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December 06, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-12-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

E WEATHER
TDY AND COLDER
TODAY

I

r

Aw Aeall
Ask
AAMWW I

:43 aAIVl

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXXII. NO. 61 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1921 PRICE FIVE CE

JAPAN WAIVES
ALL RIGHTS IN
SHANTUNG AFFAI
PRESENT REGIME OF PROVINCE
TO BE PART OF CHINESE
CUSTOMS SYSTEM
ADMIRAL KATO DENIES,
CHARGE OF B A'RGAINING
Declares Press Reports Contrary to
Fact and Give Wrong Impression
of Honest Endeavor
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Dec. 5. -Japan agreed
to waive all her preferential rights in
Shantung when the negotiations be-
tween Japan and China looking to a
settlement of the dispute over the
Kaio Chou affair were resumed today.
Resume Discussion Tomorrow
Agreement was also reached for the
present regime of the province to be
an integral part of tie Chinese cus-
toms system. The Japanese, however,
woldd be permited to communicate
with the inspector general in the Ja-
panese language The conversation
will be continued tomorow afternoon
when the question of public proper-
ties will be taken up.
Emphatic denial that Japan is play-
ing "what is called a bargaining gamQ"
In Washington was made tonight by
Admiral Baron Kato, acting .head of
the Japanese delegation. He attribut-
ed delays to the cable situation, add-
ing that the issues involved could not
be decided without "the fullest knowl-
edge and consideration of the Japan-
ese government". "
"Will Agiee"
Baron Kato said he was convinced
the conference should be able to agree
on an adjustment "fair to all par-
ties" and added that he and his col-
leagues "would spare no effort to-
ward the earliest possible .conclusion
consistent with wisdom and fore-
sight."
Newspaper reports that Japan was
playing a bargaining game, he said,
were "contrary to the facts" and are
to be regretted, since they link up an
"unworthy' motive" in the popular
mind with the "honest endeavors for
the betterment and progress of man-
kind".
DISCU SSCONERENCE.
AT MEETING TONIGHT
EXTEMPORANEOUS S P EA KE RS
GET ASSIGNMENTS THIS
AFTERNOON
Details of the Armament conference
will be the subject for discussion in
the extemporaneous speaking contest
to be held at 8 o'clock tonight in
Sarah Caswell Angell hall under the
direction of the department of ora-
tory.
The speakers chosen 'for the final
contest are: F. R. Allaben, '23, K. F.
Clardy, '24, D. B. Fredericks, '24, J.'
B. Glasgow, '43, C. E. Hodgman, '24,
Vera C. Kaden, '24, F. R. Nyberg, '23,
F. J. Ortman, '23. Alternates are: Paul
T. Kilborn, '23, and F. L. Robinson,
'22.
Members of the contest will go to
room 302 Mason hall at 5 o'clock this

afternoon and will be assigned td
their particular phase of the sub-
ject. They will have from 5 o'clock
until 8 to prepare the speeches, which
will be eight minutes in length. The
award for the best speech will be a
silver loving cup, for the second best
a book, and honorable mention will be{
given the third best. Judges are to be
members of Delta Sigma Rho, honor-
ary debating society.
INDIVIDUAL ALUMNI DISCUSS
DORMITORIES FOR THE MEN
Individual alumni of the University,
mostly of Detroit, are discussing the
position of building dormitories on the
campus for men. This undertaking is
one entirely of private initiative on
the part of alumni interested in see-
ing dormitories installed on the cam-
pus, the University having no connec-
tion with the proposition except that
it would exercise authority as to reg-
ulations for the dormitories..

