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December 03, 1921 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-12-03

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XXXII. No. 59

At
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1921

1

DOENTS MUST
UY BASKETBALL
TICKETS EXTR

Ignaz Freidma iiPolish Composer,.
Plays Monday In Concert Series

T

BOOK COUPONS NOT .EXCHANG.
ABLE FOR ADMISSION
STUBS
NEW RULE CAUSED
BY ACTION OF REGENTS
Price for Six Games Set at Two
Dollars; Sale Starts
Tuesday
As a result of the ruling passed last
February by the Board of Regents to
the effect that beginning with the
present' semester, the athletic tax
which is a part of the annual tuition
shall not entitle the student to ad-
mission to indoor athletic events,
coupon books will not admit students
to basketball games this season.
Instead the games will be divided
into two groups, "A" group and "B"
group. Season tickets for each group
will cost #2. These tickets will be
placed on sale Tuesday morning at
the athletic office.
Groups Announced
Group A includes the following con-
tests: Carnegie Technical Institute,
ec. 30;M.A.C., Jan. ; Ohio State
University, Jan. 9; Indiana Univer-
sity Feb. 20, and the University of
Illinois, Feb. 25. The Chicago indoor
track meet is also included in the
group..
gGroup B consists of the fol lowing
games: Western State Normal, Dec.
9; Carnegie Technical Institute, Dec.
Dec. 31; Unversity of Chicago, Jan.
10; University of Wisconsin, Feb. 18;
University of Iowa, Mar. 4; and
Nrthwesten University, Mar. .t
Bach student may buy one of these
group season tickets beginning Tues-
day morning. If they are not all tak-
en by Friday, students may buy the
other group providing they bought
one; or, if they have bought none,
they max buy both groups at tha1
time.
Rule of Regents
The motion passed relative to this
ruling at the February Regents' meet-
ing was as follows: "Because of the
impossibility of seating the entire stu-
dent body ,at any indoor event, such
as an indoor track meet or a basket-
ball game, from and after the begin-
nig of the first semester of 1921-
1922 the outdoor physical education fee
now a part of the annual tuition shall.
nt entitle the student to admission
to these events. The Board in Con-
trol of Outdoor Athletics is authorized
to charge a reasonable, proper admis-
sion fee for such events."
Daily Prints Ruling
The Regents' meeting at which this
ruling was passed took place during
the period of final examinations. Upon
* resuming publication after the inter-
mission The Daily, on Feb. 23, 1921,
printed the following mention of the
ruling:
"The Regents ordered that with the
beginning of the fall semester next
October, the athletic tar which is a
part of the anual tuition shall not
entitle the students to admission to
indoor athletic events. Tis action was
ma de necessary by the fact that it is
impossible to seat the entire student
body at any indoor event."
ELEVEN MICHIGAN STUDENTS
COMPETE FOR RHODES PRIZE
Philadelpia, Dec. 2.-Five hundred
and six candidates for Rhodes schol-
arships will appear tomorrow before
committees of elections in 32 states to
compete for the 32 appointments to
Oxford. It is the largest number of
candidates for a single year since the
scholarships were established. Ohio
leads the list with 41. Michigan has t

11 candidates. The" men elected will
enter Oxford in October, 1922.

Ignaz Friedman, Polish pianist, will
give the next concert on the Choral
Union series at 8 o'clock Monday eve-
ning in Hill auditorium. He will play,
a program of three divisons, the first'
composed of works from Beethoven
and Bach-Busoni, the second, of
works fromBChopin and the last of
three of his on compositions with
the "Tannhauser" overture by Wag-
ner-Liszt as his closing number.
Mr. Friedman is the third and last
of the great group of living Polish
pianists, the other two members be-
ing Ignaz Paderewski and Vladimir
de Pachmann. He was born at Pod-
gorre, near Cracow, Poland, in 1882.
He early showed musical abilityand
at the age of eight had advanced suf-
ficiently far as to be able to transpose
the fugues of Bach without difficulty.
As a youth he played in innumerable
recitals during his long seasons of
European tours.
Last spring he made concert tours
of Holland, Spain and Portugal with
the greatest possible success. From
Spain he travelled to South America,
DEBAT TEAMSPREPARE
FoR CONTEST JANN. 20

where, during the first month, he gave
a record number of 23 recitals. This
year he is giving recitals in most
American music centers as well as ap-
pearing with the leading symphony
orchestras.
As a. comp oser,+ Ignaz Friedman
ranks high, having already 85 pub-
lished works on sale, including one
important concerte for piano with
orchestra, a quintette for piano and
strings, three other string quartettes,
compositions for the piano, and many
songs.

