and heated
controversy. Although the results were
as had been expected, the major-
ity in favor of the agreement was
greater than had been counted on al-
most up to the last minute.
De Valera spoke and finally broke
down so completely that he was un-
able to proceed. The Dail with one
accord, applauded and cheered him.
The situation at the adjournment of
the Dail will meet on Monday and
there is no disposition revealed by De
Valera and his followers to abandon
the factional struggle.
Army Now a Problem
The future control of the Irish re-
publican army is tonight the subject
of anxious speculation, as Charles
Burgess, who strongly opposed the
treaty, is the minister of defense.
Ireland shall have the same con-
stitutional status as the Dominion of
Canada, the commonwealth of Austra-
lia, the Dominion of New Zealand and
the Union of South Africa and shall be
known officially as the Irish Free
State.
The treaty stipulates that a rep-
resentative of the crown shall be ap-
pointed for Ireland in the same man-
ner as the governor general of Can-
ada.
Ireland is given control over all
governmental affairs and is entitled to
an army which shall not be larger
in proportion to Ireland's population
than the British army is to the popu-
lation of Great Britian.
Ulster is included within the scope
of the treaty on provision as made for
here to declare herself out within one
month after an act of the British par-
liam ent ratfyng the treaty, and to
contribute under a present regime on
provision that the government of Ire-
land as in 1920.
SUNDAY SERICES IN
ANN RBOR CHURCHES
Memories of Christmas as well as
plans for the new year will be in-
cluded in the programs of Ann Arbori
churches today. A large number of
out of town speakers and faculty
members will address the services.
A sermon on H. G. Well's "Outlines
of History," will mark the morning
service at the Unitarian church. Speci-
al music has also been arranged for

this service. In the evening service
at 6:30 o'clock, Dean Hugh Cabot, of
the Medical school, will speak espec-
ially to the younger people on "The
Essentials of Life from the Physician's
Point of View."
At the Baptist church the sermon
will be given as usual at 10:30 o'c ock.
The topics for the Guild meeting at
6:30 o'clock will be "Do Your Christ-
mas Shopping Early."
"Bible Leading Nations to the Sav-
- or" will be the topic for the sermon
at 11:30 o'clock at the St. Paul's Luth-
eran church. While "The Christ As-
suming His Office" will be the theme
at the service at 10:30 o'clock at the
Zion Lutheran church. Both of these
churches will conduct all of their reg-
ular services.
Pres. John W. Laird, of Albion col-
lege, will give the fourth of the Wes-
leyan Guild lectures at 7:30 o'clock
in the Methodist church on "The Marks
of the Real Man." In the morning
Dr. Stalker will give the sermon on
"The imagination and Religion."' Spe-
mrntrmn n Psta Fir mi

Great Biologist
To Lecture Here
Prof. William Bateson, director of
John Innes Horticultural Institution
at Merton Park, Surrey, England, will'
deliver a University lecture at 8
o'clock next Wednesday evening in
Natural Science auditorium, on theJ
subject of "Somatic Mutation."
Professor Bateson is considered one
of the greatestdbiologists in the Brit-
ish empire, and is a world autnority
on heredity and evolution, having writ-
ten several books on these subjects.
During the recent meeting of the
American Association for the Advance-
ment of Science, which met in Toron-
to, Professor Bateson gave the prin-
cpal address. He was brought to
America as the guest of this associa-
tion and the American Society of Zoo-
logists. During the past week he has
delivered a series of lectures in Tor-
onto. He will visit only four univer-
sities in this country.
PLANS DRAWN FOR
DETROIT BRDG
U. S. and Canada Will Be Connected
by Longest Single Span
in World

