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December 03, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-12-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

itS

.MICHIGAN DAILY

L NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
very morning except Monday during the Uiver-
Board in Control of Student Publications,
[BER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ated. Press is exclusivelT entitled to the use for
all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
paper and the local news published therein.'
the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
uby carrier or mail, $3.S0.
nn Arbor Pre.s building, Maynard Street.
usiness, 960; Editorial, 244.

is not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
rily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
of events will be published in The Daily at the
editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
ications will receive no consideration. Noman-
turned unless the. writer incloses postage.
es not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
rimunications.

*EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
~N EDITOR....... BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
Managing Editor...............Hugh W.Hitchcock
or .................. .........E. Y. ioveoy, Jr.
t. E. Adams G. P. Overton
Edward Lambrecht M. B. Stahl
Eughton Mc sin Paul Watzel
Board Chairman...................+T. J. Whiery
T. Beach E. R. Meiss
A. Krn LIeo Hrshdorfer
EagaineEditor.............Thornton W. Sargent, Jr.
Editor.. .............................George E. Sloan
"i.or.............................Sidney B. Cotes
"Editor............................. George Reindel
E dito r . .. . . . .. .. . ... . -- --- - .-- ---- .E li zab eth V ickery
ditr.... ....................... X R. Meisse
Assistants
Byer. L. . Fenwick B.H. Lee
Butler . B. Grndy J E. Mak
Clark Agnes Homquist Kathrine'Montgomery
C. Clark H. Z. Howlett R. C. Moriarity
Comtock Marion Kerr It. B. Tar
'. Dawson S. Kerr Virginia Tron
Donahue . A. Klaver Dorothy Wipplo
Elliott Marion -Koch J L Y*ost
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 90
┬žS MANAgER ............. VERNON F. HILLERY
S..............x..........F. M. Heath, A. ,. Parker
..:...................Nathan W Robertson
......... ....... .... ......John . Hamel, Jr.
n ............... . ... ........... Herold C. Hunt
Assistants
Robbins Richard Cutting H. Willis Heldbreder
PrsJames Prentiss W. Kenneth Galbratk.
'rat ParkMaurice Moule j A. Dryer
cherer Matin Goidringihard Heidemann
ran Tyler Steens T. H. Wolfe
David Park Paul Blum
sATURDAY, DECEMBER 3, 1921
Night Editor-PAUL WATZEL
Assistant-J. E. Mack
Proofreaders-J. M. Bulcley
M. E. Gordon
EQUAL TO THE BURDEN
dent Marion L. Burton hammered into the
f a Detroit audience Monday afternoon the
Lat our young people must be trained to bear'
irwhelming burden of tomorrow, and that
education can arouse these people there is
ich hope f or the future. Accuracy, a zest
ng, .and modernism, must be taught our
hrough the medium of the classroom, accord-
the President. He bemoaned the fact that
ors of Oxford ,university have criticized
an Rhodes scholars as being deficient in
ship in a wide sense.
rican college students, while as a class they
>t yet have learned the saving grace of ac-
- something assimilated later as the mind
s rather than crammed in youthful minds by
iok methods -= certainly are not lacking in
st for living. Rather the ardor and enthu-
which yo h ever possesses impels them to
ide the sphere of their studies. This craving
nd the personnel of their friends and ac-
nces and ever toenter new fields and activ-
akes for all around men who are best fitted
ge in the struggle .for existence, the biolo-
lefinition. of life. Neither must they rely
heir Pinstructors for lessons in modernism.
students are ultra modern. They are the
assimilate new ideas.
fact that Oxford professors have "panned"
an Rhod'es scholars as being deficient as
ed with English students is not cause for
alarm. Foreign students in general are
eir entrance in the primary grades forced to
more than Americans. The difference in
s seems, to be just cause for difference in
A noted Englishman once had occasion to
that the English are better students, but the
ans better educated.
uld be foolishness to concede that there are
rs in our modern educational system. But
the rise or fall of the nation depend upon,
uthful college graduates they may be de--
upon to swing the pendulum in the right
WILL ,IT WIN THE BIG ONES?

