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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 08, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-01-08

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tAGU TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY RUNJJ&I, JBX45 1A

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every mornng except Monday during tke aliver-
sity year by the Bord in Control of Student Pubicatins.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Pre" is exclusively entitled to the u fort
republicaton of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwie
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as secd
class matter.
Suscription by carrier or mail,'3.5o.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phbones: Business, 96o; Editorial. 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daiy office.
" Unsigned c "mmunications will receive no consideration. o man-
uscript will be returned unless the writer incoses postage.
The D aiy des not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
pressed in the communicatons.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR .......... BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
Assistant Managing Editor.................Hugh W. Hitchcock
City Editor.......................... ...E. P. Lovejoy. Jr.
Night Editors-
R. Et. Adams M. B. Stahl
Edward Lambrecht Paul Watzel
G. r. Overton
Editorial Board Chairman.....................T. J. Whinery
assistants-
S. T Beach E. R. Meiss
L. A. Kern Leo Hershdorfer
Sunday Magazine Editor.............Thornton W. Sargent, Jr.
Exchange Editor.............................. George E. Sloan
Music Editor................................Sidney B. Coates
Sporting Editor................................ George Reindel
Women's Editor........................... Elizabeth Vickery
Humor Editor.............................. E R. Meiss
Assistant
Kingsley S. Andersson L. L. Fenwick B. H. Lee
Maurice Berman Dorothy G. Geltz Robert M. Loeb
Cecil R. Betron 1. B. Grundy J. E. Mack
Jack D. Bisco Sa~ybeth lleath Kathrine Montgomery
W. B. [iter Wiona A. Hibbard R. C. Moriarty
R. N. ByCrs Harry D. loey J. F. Pontius
A. D. Clark Agnes Holmquist Lilian Scher
Harry C. Clark H. E. Howlett R. B. Tarr
3P. Comstck Marion Kerr Virginia Tryon
RobertW . Cooper I. S. Kerr Dorothy Whipple
Evelyn J. Cougn M. A. Klaver L. L. Yost
John P. Dawson Victor W. Klein J. B. Young
. A. Donahue Marion Koch
W. F. Elliott George E. Lardner
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER ............. VERNON F. HILLERY
Advertising ........................F. M. Heath, A. J. Parker
Publication .............................. Nathan W. Robertson
Accounts .................................. John J. Hamels Jr.
Circulation................................. Herld C. Hunt
Assistants
Burr L. Robbins Richard Cutting H. Willis Hedbreder
W. Cooley James Prentiss W Kenneth Galbraith
L. Beaumont Parks Maurice Moule J. A. Dryer
Walter Scherer ai vin Goldring Richard Heideman
B~dw. Murane Tylertkevens PT. H. Wolfe
David Park Paul Bluin'
SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 1922
Night Editor-PAUL WATZEL
Assistant-L. J. Hershdorfer
Proofreaders-R. W. Cooper
C. R. Betron
FILL THE SEATS WITH ROOTERS
Tickets for basketball contests are selling well,
according to.information from the Athletic office.
this refutes the rumors of a student boycott, and it
shows the reasonableness of the campus when it is
appealed to in the right way. It is encouraging to
believe that the team will not lack backers when it
plays its big games on the home floor.
Nevertheless, there is still a goal to be reached,
for the tickets are to open to purchase by the gen-
eral public after January 10. Inasmuch as it is
necessary that loyal Michigan men occupy the seats
instead of mere outsiders, it is to be hoped that the
majority of these tickets can be sold to students be-
fore this date comes 'round.
Now that the indecision following a new situa-
tion has passed, it is to be expected that the student
body will no longer hesitate in taking over the re-
maining pasteboards. The campus realizes that the
team must have backers - and the campus will back
the team.
THAT MUSICAL MENU
Music hath always had charms, we are told, but
up to recent times no one has bothered about any-
thing other than its entertainment possibilities. In
this age of extreme efficiency, however, everything
must have a use or perish.