23E AND '25 PAY
CLASS DUES TODAY
Junior engineers and freshman lits
will have booths located on the cam-
pus today for the final collection of
class dues.
Junior engineers will have,tables
distributed in all parts of the Engi-
neering building and collections will
be made during the entire day. Class
officers are anxious that all fees be
paid at this time.
Freshman lit dues may be paid to-
day and tomorrow at the table in
,University hall opposite the regis-
trar's office. Those who fail to pay
will not be permitted to attend or par-
ticipate in any of the class functions.-
the first of which will be held shortly
after Christmas.tt
BASKETBALL SEATS
zO0ON SALETODAY
Only One Group May Be Purchased
Before Friday, When Remainder
Goes on Sale
OFFICIALS ASSERT EXTRA
COST OF TICKETS FAIR
Tickets for the season's basketball
games will be placed on sale at 9
o'clock today at the Athletic associa-
tion office In the Press building. Stu-
dents may buy only one of the groups
until Friday of this week, when the
remaining tickets will be placed on
sale. After that time a student may
purchase both of the groups, or may,
if he has purchased one group, buy his
second preference.
Attention is called to the factnthat
these tickets are on sale only to stu-
dens of he University, and in order
that others may notbuy, the student
will be required to show hs athletic
book and submit coupon 24.
Ticket Charge Fair
The fairness of the charge for tick-
ets to the basketball contests was
again pointed out yeterday, when it
was declared that the original action
of the Regents providing for athletic
coupon books in 1912 made these
books admission to events on Ferry
field only. Since the inauguration of
basketball in 1917, there has been
more and more Interest shown every
year, and the problem of accommo-
dating those who wanted to attend the
games became greater.
At first all were admitted to the
events In the gymnasium in spite of
the fact that the coupon books were
originally authorized only as admis-
sion for out-of-dor events. A plan
was tried out whereby the student re-
ceived two basketball tickets. This
worked fairly well, but even then all
those who wanted could not be ac-
commodated.
I The Groups
Two groups of tickets are available
today, each group admitting the pur-
chaser tq six games, and selling for
$2. Group A includes the following
games: Carnegie Technical Institute,
Dec. 30; M. A. C., Jan. 6; OhioState,
fan. 9; Indiana, Feb. 20; and Illi-
noIs, Feb. 2. The indoor track meet
with Chicago, Feb. 2, is also in-.
luded.
Group B is composed of the follow-
ing contests: Western State Normal,
Dec. 9; Carnegie Technical Institute,
Dec. 31; Chicago, Jan. 10; Wisconsin
Feb.: 18; Iowa, March 4; and North-
western, March 6.
ENGLISH MUFFIN TEA HOUSE
TO OPEN THIS AFTERNOON

As an attraction for their formal
opening of the English Muffin Tea
house this afternoon, Miss Grace F.
Bailey and Mrs. Lillian D. Norton have
announced that Miss Marvel Garnsey,
haivist, of Adrian, will be present as
entertainer for the occasion.
The new establishment, which is to
occupy the old Vaughan place, at 221
South State street, will hold open
house from 4 to 6 o'clock this after-
noon, in order to introduce itself to
the public.
Burton Speaks to High School
President Marion L. Burton will
speak this morning before the mem-
bers of the Ann Arbor high school.
In 1909 a committee of student ad-
visers was organized to coach athletes
who were deficient in their duties.
The faculty passed a resolution pro-
hibiting "keg parties" in 1908.

GOEBL CHOICE OF
F0OTBAL"M" MEN
AS 1922 CAPTAIN

HAS STARRED FOR TWO YEARS
RIGHT END-PLAYING IN
EVERY GAME

AT

CAME TO VARSITY FROM
GRAND RAPIDS CEN FRAL
In Addition to Grid Duties, New Wol-
verne Leader is Brilliant
Student
Paul G. Goebel, '23E, is Michigan's
1922 football captain. His election
took place at a meeting of the foot-
ball team held yesterday. Coming to
Michigan in 1919 after a brilliant grid-
iron career at Grand Rapids Central
high school, where he played during
his entire course at end and center,
Goebel tried out for the yearling team
and had no difficulty in landing a per-

COMMENCE SALE OF
RAILROAD TICKETS
Agents at both the Michigan Cen-
tral and Ann Arbor stations ask that
students who are going home for the
holidays on either of these lines buy
their tickets and make Pullman res-
ervations as soon as possible so as to
prevent over-crowding of trains at the
busy time. Last year at vacation time
some, trains leaving here were so
crowded that it was necessary for
many to stand for considerable dis-
tances. "Quite a number of students
have already bought their tickets but
those who have not yet done so
should attend to it very soon in order
that we may give first class service
to our patrons by knowing how large
a number to provide for," said the
Michigan Central agent yesterday aft-
ernoon.
ED'UCATORS MEET,
HERE THIS WEEK

"MAKE IT FOR TWO" PREMIERE AT
WHITNEY TONIGHT OPENS LOCAL
RUN OF SIXTEENTH UNION OPER

Delegates from
Valley States
Twelfth

Many Mississippi
to Assemble for
Conference

ADDRESS BY PRES. BURTON
INCLUDED ON PROGRAM
Manual arts educators of the Mis-
sissippi Valley states will hold their
twelfth annual conference here
Thursday, Friday, and Saturday of this
week. The program will include men
prominent in educational circles in
Ohio, Indiana, Minnesota, Illinois..and
Michigan.
Myers Arranges Program
Ann Arbor speakers will include
President Marion L. Burton, Prof.
George -Myers, and Dean A. S. Whit-
ney. Prof. George Myers will have
charge of the program. The chair-
man of the conference is William T.
Bawden, assistant to the commission-
er of the United States bureau of edu,
cation.
Thursday's program will consist of
a conference at the Union at 10
o'clock, addressed by H. W. Schmidt,
of Madison, Wis., and luncheon at
12:15 o'clock at the Union, which will
be addressed by President Marion L.
Burton and Dean A. S. Whitney. Fol-
lowing the juncheon will be a confer-
ence at 2 o'clock and another at 7:30.
Three Sessions Friday
Friday the conferences will be held
at 9:30, 2:30, and 7:30 o'clock, and
will be addressed by Fred C. Whit-
comb, of Oxford, Ohio; I. S. Griffith, of
Madison, Wis., and A. H. Edgerton,
Bloomington, Indiana.'
Saturday the concluding conference
will be held, ending with the business
session and a summary of the delib-
erations of the conference by Mr.
Charles A. Bennett.