ARCH TO
FOR

HAVE THREE DECKS
ALL TYPES OF TRAFFIC,

All preliminary construction plans
for the new international suspension
bridge between Detroit and Windsor.
Ont., have been completed, according
to a statement Saturday by Prof. Hen-
ry E. Riggs, of the civil engineering
department, a member of, the engi-
neering board of the bridge project.
Final detailed plans will be drawn up
as soon as the financial arrangements
necessary for the actual construction
'>f the bridge are completed. Charles
Evan Fowler, chief engineer, hopes
that the construction work may be
',egun in the spring, states Professor
Riggs.
Span of 1,802 Feet
The bridge, which will be built by
the Canadian Transit company and
'he American Transit company with.
the approval of the United States and
^anadian governments, will have the
longest single span in the world.
measuring 1,802 feetror more than a
third of a mile. Street car, automo-
bile, and pedestrian traffic will be
9,ccommocated on the upper of its two
decks, while the lower will be con-
Ined to passenger and freight train
service.
Suspended from two towers dach
R feet high. the span. 97 feet in
width, will be supported by six ca-
hies each 21 inches in diameter and
two cables 18 inches in diameter, with
a capacity together- of supporting
146,000,000 pounds. Among the points
-f special engineering interest about
the bridge, says Professor Riggs, will
be the hinged main piers and the an-
choring for the cables.
The promoting comnanies have been
authorized to issue $30,000,000 in se-
'urities for the project. The pur-
',hase of shore space for the ap-
proaches is under way. If the work
,s commenced next spring the upper
deck should be ready for service with-
in four years. It is planned then to
begin construction of the lower deck,
which should be finished in two years
more.
Engineer Well Known
"Charles Evan Fowler, chief engi-
neer, is one of the internationally
prominent bridge engineers in the
country," states Professor Riggs. "He
has been consulting engineer in bridg-
°s for 20 years, and built the Williams-
burg bridge, New York, the Knoxville.
Tennessee, canti'ever bridge, and the
arch bridge at White Pass, Alaska."
Mr. Fowler spoke here on bridge con-
struction last month.
Associated with Mr. Fowler in the
arection of the international bridge
are Professor Riggs, George H. Pe-
gram, chief engineer of the Interbor-
ough Rapid Transit company, New
York, William H. Burr, professor
emeritus of civil engineering, Colum-
bia university, Col. C. M. Monserrat, of
Montreal, and Prof. C. . Young, of
the University of Toronto.

CONFERENCE VOTES
OgINPOISONcgs
Five Great Powers Form Agreement,
But Extend Invitation to
Other Nations
ONLY TWO TOPICS LEFT FOR
ACTION OF ARMS CONVENTION
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 8. - The Wash-
ington conference practically complet-
ed its permanent limitation today by
voting poison gas into the discard.
As in the case of the new rules gov-
erning submarines, the provision
against use of gas in future wars was
adopted by the five great powers as
actionable among themselves with an
invitation to the rest of the world to
join in the agreement.
That left on the permanent list of
the conference only two topics-lim-
tation of air craft and general re-t
vision of the rules of warfare-and
both seemed likely tonight to be pass-
ed over without definite action.
An air warfare sub-committee has
reported after weeks of study that lim-
itation of aeroplanes appears imprac-
ticable until a conference of wider
scope has been convened, although it
has been suggested that some restric-
tion of lighter than air craft might be
worth attempting.
A future world wide conference for
the consideration of the rules of war
has also been suggested and senti-
muents among the delegates seem to
favor it. Italy, however, hopes to
see the present negotiations devel-
op some agreement against bombard-
ment against fortified cities.
So far has the armament discussion
proceeded that some delegations are
'looking forward to a plenary session
of the conference by Wednesday or
Thursday of next week to publish to
the world the completed limitations
treaty and to report the further steps
that have been taken in regard to the
Far East.
FRITZ KRLEULR, WORLD
RENOWNED ViOlINIST,
PLAYSMHERETOMOROW
ARTIST WILL PRESENT CONCERT
PROGRAM ON CHORAL UNION
/ SERIES
With 22 years of successful work on
the concert stage since his mature
debut at Berlin in 1899, Fritz Kres-
1er. world famous violinist, is again
making a tour of the United States
and will be heard at 8 o'clock tomor-
row night -in Hill auditorium in a
"oncert program under the Choral
Union series.
Kreiser is nearly 47 years old, but
those who have heard him this season
say be has the same irresistible ap-
peal and the same high technical and
interpretative skill as 4lways, with
the added charm of a few more ripen-
ing years.
His complete program is as fol-
lows:
Sonata, A major .......Cesar Franck
(For piano and violin)
Allegretto ben moderato
Allegro
Recitative-Fantasia
Allegretto poco mosso
Suite, E major ................Bach
Prelude
Loure
Gavotte
Menuetto 1 and 2
Gigue
kndantino...........Padre Martini
Rondo ....... ..............Mozart
Ballet Music to "Rosamunde"....
.......... Schubert
Two Slavonic Dances. Dvorak-Keisler
Two Caprices...........Wieniawski
Carl Lamson, accompanist