rew indeed are the people in this utilitarian age
who have observed that while all else was being
boiled down to a purpose music alone remained
without one. In fact the very abstractness of music
has been its chief source of charm, and listeners
have continued to enjoy it from generation to gen-
eration without quite discerning the cause for their
response.
That once famous popular song "I, Like Music
with My Meals" has appealed mightily tokthe great
majority of normal individuals who start the vic-
trola at lunch and dinner time. Restaurants charge
more for the privilege of an orchestral concert to,
drown out the clash of plates and the chatter of
dinner parties. And people pay the extra charge,
because they like it. Up to the last few days no one
cared much whether the musicians played "Every-
body's Doing It' 'or the "Ninth Symphony", as long
as it was music. Up to a few days ago the harmony
was useless except to afford pleasure to the eaters.
Gone are those times now. Indomitable efficiency
has stepped to the wheel.
To a London surgeon we are indebted for this
transition. HIhas afterwdueresearch, we trust,
been able to apply music to digestion, and suggests
the following menu program as an aid in abolishing
stomach troubles and nightmares. The menu is as
follows.:
Hors d'oeuvre: "The Blarney Stone", Engle-
man.
Soup: "Humoresque", Dvorak.
Fish: "Chanson Triste", Tschaikowsky.
Entree: "Spring Song", Mendelssohn.
Joint: "Berceuse Jocelyn", Goddard .

Game: "Valse des Fleurs", Tschaikowsky.
Sweet: F ragment from "Pathetic Symphony",
Tschaikowsky.
Savory : "Minuet and Tric", Sterndale-Bennett.
It is evident that the surgeon has put a great deal
of thought into the matter, and this fact together
with his international renown makes it rather dan-
gerous, or perhaps unwise, to disagree with him.
Nevertheless music appeals in different ways to dif-
ferent individuals. Therefore, after due delibera-
tion and consideration of the probable consequences
we are forced to offer a rival program which we are
sure is more compatible with the menu offered. It
follows:
Hors d'oeuvre: (Russian Caviar with French
Dressing) "War of 1812", Rachmaninoff.
Soup: No extra music needed.
Entree: (Roast Beef) "Song of the Tore.ador".
Baked Appl: Overture from "William Tell".
Sweet : Suite, "Woodland Sketches", Mac-
Dowell.
As alternatives in the Entress one might use:
Goulash: "Hungarian Rhapsody".
Hash: Medley.
Such is the menu-program as arranged up to
date. The "joint" of the surgeon's program has
been omitted because as far as can be learned it is
the place where one eats and not a course in the
meal.
As anyone can easily observe the application of
music to digestion has opened a field of unlimited
possibilities to that art. The London surgeon might
do well to start out by conferring his benefits upon
a billionaire dyspeptic wh is willing to swap a few
oil wells for an effective cure.
DOING THE EXTRAORDINARY
"Any ordinary man can on any ordinary day go
and do a task the favorable results of which may be
foreseen. The big thing is to go confidently to work
on a task the results of which nobody can possibly
foresee, a task so vague and improbable of defi-
nite results that small men hesitate." These words
attributed to Walter H. Page, former ambassador
to England, contain much logic and express an old
and established truth in a new manner. It is this
spirit which has been at the basis of every great
accomplishment in history.
Back in the eighteenth century when Napoleon
Bonaparte, a mere youth of slight physique with no
executive or administrative experience at the tine,
succeeded in overthrowing the existing government
and placing himself in power he performed such a
task as Mr. Page speaks of. The will to enter upon
similar undertakings resulted in Fulton inventing
the steam boat, Jefferson purchasing the Louisiana
territory contrary to the constitution, and Lord
Northcliffe in defiiance of the censor arousing Eng-
land to the necessity of effective preparation for a
long war. In fact if one were to analyze the lives
of the individuals in every line of endeavor whose
accomplishments have been great enough to enable
them to live in history or stand out above their fel-
lows in the present century he would almost invari-
ably find that they have been characterized by the
zeal and willingness to enter prepared and confident
upon a task which offers so many complexities that
it is impossible to determine what the results
will be.
The difference between a great man and a
mediocre one is oftentimes merely that the former
possesses the spirit to overcome obstacles the mag-
nimity of which force the latter to cringe.
Ie Telescope
Hot Repartee.
Mr. Vee Dee: Th' other day
When I was forced to plow my way
Across a puddle very great,
You gurgled, "Lady of the Lake".
You well remembered one Sir Walt.-
Which went to prove you quite well taught -,
But what about the other one
Who spread his cloak?
-Ain't w got fun?