CAPTAIN-ELECT GOEBEL
manent position at end on the first
string eleven.
The next year, 1920, he was the sen-
sation of the Varsity season, playing
every game at the end position in a
way that drew favorable comment
throughout the Middle West. His work
in the Illinois game was particularly
spectacular, but in every contest he
was one of the shining lights of the
Wolverin, eleven.
(Continued on Page Four)

COMMITTEEMEN RESIGN
Due to the discussion and ill
feeling that has been caused by
the recent J-Ejop election, and in
order to promote harmony in the
best interests of the junior lit-
erary class, we, the understigned,
voluntarily withdraw .from. the
offices to which we have been
elected.
ROBERT V. RICE,
Chairman,
. JAMES W. HUME,
Committeeman.I
SUBSCRIPTION CAMPIGN
FOR11ALUMNUS ANNOUNCED
STUDENTS GIVEN OPPORTUNITY
/10 EARN MONEY.DURING
CHRISTMAS VACATION
Wilfred B. Shaw, '04, editor of the
Michigan Alumnus, is laying plans
for a campaign for subscriptions to
the Alumnus to take place during the
Christmas holidays. Mr. Shaw intends
to secure students who will be re-
turning home for vacation to do the
work for which they will be paid a
commission for each subscription
taken.
At the present time the circulation of
the Alumnus is 7,500 copies per week,
but due to the'increased cost of the
publication since it has been made a
weekly it has become necessary to in-
crease the circulation by at least 1,500
copies. This is tire first year that the
Alumnus has been published once a
week, formerly having been a month-
ly, and according to letters received
at the Alumnus office the change has
proved popular with alumni all over
the world.
Mr. Shaw is desirous of seeing at
once at his office in Alumni Memorial
hall any students who would be inter-
ested in campaigning for the Alumnus
and incidentally earning some money
during the coming vacation.
CONGRESS AECONYLNS
FOR LONG SESSION
HARDING TO DELIVER MSAGE
AT 12:30 O'CLOCK
TODAY
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Dec. .-Congress re-
assembled today with the usual formal
ceremony of a new session and with
its legislative course fairly well shap-
ed. The opening program was rou-
tine, however, and was viewed by
smaller crowds than customary. In-
terest in general was subordinated to
President Harding's address which
will be delivered at a joint session at1
12:30 o'clock tomorrow. His recom-
mendations are expected to deal prin-
cipally with tariff revision, govern-
mental 'economy, and development of
the federal budget system.
Unusual interest in the Persident's
appearance was manifested in view of
the assured attendance of.gpe'ctators,
of delegates, and attaches to the arm-
ament limitation conference.' Admis-
sion to the house chamber is to be by
special card.
The President today devoted himself
to work on the message, denying him-
self to all visitors.

Michiganensian Tryouts Wanted
Sophomores wishing to try out for
the editorial staff of the Michiganen-
sian report at the Michiganensian of-
fice, Press building, between 3 and 4
o'clock this afternoon.
Darnton, '23, Goes to Baltimore Sun
Byron F. Darnton, ex-'23, who has
been employed on the Port Huron
Times-Herald, has accepted a position
on the Baltimore Sun. Darnton work-
ed on The Daily last year.
In 1891 the sophomore class carried
cane.

