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December 06, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-12-06

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'HE MICHIGAN DAILY

0! 4r ir41gait DattIR
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER Q THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICIRGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
city year by the Board in Contra, of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.

Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
ass matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail,dy3. yd.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Busineis, ,960; Editorial, 2414. ________

Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
are not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
:retion of the Lditor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
signed communications will receive no consideration. IWO man-
ript will be returned unless .the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse*the sentiments ex-
sed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414

MANAGING EDITOR ....... BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
Assistant Managin'g Editor.................Hugh W. Hitchcock
City Editor..............................E. P. Lovejoy, Jr.
Night Editors-
R E Adams G. P. Overton
Edward Lambrecht M: B.Stahl
Hugnston McBain Paul Watzel
Editorial BoardChairman......................T. J. Whinery
istanT. Beach E. R. Meiss
S. A. Beach Leo Tlershdorfer
Sunday MagazinerEditor.............Thornton W. Sargent, Jr.
Exchange Editor............................George E. Sloan
Music Editor.................................Sidney B. Coates
Sporting Edit')r............ .................. George Reinider
Women's Editor..........................Elizabeth Vickery
Humor Editor................................ R. Meiss
Assistants
R. N. Byers L. L. Fenwick B.H. Lee
W. B. -Butler H. B. Grundy J E. Mack
A. D. Clark Agnes Holmquist Kathrine Montgomery
Harry C. Clark H. E. Howlett R. C. Moriarity
t P. Comstock Marion Kerr R. B. Tarr
ohn P. Dawson L. S. Kerr Virginia Tryon
. A. Donahue M. A. Klaver Dorothy Whipple
W. F. Elliott Marion Koch I,.L. Yost

agership their senior year, and through the knowl-
edge that the best of them will surely receive definite
recognition of some ,kind.
With football crowds growing more numerous
each year, and accordingly, team-work among
cheer leaders becoming more and more necessary,
the problem of proper selection in this field bids fair
to present a more difficult aspect in the future than
it has in the past. A scheme whereby the head of
the squad will be given the rank of a manager,
whereby those on the squad will be given awards, -
and an appropriation which will make it unneces-
sary for men to furnish their own uniforms, would
undoubtedly solve this problem and make for a
more effective cheerleading system, and proportion-
ately better cheering. Now, before things have
dragged along any more, is the time for the Student
council or some other qualified campus organization
to take some definite action on the matter.
RELIGIOUS DISCUSSION GROUPS
Nearly everybody has doubtless heard the story
of the man who knew so little about literature that
he thought Anatole France was a geographical lo-
cation. Probably few college students would be the
butt of such a sally, yet how many of them could be
tripped up just as easily by some reference to the
Bible.
Looking at it merely from a common sense view-
point, students attending the University ought to
know something about the Bible. Most of us would
hardly think of going through college without gain-
ing at least a smattering of information on "Para-
dise Lost", "Macbeth", and other English classics.
Yet in the opinion of the best literary authorifies the
Bible contains more philosophy, simpler expressed
and more readily applied, and has more practical
value than any other work in the English language.
And a little knowledge will as a rule go a long way.
There are --various methods of securing this
knowledge. - The S. C. A. plan of fraternity dis-
cussion groups for religious history and problems
seems to be a most profitable and beneficial way of
so doing. The discussions are not to be conducted
as Sunday school classes, but rather present an op-
portunity for college men to become more intimately
acquainted with members of the faculty through an
exchange of ideas outside of,,as well as within, the
realm of religion. The suggestion has already been
favorably received by some fraternities and should
not die out for lack of further support.
The Opera is the one place where the worst
chorus girls get away the best.
"Punity League on the Rocks. Girl to Blame"
reads metropolitan head What an awful thing to
be blamed for 1

GRAHAM' S
lioth ,fnds of the Diagonal Walk

Narcissus Bulbs with Bowls at

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6.o5 a.
M., 7:05 a. m., 8:io a. m. and hourly to 9:10
tr. m.
Jackson Express Carr (local stops of Ann
\rbor), 9:48 a. mn. and every two hours to
,:48 p. mn.
Local Cars East Bound-5:55 a.m, 7: o a.
n. and every two hours to 9:oo p. in., z 1:oo
. m. To Ypsilanti only-itz:4o p. M., 12.25
nm., I:15 a. M.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:50 a. M., 2:40 p.
nl.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars:
:48, 10:43 a. Mn., 1x:48, 2:48, 4:48.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited: 8:48
P. m.
1921 DECEMBER 1921
S M T W F S3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30 31
NOTICE TO MEN
We do all kinds of high-class Hat
work at pre-war prices. Hats turned
aside out, with all new trimmings,,
are as good as new.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PA CKA 11) STREET
T"mh"one 1792

Y

THE WILLIAM FOX WONDER PICTURE
"Over the Hill"

ONE SOLID YEAR IN NEW YORK
7 STRAIGHT WEEKS IN DETROIT

THERE MUST BE A REASON

WVERTH

I

STARTS.
SUNDAY,
DEC. 11TH

7-

-.