N. B.-This answer to Mr. Vee Dee's remarks of
a few days ago concerning the "Lady of the Lake"
is very well put. In his behalf, however, it might
be said that the gallant Sir Walter Raleigh laid his
cloak for a monarch who was in position to furnish
him with another one, and besides, if our history
sticks with us, Queen Elizabeth wasn't wearing ga-
loshes on that occasion.
Songs of thc Immortals
A most unusual chap we know
Is William Henry South,
While others talk with flow'rs and music
He employs his mouth.
Behold! Our New President!
NEWS ITEM IN SEATTLE STAR: Dr. M. L.
Benton, President of the University of Michigan,
will speak at the College club here today.
A Terrible Pun
Dear Erm, I told my
History Prof. that
England and
Scotland carried on
Guerrilla warfare
And he said, "Sort of
Monkeying around, weren't
They ?" What brand do
You drink? tb dHenky Dink.
Famous Closing-Lines
"Just dropped in by accident," said the aviator as
his plane crashed through the roof into the midst
of a family gathering. ERM.

REDUCTIONS ON ALL
m.m A. AT -
=G RAHAM'S Both Stores
:UIIIIi11lIm ItImi t111 m1NI t11111 tl11111 imt11111 t111t11m1t11t it11til11 111t I 111 tlt 11 l11 111 1 t11 1 1 1E1110"

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars - 6:oo
a. M., 7:oo a. in., 8:oo a. in., 9:00 a. in. and
hourly to 9:05 P. in. o n a k o xa C r
aso>n Express Cars (local stops of Ann
Arbor), 9:47 a. m. and every two hours to
9:47 P. im.
Local Cars East Bound-5 :s san. 700 a.
m . and every two hours to 9:00 p. in., xi.oo
p in. To Ypsilanti only-ti:40 p. in., 12:25
a. in., i : i a. in.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:5o a. in., 2:44
p. M.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars:
8:47, 10:47, a. in., 12:47, 2.47, 4:47.
To Jackson and Lansing - Limited: 8:47
p. in.
1922 JANUARY 1922
S M T W T -F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16. 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 3o 31
NOTICE TO MEN
We do all kinds of high-class Ha#'
work at pre-war prices. Hats turned
inside out, with all new trimmings,
are as good as new.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792
Buy your class toques from Daily
advertisers.-Adv.
5.A

First officers were elected for Mich-
igan's Rifle club in December, 1914.
1 _

I

Exclusive designing
in
Afternoon and Evening Gowns
23o Nickels Arcade
PHONE 795 W
MRS BRACE VAN SCHOICK

I

Buy your class' toques from Daily
advertisers.-Adv.
ADRIAN-ANN ARBOR BUS
SCHEDULE EFFECTIVE OCT. so, g:
Rrad Down Centra lStandard Time
A.M. . Y.M. P.M. A&PMi
Daiiy Daily Daily Daily
7:30 1:30 Lv... Adrian ..Ar. 7:0o t2.43
8:0 2 :05 ... Tecumseh ... 6:2s 210
8:25 2125........Clinton ....,.6:og 11:50
9:15 3:15..... Saline5.....s-1.r
9:45 3°45 Ar. Ann Arbor LT. 4:45 0:30
a9_ 'r MP M A*PM
head Up
SINDAYS ANT) HOLIDAYS

3.30
4:05
4:a5
5-.45
P.M.

Lv... Adrian . .Ar.
...Tecumseh ..
..... Clinton .....
.Saline .
Ar. Ann Arbor LT.

3:00
8:05
6:45
P.M.

CLEARANCE SALE'
25$Reduction

I

-ON-

ALL FURNISHINGS

'f . :'. '.

4I

-V
Sunday-Tuesday
RUBYE
DeREMER
America's Most
Beautiful Woman
- IN-
"LUXURY5

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ALL STRIPED TIES
At $1.00
ARTHUR F. MARQUARDT
608 EAST LIBERTY STREET

-0

hlIN

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.-a fact:

DRY CLEANING
GARMENTS IN
WE USE BENZOL

IS WASHING Y O U R
GASOLINE OR BENZOL
EXCLUSIVELY

Ann Arbor's Only Cleaners NOT Using GASOLINE

Unlucky
Phone 13 for Spots

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REDUCTF7ION

ON OUR ENTIRE STOCK OF
FOOTWEAR

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and
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DISTINCTION

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