nsurgent movement directed against the pro-
al stage and having as its object the estab-
it of community or art theaters in every city,
,nd hamlet is sweeping the country. Toledo
f the recent cities to join the insurgents. The
fishing characteristics of the community the-
e that art is made to predominate, and that
ing is subordinated'to the one purpose of
a mood and having all scenic and exterior
in harmony with that mood. The advo-
f the community theater are staunchly op-
o the practice of the professional stage in
a star or in setting anyone on a higher
aan his fellow actors.
a system as advocated by this movement is
ideal for our smaller cities, but it is
d if the community theater will ever gain

headway against the professional stage in our large
metropolises.
In the first place the average city of moderate'
size is suffering for want of well acted, clean le-
gitimate productions. It is dependent upon theat-
rical magnates in New York city for its amusement
and the number of poor plays is as a rule far in ex-
cess of the good ones. It is no wonder that cities
such as Toledo have -rebelled in the face of such
treatment and turned to the community theater.
Furthermore under this plan the manager and act-
ors are as a rule competent and the fact that no one
is starred helps insure the success of the project as
there is little danger of .the public losing interest
should the leading actor leave the cast, as is often
the case with professional companies.
But in our large metropolises where the best of
productions with the best of casts are shown the
success of the community theater as a competitor
of the professional stage is problematical. In these
cities the audiences are made up largely of busi-
ness men and visitors; people who go to the theater
solely for amusement and who demand action more
than anything else. These people are used to the
best the professional stage can offer and they want
it. They are little interested in art but very much
so in highly press agented stars. Consequently it
is not likely that they can be readily educated to ap-
preciate the offerings of the community theater.
There is a large field for the extension of the art
theater in our smaller cities, but at the present time
it seems hardly plausible that the community thea-
ter will ever supersede the professional stage as the
center of attraction in the larger cities of the coun-
try.
SERVING BY REFUSING
One of the principal faults to be found with the
organization hereabouts for the carrying on of the
various works of the campus is the fact that so
many so-called B. M. O. C.'s, men whose time is
already taken up with countless important positions,
are chosen to act on various and sundry commit-
tees and what-not. The result is that all too fre-
quently these men, being mere humans, let a good
deal of their work go by default, and do justice
really to only their main interests.
Occasionally, however, we find someone big
enough and unselfish enough to withdraw from
some committee, simply because he realizes that he
would be unable to do it full justice. To do such
a thing requires a considerable amount of charac-
ter. To be able to see ahead the distinction of a
veritable dictionary of activities and positions listed
in the Michiganensian is a great temptation to fol-
low the plan of trying anything once, regardless of
the fact that many of the items may mean little as
far as effort, time or results are concerned.
The overly busy man, who is willing to forego the
pleasure of seeing a mile-long array after his name
in the final count, in order that the work of the
campus may be more effectually conducted, is do-
ing the University a big service and deserves rec-
ognition for his unselfishness and good spirit.
More than thirty years ago a medic student won
a pie eating contest by devouring the food in seven
seconds flat. A young la'dy came in with a close
second, accomplishing the feat in ten seconds. What
wonders time hath wrought! From our personal
observations we would say that the average young
lady of today' could place third with perfect ease
in five seconds flat.
A New Orleans judge says that boys' bad habits
are due to physical ills and the modern physician's
common plaint is that physical ills are due to bad
habits. It must be the vicious circle again.
As far as the lower tier goes, a double deck sta-
dium such as is being built at O. S. U. wouldn't
have gone bad at some of the drizzly games seen
at Ferry field.
The T elescope

My Roommate
When I am sleeping snug and sound,
To slumberland with Morpheus bound,
Who throws his shoes, like bricks, around?
My roommate.
When I've removed all signs of dirt,
And in my best am almost girt,
Who, pray, has swiped my one silk shirt?
My roommate.
All day I work, my desk's piled high
With Ec and Math and Poli Sci,
Yet who pulls "A's"? Alas, not I,
My roommate.
The president I fain would bej
And rule the land from sea to sea ;
But who would jump ahead of me?
My roommate.
- eke.
The Rock of Ages
He-t-Je t'adore.
She-Gwan, shut it yourself.
Our Latest Song Entitled:
"Here's to Marcel, Long May He Wave."
Famous Closing Lines
"I've done my part," said the barber as he finished
combing his own hair. ERM.

