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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 03, 1921 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-12-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SWAIN

HOMOEOPATHIC STAFF
MEN PROTEST MERGER!

Amateur Finishing

Lantern Slides

GROUPS

C

RESENT "PAINLESS DEATH"
SCHOOL BY PROPOSED
CO3BINE

OF,

Daylight or Flashlight
Indoors or Outside
713 E. University Ave.

Why Grumble

about your board and wish you had

"something good to

eat."

GO TO THE SANQUIST INN

ONLY ONE BLOCK OFF CAMPUS
You'll be Satisfied

FIRST TABLE PLACES

615 CHURCH ST.

K ._.._ . . . _..
I - - -

Why Do We Offer You
EATOIN'S
IGOHLAND
LINEN
TPHERE is a very good reason
why we offer this paper in pref-
erence to others. YOU are the
chief reason. We offer it knowing
that it is of the quality YOU will
like-because it reflects the taste in
style of envelopes and choice of tints
YOU would approve, and last be-
cause it is a paper that is YOU to
your friends.
When you are passing our way;
come in and see some of the new
tints and envelope shapes.
FOR SALE BY
0. D. MORRILL
17 NICKELS ARCADE

. ;
'
", *
y... eer'f k:

Members of the faculty of the
Homoeopathic Medical school have
expressed themselves as being largely
of the same -pinion as Dean Hins-
dale, when questioned as to the pro-
posed amalgamation of the two medi-
cal schools. Most of them protest
against a so-called "painless death,"
and would prefer immediate action to
do away with the Homoeopathic school
if its proper maintenance cannot be
Justified.
Enrollment Growing
They point to the fact that about
twenty homoeopathic medical schools
and hospitals throughout the country
have been closed down within the last
five years, and believe that their posi-
tion would' be anything but comfort-
able should the proposed merger go
through. They point also to the fact
that their enrollment is growing, and
will continue to grow if the facilities
for handling the students are provid-
ed, incidentally showing by referring
to state board examinations that the
average grades of the homoeopathic
students compare favorably with those
of the other school.
"Watchful 'Waiting"
It is probable, however, that memb-
ers of the faculty of the homoeopathic
school will have little to do with the
meeting of the Board of Regents Dec.
9, as the state boards will put up all
the arguments in behalf of the homoe-
opaths. It is believed that the state
boards of homoeopaths have plenty of
material to present to substantiate
their claims, but nothing remains for
the greater part of those concerned
but a policy of "watchful waiting"
until after the meeting December 9th.
BISHOP INSPIRES
VESPERS AUDIENCE
"Good will on earth" wasthe sub-
Ject of the inspiring talk given by
Bishop Remington Wednesday after-
noon at the Y. W. C. A. vesper services.
"It is the duty of every college man
and woman," said Bishop Remington,
"to create in the present world of
strife a new attitude of life."
Our attitude should be one of re-
turning good for evil. This was the
principle, Bishop Remington pointed
out, which the United States so thor-
oughly lived up to after the Box-
er rebellion when she asked as her
only indemnity for the lives of her
missionaries, that Chinese boys and
girls be sent to this country to be
educated.-
Education, acocrding to Bishop
Remington is the unlocking of the
doors of our beings to the best that is
in the people about us, our knowledge,
and the entire environment in which
we live; if we are, open-minded and
open-hearted, we will necessarily
spread good will.
Story Telling
Mrethods Taught
By New Course
Conceived in the belief that the
handling of children in schoolrooms
and on playgrounds demands some-
thing deeper in the way of prepara-
tion than a knowledge of spelling and
arithmetic and general teaching meth-
ods, the idea of a course in story tell-
ing was born several years ago in the
mind of Prof. Ray K. Immel, of the
oratorical department, and was put
into practice this year with highly
satisfactory results.
Studies Practical Methods
The calls which has 24 members,
may be elected only by special per-
mission. It Is intended primarily for

those who are preparing for work as
playground superintendents, primary
teachers, and children's attendants in
libraries. The enrollment is conse-
quently almost exclusively made up
of women students, although men may
also be enrolled.
The purpose of the course is to
teach the practical as well as the
theoretical side of story telling. Some
study of child psychology is made, and

the fundamental mechanics of telling
a story are taught. Members of the
class do a considerable amount of ex-
tension work.
Class Is Growing Rapidly
"The class has great possibilities,"
said Professor Immel. "Its broad
purpose is to develop in the coming
generation of parents and others who
have to do with the care of children
a real facility for handling them in
the best possible manner, and also to
enable such individuals to impart to
the children under their care a real
knowledge of the standard folk stor-
ies of all time."
The class in this course has grown
so rapidly since its inception that now
the limitation of the number who may
enroll; or perhaps the formation of
another section is being seriously con-
sidered.
Have you sent in your scenario for
the University movie yeti