MONTHS OF WO" CULMINATED
WITH RISE OF CURTAIN
AT 8:
SONGS MAY PROVE
OF LASTING MERIT
Costumes, Scenery and Music Said to
Surpass All Previous
Productions
Cast and chorus of the sixteenth an-
nual Union opera, "Make It for Two",
are ready for the premiere at 8:15
o'clock tonight at the Whitney thea
ter after more than two months of
continuous rehearsal under the super-
vision of E. Mortimer Shuter, di-
rector.
Final Touches Added
Costumes and complete stage sets
for the production were in Ann Arbor
Saturday in readiness for the per-
formance tonight and all of the dances
and songs were practically in their
final form by the end of last week.
Stage committees, property men, and
make-up artists have all been practic-
ing their duties in the show for some
time, and all indications are that
"Make It for Two" will be played
without even the minor hitches that
usually attend a first night perform-
ance.
; The book for this year's opera was
written, by Leo Niedzielski, '24, and is
divided into two acts. The first has
stage sets representing a modern
drawing room, in the home of a "nou-
veau riche" family on Long Island,
The most brilliant effects of the show
are said to come toward the end of
this act, with elaborate costumes and
carefully worked out scenery, done by
Carl Bromel, of Detroit.
B o;nel Paints Scenery
The scene of the second act, whose
stage sets were also do'e by Bromel,
is the king's courtyard on the Island
of Nowhere, off the coast of Algeria.
Futuristic effects are particularly
sought for and the Oriental atmos-
phere wil be enhanced by two Ha-
waiian students in costume, splaying
ukeles and Hawaiian guitars.
The music and lyrics for the show
were written by Forman C. Brown,
'22, and are declared by the directors
of the opera to be as catchy as those
of any previous Union production.
"The operas of recent years have been
singularly lacking in songs of lasting
merit," said Mr. Shuter yesterday, "but
at least two, "My Garden of Girls" and
"Girls of the Season", in this year's
show, should be kept on the permanent
list of Michigan favorites."
Friday Is Formal Night
Friday night, in accordance with the
custom of the opera, will be formal
night. The Union does no't prescribe
the type of attire to be worn at that
performance, but the practice for sev-
eral years has been for large numbers
to appear in evening clothes on Friday
night.
The orchestra for "Make It for
Two", which will this year be-of the
regular musical comedy type, is under
the direction of Kemp Keena, '20. It
has been practicing for a number of
weeks and is now declared to be ready
for the opening chorus of Athe 1922
performance tonight,
News of the Day
IN BRIEF
Paris, Dec. 5.-Germany will prob-
ably be granted a three years' delay in
her cash- indemnity payment, the As-

sociated Press is informed from the
most reliable sources. Negotiations
are now going on between the repara-
tion officials of France and Great Brit-
ain, and the responsible officials of
both countries virtually agree that
Germany must be given a breathing
spell.
London, .Dec. 5. - Premier Lloyd
George is making a determined elev-
enth hour attempt to save what ap-
pears to be a hopeless situation. After
a full cabinet meeting today the prem-
ier summoned the Irish delegates to
meet the Irish committee of the cab-
4.. ,'

Ma terly Reserve In All Phases
Harks Friedman Concert Last Night

(By Sidney B. Coates)
Unassuming, reserved, with face and
body quiet, sat Ignaz Friedman before
the big grand piano last night In Hill
auditorium. Then with that same re-
served manner he began his render-
ing of the allegro and rondo-allegret-
to movements of Beethoven's Sonata,
Opus 90. He played with an absolute
control that caught and held his au-
dience.
Had Perfect Control
Every phrase was carefully worked
out and eve'ry mark of expression pul-
sating and distinct, but still 'reserved.
Ignaz Friedman knew exactly what
he wanted and he knew how to pro-
duce it. Then with his arms, wrists
and fingers bringing forth the music
with the keenness of ice and the
warmth of fire, he launched into the
Bach-Busoni "Chacomne" and the au-
dience had taken the first step in Mr.
Friedman's program.
His interpretation of the Chopin'
group was perhaps the best liked, es-
pecially that of the first etude in Opus
25, which brought forth such /enthu-
siasm that Mr. Friedman repeated it.
This number with the Ballade, Opus
42, and Vaise, in C sharp minor, were
the most popular of the Chopin group.
In the last section of the program
came four of his own compositions,
full of an urging restlessnes and re-
quiring the utmost skill in execu-
tion.

Final Numbers Are Climax
He finished with the "Tannhauser"
overture by Wagner-Liszt, playing it
in such a way as to make the climax
of the whole evening; but he played
a combination, .almost impossible to
reconcile. Wagner's warm humanness
and Liszt's eccentricities some way do
not seem to harmonize, and while the
number is brilliant and calls for all
the skill of a great artisbt, its message
seems obscure.
PROFESSORS WHITE, BADGER
ATTENDING A. I. C. E. MEETING
Profs. A. H. White and W. L. Badger,
of the chemistry department, are at-
tending the meeting of the American
Institute of Chemical Engineers which
meets in Baltimore, Md., Dec. 6 to 9,
at which both will speak. Professor
White appears on the program Dec.
6 with one of a symposium of pa-
pers. on chemical engineering and na-
tional defense entitled "Fertilizers and
Explosives". Professor Badger speaks
Dec. 6 on "Regenerative Evaporation".
Professor White stopped in Wash-
ington yesterday to see about research
problems which are being carried out
here in connection with the depart-
ment of engineering research and the
government.
The University clock, during two
months of 1891, varied only seven sec-
onds.

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