Student Tour Of
Trance Planned
Plans are under way for the car-
rying on of a trip to France of 10
weeks' duration during the summer
vacation for American teachers and
students. The purpose is to permit
American students and teachers to
study in France at a minimum cost.
Each university group will be under
the direct supervision of a well-
known professor of romance language
during the entire trip.
The curriculum includes grammar,
phonetics, diction, composition, his-
Iory, literature, and French civiliza-
tion. After six weeks of study have
been completed a certificate of study
will be presented.
The program as planned for the 10
weeks includes three weeks ocean
trip, six weeks study, and one week
in Paris for those whose study has
not taken them there. . The party will
leave New York July 1, and return

(By Leo. J. Hershdorfer)
Twice blessed was Friday, Jan. 7,
for it brought with it the first week-
end of the new year and also the
January issue of Chimes. There have
been other week-ends ,aye, many of
them, and there will be many more,
too. Some have been joyful, others
sad, and the rest just interesting,
nothing more nor less. There have
been other issues of Chimes, aye, many
of them, and there will be many
more, too. Some have been joyful (to
read), others sad, and the rest just in-
teresting, c'est tout. This issue, while'
on the whole commendable, is one of
"the rest."I
"Bud" Rea's "Thousand Words" are
perhaps the most pleasing of all, for
they are convincing, plain, and
straight-from-the-shoulder. There Is
no attempt at bantering or shoulder-
patting in this article. Ra has some-
thing vital to say to the campus,
CO MEDY CLUB PLAY
HAS STRONG CAST
Organization Will Present Shaw's
"Pygmalion" at Whitney
January 18
SETS OF ORIGINAL DESIGN
iEPORTED EXTRAORDINARY
The production of Bernard Shaw's
"Pygmalion" on Jan. 18 at the Whit-
ney theater "will be in every respect
the most elaborate production yet un-
dertaken by Comedy club in its 38
years of existence." is the prophecy
made by Prof. J .Raleigh Nelson, di-
rector of the performance.
The choice of this play is of par-
ticular appeal to a college audience.
The plot hinges on an experiment,
made by Prof. Henry Higgins, an ec-
centric phonetic expert, in which he
transforms a Cockney flower girl in-
to a duchess by the mere change in
her speech. The play is B'ernard.
Shaw in his lightest vein.
Mildred Henry Takes Lead
The cast is an unusually strong one,
even subordinate parts being taken by
some of the most experienced of cam-
nus amateur actors. Mildred Henry,I
'22, who pays the part of Eliza the
Cockney flower girl, will be remem-
bered as the Amy of Barrie's "Alice-
Sit-by-the-Fire," Comedy club's play of
two years ago.
Henry Herrmann, '23. who takes the
nart of Prof. Henry Higgins. has had
considerable semi-professional exneri-
ence, in the Little Theater guild at
Washington, D. C.
Settings are being constructed by
O. S. Davis, of Detroit, after original
designs by Professor Nelson. They
will consist of the portico of St.
Paul's cathedral, Professor Higgins'
laboratory, and the drawing room of
Mrs. Higgins' house on the Chelsea
embankment. Several who have seen
Mr. Davis during the past week at
work on the settings report that they
are of more than the usual beauty.
Professor Nelson has stated that
costumes and properties are also be-
ing very carefully designed and chos-
en for a harmonious, artistic effect. J.
R. Hurschfield ,of Detroit, will have
charge of the make-up.
Expert Aids.
The cast has been working on the
play for over seven weks, rehearsals
being held daly. During the Christ-
mas holidays Mildred Henry, taking
the part of Eliza, studied extensively
under Doris Dretzka, who played this
role in Sam Hume's production of
Pygmalion recently in Detroit. Mrs.
Dretzka has for years made a serious
study of the difficult Cockney dialect.
and very generously consented to as-
sist in the role. It is understood that
Mrs. Dretzka expects to attend the
performance as a guest of the club.!
Tickets go on sale Wednesday at 8
o'clock at Graham's book store. Re-
served seats may be obtained at that
store until Tuesday, Jan. 17, after
which reservations will be made at
the Whitney theater.
BUREAU FURNISHFS
BUT LITTLE WORK