Narcissus Bulbs with Bowls at

4 1

YI Y M i / 1 Y I Y M A A I 11 Y III

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-.o a.
i. 7:5 a. m., 8:o . in. and hourly to 9:o
p. i.
Jsaeon Express Car (local stops of Ann
Arbor), 9:48 a. in. -and every; two hours to
948 p.m
Local Cars East Bound -:53 a.m., 7 :o a.
m. and dvery two hours to 9:oo p. in., x:oo
p. m.' To Ypsilanti only-x :4o p. n., ra.25
a. xn., ra x a. in.
To Saline,, change at Ypsilanti.
iLocalCars West Bound-7 :5 a. M., 2:40 p.
To Jackson and Kalamaoo-Limited cars:
8:48, 10:49 a. i., r:48, 2:48, :48.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited: 8:48
p.m
1921 DECEMBER 1921
S Mi T W 'T F S8
1 2 S
4 _S B 7; 8 9 10
11 12 19 14 15 18 '17
18 19 20 11 22 28 24
25 28 27 28 29 80 31
NOTICE TO ME
We do all kinds. of high-class Hat
work at pre-war prices. Hats turned
inside out, wid eall new trimmngs
are as good as new.
FACTORY HAT STORE
817 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792
Patronize Daily Advertisers.-Adv.
Try a Daily Want Ad. It pays.-Adv.
I Am Back
At My Trade
Redy To Make
Alterations, Repairing, Cleaning
Pressing by Hand - 50 Cents
SUIT RELINING
,adies' & Gentlemen's Garments
New Collars on Coat.
44 Years at Tailoring
First Class Work
_________In Rear
OVER WAGNER CLOTHING STORE
South State Street
Louis Lindemann
TAILOR
Eat at the
ANN ARBOR
CHOP SUEY
314 S. State Street
PRICES REDUCED
Plain Chop Suey. ... 30c
Extra Fine Chop Suey.140c
BEST IN TASTE
Reasonable in price
Quick in service
Give Us a Trial!
COAL

Pay your Daily subscription at the Don't forget to pay your Daily sub-
Press Bldg.-Adv. scription.-Adv.

GRAHAM' S
21oth Efnds oif the Diagonal Walk

__

---

__ __

111, ,

VA

A Place to bring your friends
Nowhere is the food better
Nowhere is the service more prompt
TUTTLE'S LUNCH ROOM
Maynard Street

For Cold Wintry Days
Wear these styles

I

Worn with woolen hose or
spats, these styles will be

most excellent

for

weather.

We also have

them in boots.

ar
7AO SA 00 that Fs arlo rcf

i

COMOLETE LINE OF GALOSHES AND RUBBERS
WAHR'S SHOE STORE
Down Town 108.So. Main

,11

rri r lil glrll llrlll Irlrrr rr l I rll rrlr r11I Il ll rrl lq III I I rl 11 llrr Irl r1 Irl liri 1111rrrlMll r ll r

"SIAM SOO"

Bituminous
Ge'uine Hocking
High Grade Kentucky
West Virginia
No. 3 and New River
Pocahon as
Anthracite
Upper Lehigh Valley
Scranton White Ash
COKE
Genuine Soivay

THE OANCG DOLL

I I

I

I

Special Price for Saturday
only - 98c
Regular Price - $2.25

GRAFINOLAS
fermerly selling
at $17.25
now
$148.25
-w+ith
Twenty-Five
Double Disk.
Records
tMxaker Your
Selections Nowel

See them in Our Window.

Can be Used on Any Talking Machine.

OPERA MUSIC

ON SALE

The Pruner Coal Co,
INCORPORATED
Retailers and Jobbers of
Coal and Coke
124 E. Huron Street
Bell Phone 1950 F-1

TUESDAY

AT-

ALLMENIyINGER'S MUSIC SHOP
305, Maynard Street

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