a. w N rv

J: B. Young

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER.............VERNON F. HILLERY
Advertising......................F. M. Heath,A. J.Parker
rPublication............................ Nathan W. Robertson
Accounts.............................John J- Hamel, Jr.
Circulation............................... Herold C. Hunt
Assistants
Burr L. Robbins Richard Cutting H. Willis Heldbreder
W. Cooley James Prentiss W. Kenneth Galbraith
L.: Beau ont Parks Maurice Moule J. A. Dryer
Walter Schereraik i n Goldring Richard Ieidemann
9dw. Murane Tyler Stevens T. H, Wolfe
David Park Paul Blum
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1921
Night Eidtor-M. B. STAHL
Assistant-Robert Tarr
Proofreaders-William Smith
J. F. Pontius
There will be a meeting of the entire editorial
staff and all tryouts at 5 o'clock this afternoon.
GODSPEED
Tonight "Make It for Two", the Sixteenth An-
nual Michigan Union Opera, performs its openi1g
bow before the public at the Whitney theater. The
idea of the show itself, - the playing of men in all
the roles of a student written scenario, - is noth-
ing new to the University body.
"Make It for Two", nevertheless, marks an epoch
in the advancement of Union dramatics. The deci-
sion to invade new territory in outside -states with
the Michigan show has necessarily altered the pro-
duction to a great extent. The first change was the
transferring of the time of its performance from
the week of Spring Recess, in which it has formerly
played, to the fortnight allowed by the Christmas
holidays. This required a more intensive training
and greater concentration of effort for the produc-
tion of 'a finished-entertainment within a more lim--
ited period of time.
A show which has never before in Michigan dra-
matics been approached in the elaborateness of its
costumes and the originality of its dances was also
necessitated by this decision. An immense expendi-
ture of money and effort have fitted this year's
opera for Michigan's first dramatic venture into ter-
ritory outside the state. The success of this produc-
tion means a great deal to the fame of the Univer-
sity, .as well as to the operas of the years to come.
It is for these reasons, that this year more than
ever, the student body is extending its heartiest wish
for success to the Sixteenth Michigan Union Opera,
and bidding it Godspeed on the day of its opening
performance.
ORGANIZE IT NOW
With the football season over and the greatest
need for cheer leaders past for the time being, we
are inclined to forget difficulties that have arisen in
the past with regard to the lack of a cheer leading
system at Michigan. We forget that at present but
one cheer leader holds a place of confidence among
Michigan rooters, and he will leave the University
at the next Commencement. But one established
cheerleader out of a student body of 8,ooo seems al-
most ludicrous. Michigan has potential pep-induc-
ers, pnty of them, but the present system, or lack
of system, is such that it does not urge men to com-
pete for the job. There is a plausible and just way
in which the hit-or-miss fashion of selecting a cheer-
leader could be remedied.
Cheer leading should be as much a campus ac-
tivity as any other form of student work. A big
responsibility is in the hands of the one who han-
dles the crowds, and consequently his caliber and
personality should be of the best that the Univer-
sity has to offer. Ohio State and certain other uni-
versities of the Middle West .have already inaugur-
ated organized systems, whereby men are encour-
aged to offer their services in this activity through
the hope of a possible award in the form of a man-

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h.

IPAL -

I,-. . -- _

The Telescope

i

9

.b0 o

dr

Music and Math
Evidently inspired by the article concerning music
as a help to the solution of. problems in mathe-
matics,printed in the Sunday Magazine of The
Daily, December 4, the following found its way into
the contribution box of the Telescope:
"Music hath charms," so it is oft expressed,
"To solve the problems of the savage breast."
And "Math hath charms," at least the teachers say,
"To cheer our souls and drive dull care away."
Now Math and Music hand in hand advance;
I learned my Horner's Method at a dance;
Let my instructor pant through complex fractions,
I learn my music best 'mid Math's distractions
A Bandleader would lend to Math a zest;
My fancy pictures me among the rest
Watching his baton as he labors with 'em:
"Get it? Come on now, gang ! A LOG-A-
RITHUM". Pi-rex.
A Terrible Deed
The Chicago Tribune's "Inquiring Reporter"
prints the following question, "What disposition
should be made of morons ?"
The answer of a young woman interviewed starts
out, "Anyone who even attempts to commit such a
wrong should be hanged or shot."
Quoth Eppie Taif :
Our roommate's uncle,"
Rich as Croesus,
Lost his temper,
Flew to pieces.
Ec Studes! Attention!
It might be interesting to note that Noah was
possibly' the greatest business man who ever lived.
He came to the front with a splash by floating a
company when the rest of the world was in liquida-
tion. --Kanukk Harry.
Needham: What pretty lips you have.
Mahdeen: Y-e-s.
Needham: But I would be willing to put mine
up against them anyday. - Ermine.
Yes, Yes, Go On
Dear Erm:
Wouldn't you hate to be the rear license on an
automobile and always be a back number?
Yours, - Boot Black.
Famous Closing Lines
"The last down," she said as she completed pluck-
ing the goose. ERM.

c-

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