Employment for students continues
slow, according to Mrs. Stuart, who is
.n charge of the University Employ-
ment bureau. During the holidays
many professors required the services
of clerical and stenograuhic help in
the preparation of reports, which re-
sulted in a demand for student heln.
Also there were many calls for help
at holiday social functions in Ann Ar-1
bor. But now things have swung
back to normal, with few openings for
board jobs but the usual demand for.
students to do odd jobs.
Engineers Taking Medical Exams
Physical examinations have been re-
sumed by the University Health serv-
ice, the engineers now reporting for
their examinations. It will be several
weeks before the engineers are all ex-

SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 1922 PRICE FIVE CENTS
fanuary Chimes Presents Variety JVOGE B1 LINDSEY
Of Articles Of Timely Intrestj -.ri

something the student body should
know about the basketball situation at
Michigan-and he minces no words in
the telling, either.
Follows an article on "That Michi-
gan Band," with George W. Collins
giving a fairly well-written history of
that grand old institution. James G.
Frey, '22, co-author of the article, in
true pleading style that "'gets over,"
asks for more financial aid for the
band.
In "The Rainmaker Extraordinary,"
the story which took second prize in
the Chimes' short story contest, Har-
riet C. Wilcox, '23, presents an odd
plot, peculiar characters, and a style
little more than mediocre (with all
due apologies to the contest judges).
Many good stories have been written
about Mexico and Mexicans, but they
were all the works of authors who
knew something about the country and
its people. It is in this respect that
the story exceeds its limits - it's a
long stretch from Montijo Bay to Ann
Arbor. But, the author has made an
attempt to write a good story, and an
attempt is always deserving of praise.
Louis Elbel, '00, composer of "The
Victors," has contributed an article
which is truly artistic, both in tem-
perament and in style. To the under-
graduate today the fame of Michi-
gan's battle hymn the country over isI
a source of joy, but little does he know
of the history of the song. Read what
Ebel has to say-it is very much
wo th while.-
larence Hatch, Jr., '22, wields the,
pen of an experienced sports writer
in his treatise on the 1922 basketball
team. Hardy Hoover's ncvelette, "Fu-
tility," is up to the standard of those
which he has previously contributed.
Joe Allen's two poems, "To Michi-
gan" and "You," appear in the issue,
but, truth to tell ,they only-appear.
"You," however, is the more pleasing
of the two--even Whimsies might ac-
cept it.
Katherine Montgomery, '22, in the
article, "Another Union-for Women
Only," gives an account of the plans,.
purpose and functions of the new
home of the league. The customary
book-reviews, and the "Hot Off the
Diagonal" department, which is more
than usually interesting, complete the
issue.

ILELLb RUUILNUL
"WHY KIDS LIE"
TREATS ALL VIOLATORS OF LAW
WITH FRIENDLINESS AND
SYMPATHY
FEAR OF POLICE FACTOR
IN JUVENILE INJUSTICE
Gang and Family Also Responsible
-For Major Part of Youthful
Delinquency
"There aren't any bad people and
there aren't any good people in, the
world-there are just people," was the
axiom ,of Judge Ben B. Lindsey's lec-
ture on "Why Kids Lie" last night in
Hill auditorium. Through all of Judge
Lindsey's 22 years of service on the
bench as a judge this axiom has been
his guiding law, and experience has
taught him that it is the truth, he
said.
Judge Lindsey, therefore, treats
bad boys and crooks as people con-
demning their wrongs, but not them,
and establishing bonds of friendliness
and sympathy rather than of antagon-
ism with the children, that come before
him. The judge talked nearly two
hours relating interesting personal ex-
periences ranging from the pranks of
the small "kid," to the crimes of the
desperate boy bandit. He went on to
show "the job" is to teach them to be
afraid to lie and to steal.
In placing the responsibility for
juvenile crimes and the major offenses
of the youth Judge Lindsey indicated
the share of the policemen, the gang,
and the parents. It is his judgment
from all his experience with cases of
this kind that fear ae the policeman
is a great factor in juvenile injustice.
In dealing of the gang, Judge Lindsey
said that one has to understand that
one of the fundamental laws of their
world is loyality to one another, that
one boy must not tell on the others, or
in the vernacular of the street, he must
not snitch."
That parents are of two kinds was
another of the facts which the judge
brought out, those who are sure that
their boys are innocent and those who
are not s sure. He has becme ,on-
vinced that there 'are unseen chains
which bind a criminal that are by far
stronger than those of brass or steel.
The phychological, physiological, and
sociological elements were also dem-
onstrated as playing a part in the de-
velopment of the criminal type of In-
dividual.
In conclusion Judge Lindsey said,
"The struggle is for justice. There is
no justice without love. We must learn
how to put a little love into law."
HOCKEY TEAM PLAYS
M. A. C. WEDNESDAY