I

Special Bargains
IN SUITS-$32.00
With Extra Pants-$38.50
Polo Shirts
$2.00
College Stripe
Ties
$1.00
Bow Ties
75c

Sheeplined Co
$15.00-$17.00-$18
Suede Molesi
$18.00
Ulsterette Co-
$20.00
Wool Vest
$4.00
Wool Hose
75c to $1.50

16

Iiow

REMOVE THE DANGER
Step into either of our offices and look over our
--- Safety Deposit Vault Equipment
You will feel at ease knowing your valuables are
safely deposited in your individual box behind
those massive doors

"BARGAINS!" "BARGAINS!"

FARMERS & MECHANICS BANI
101-105 South Main Street. 880 South State
(Nickels Arc

E. J. SCHNEIDER'
1119 SOUTH UNIVERSITY AVE.

I.

THE COST IS NOMINAL

d.

DSuents

Read

Thi

THE MANAGEMENT OF THE

Michigan
MILLIONS OF
PEOPLE CAN
WRITE STORIES
AND
PHOTOPLAYS
AND
DON'T KNOW IT
TRY NOW
$75.00

Daily

Scenario

Con

HAS DECIDED TO EXTEND
THE TIME ONE MORE WEEK

REMEMBER
THIS PICTUR
WILL BE PR(
DUCED RICH

CONTEST

a liwi
IN ANN

A

WILL POSITIVELY CLOSE
SATURDAY, DEC. 10
AT 6 O'CLOCK

START WRI
YOUR STO
TODAY

*

IN COLD given as Priz

DON'T LET THIS OPPORTUNITY PASS
Enter with the Michigan Spirit, "To Win!"

RULES OF CONTEST
1. All manuscripts must be typewritten on white
8/2 x 11 inch paper. Original copies, not carbons,
must be submitted.
2. Manuscripts should be written as short as pos-
sible but fully explaining situations and detail of
story.-
3. The writer's name and address must be on the
upper left hand corner of the first page of the man-
uscript.
4. Manuscripts not accepted will be returned only
if self-addressed and stamped envelopes are en-
closed.
5. Manuscripts will be judged by competent
judges picked by The Daily and the producers.
6. Two prizes will be awarded, the first of $50
and the second of $25.
7. Manuscripts should \be addressed to The Daily
in care of the scenario editor.
8. The contest closes at 6 o'clock Saturday night,
Dec. 10, 1921.

A FEW SUGGESTIONS
1. A scenario is the description of the action
a story in its proper order, but not necessarily
vided into scenes of giving the detailed action.
2. Don't forget that the heart and soul of t
scenario is its story. That is the great thing, I
essential thing, and the all important thing ab(
the scenario. If the story is a fascinating thing
heart-interest, clean romance, adventure or myste
then your scenaro Is good at heart.,
3. Stories of a dramatic type are desired. Drai
makes a more definite appeal and is easier to pt
tray than comedy or farcial comedy.
4. Avoid "slap-stick" and gross comedy situatio
5. Avoid sex themes or situations developed
the worn-out subject of the "eternal triangle."
6. Remember that language cannot be pho.
graphed, therefore avoid lengthy description.T
story must be one of action, one which may be v
ualized.
7. Portray your characters concisely and at
times be consistent in the development of yc
theme.
8. It is suggested that the story be based
some plot which revolves around the University.

WOULD YOU WALK DOWN TOWN FOR
$10.00?
This question is entirely legitimate, if you once
discover what values we have to offer. Tailored
to measure in our .Ann Arbor shops, guaranteed
to satisfy you in fit, quality, STYLE, price.-
SUITS AND OVERCOATS - $45.00 UP
(Made in Our Own Shops)
ALBER.T GANSLE
113 MAIN STREET (UP STAIRS)

Remember this contest is open to all students of the Unive
sity with the exceptions of the "Michigan Daily Editor
and Business Staffs.'

I

NOTE:-Any students who are considering submitting. scenarios and who desire any further inf
mation can interview the producing company's representative at the publications reading room, secc
floor of the Press Building, from 2 to 4 o'clock any day except Saturday.

I

1J_

.

FOR SPEED AND QUALITY.

Oscar's

first

Class

Shoe

Repair

1114 South
U niversity

0 N E

DAY

SERVICE

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