MUNICIPAL
131? Pu
sooDn,

OWNERSHIP
LIC UTILI~iES
CLAIMS LINDSEY

PRAISES MAYOR COUZENS FOR
CONgTRUCTIVE WORK IN
DETROIT
Interviewed as to the influence of
"big business" in American city poli-
tics, Judge Ben B. Lindsey, who de-
livered a lecture last evening in Hill,
auditorium on "Why Kids Lie," said:
"I am certainly strong for the munici-
pal ownership of public utilities, for
there will be corruption in our city
government go long as the people per-
mit the city purse to lie around where
dishonest and corrupt politicians can
get their hands on it. It is a clear
violation of business ethics to permit
business men to have a monopoly of
things which are necessary to the
comforts of life and it is the most
corruptible influence in the American
life today. This is the cause of our
evils in city government and we must
get rid of it. .
"The time will come," continued the
Judge, "when the people have got to
take charge of public utilities." The
Judge illustrated his point by refer-
ring to an article in this month's
American magazine entitled "The
Busiest Executive in America," saying
that it was a crime to hold up be-
fore the American youth the standards
. by which the men referred to in this
article had attained success.
Judge Lindsey referred to the work
of Mayor Couzens of Detroit as typi-
cal of a man endeavoring to do honest
and constructive work for his &-ty.
Judge Lindsey said he was talking
Saturday with a citizen of Detroit who
remarked that Mayor Couzens was
being snubbed in many of the clubs to
which he belongs in Detro t because
he had dared to challenge the corrupt
politicians of Detroit who sought to
get rich at the expense of the citi-
zens of that city.
TO HOLD FUNFRAL SFRVICES
FOR LAD DROWNED IN RIVER
Funeral services for Robert McKay,
14 year old high school boy of Ann
Arbor who was drowned while skat-
ing on the Huron river Friday after-
noon, will be held Monday afternoon
at his home, 607 E. Liberty street.
McKay was skating some distance
from his companions and near the
open water in the middle of the river
which the swift current keeps free
from ice, when he broke through.
BAST(ET-;ALT, SCORES
Chicago 25, 0. S. U. 14.
Minnesota 28, Northwestern 13.

M. A. C. opens Michigan's hockey
season this year, playing our informal
team this Wednesday at the coliseum.
More than 30 men have been trying
out for the team, among whom are
some who look to be of good calibre.
Coach Addison claims that our pros-
pects are good. The game starts at
7 o'clock and should prove a well con-
tested affair.
The team will hold its practices
every day this week betwen 5 and 6
o'clock.
Sigma Delta Chi To Hold Meetiig
Sigma Delta Chi, national profes-
sional journalistic fraternity, will meet
at 4 o'clock this afternoon at the Un-
ion to hear the report of the delegate
to the national convention, held re-
cently at Ames, Ia., and to discuss im-
portant measures relative to the activ-
ities of the organization the remainder
of the year.
City "Y" Board to Meet
All members of the executive board
of the City Y. M. C. A. will meet in
the city Chamber of Commerce for
luncheon next Monday afternoon. The
board will discuss a number of import-
ant measures which have been propos-
ed to them.

FACULTY NOTICE
Faculty members who have not
returned questionnaire ' blanks
to the fie editor of The Daily,
are reminded that these blanks
are desired at once.

f
li

e
i

1 t

-°-,

f

i J-HOP NOTICE
I I
I There will be a special meeting I
of the general J-Hop committee I
I at 4 o'clock Monday afternoon in I
I the Union. The meeting is of I
C great importance and all mem-
bers should attend. -1
r I

I NOTICE TO CAMPUS AND RE.
LIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS
In order to improve the gener-
al appearance of The Daily it
I seems desirable to discontinue
I the use of page one for display
I advertising. Accordingly, the
I front page ribbon, hitherto sold
only to campus and religious or-
I gani7ations, will be no longer
I available. heginning Feb. 14.
VERNON F. HILLERY,
Business Manager.

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