REMINSTON OPENS
RIELIGIOUS M'EET
Christian Calings Confernee Starts
With Speeches by Faculty and
Churchmen
REPRESENTATION OF FIFTEEN
COLLEGES AMONG DELEGATES
"If the church dies the world dies,"
is a statement made by Bishop W. P.
Remington at the opening of the State
Christian Callings conference for col-
lege men last night in the Methodist
church that sounds one of the key-
notes of the conference that has drawn'
together more than 250 interested

Freshman Spread
Set Jor Tonight
All plans and decorations are com-
plete for the forty-first annual Fresh-
man spread to be held at 7:30 o'clock
tonight in Barbour gymnasium.
In the receiving line will be Mrs.
Marion L. Burton, Dean Myra B.
Jordan, Mrs. Marcus L. Ward, Mrs.
Henry Bates, Mrs. Alfred Lloyd, Mrs.
Joseph A. Bursley, Mrs. John .R. Ef-
finger, Mrs. Mortimer Cooley, Mrs.
Wilbert Hinsdale, Mrs. Edward Kraus,
Mrs. Allen Whitney, Mrs. Junius Beal,
Dr. Eloise Walker, Miss Marion
Wood, Miss Marion Dawley, Miss Mil-
dred Sherman, Frieda Diekhoff, '24,
and Mary Hayes, '24.
The grand march, to be led by Alice
Powell, 25, Kathyrn Blackburn, '25,
Frieda Diekhoff, '24, and Mary Hayes,
'24, will form at 8:30 o'clock, and
dancing will follow as the main en-
tertainment of the evening, the favor
dance being an especial "feature.
George Rogers' orchestra will furnish
the Inusic.

VARSITY MEN MEET TONIGHT
PRESENTATION
PRACTICE

FOR

Both Michigan teams for the Jan.
20 debate between the members of the
Central Debating league have com-
pleted their briefs and will meet this
morning for formal presentation of
them. The resolution for this debate
is "that the Kansas Industrial Court
system of settling industrial disputes
should be adopted throughout the
United Stptes."
The order in which the members of
both teams will speak has ben an-
nounced and is as follows: the affirm-
ative team, first George E. Bigge, '23,
second Edward T. Ramsdell, '23,
third Ralph R/ Johnson, '23; the neg-
ative team, first Gail EB. Densmore,
'22, second Gerrit Demmink, '23, third
Paul A. Rehmus, '23.
This debate4will be a triangua af-
fair; Northwestern, Chicago, and
Michigan will participte in it jointly
and on the same evening. Michigan's
negative team will go to Evanston to
meet Northwestern's affirmative team,
Northwestern's negative team will
travel to Chicago to debate the affirm-
ative team of that University,-while
Chicago will send her negative team
here to meet Michigan's affirmative
debaters in Hill auditorium on the
evening of Jan. 20.
Decisions will be made as to the
winners of this debate at the respec-
tive places of the debates. Judges
have not as yet been chosen, but
probably will be selected at the con-
vention of the National. Association
of Teachers, of Speech which will be
held Dec. 28, 29, and 30 in Chicago.
BAND APPEARS AT
SUNDAY CONCERT
The Varsity band will appear on the
Faculty concert series at 4:15 o'clock
tomorrow afternoon in Hill auditorium.
The band will be under the leadership
of Capt. Wilfred Wilson, head of the
band instrument department of the
School of Music. Between the two
groups of numbers planned by the
band there will be mass singing, led
by George Oscar Bowen, head of the
public schodi music department of the
school. Among the numbers chosen
by the band appears Sousa's "Wedding
March", Which will be played tomor-
row for the first time in Ann Aror.
SIGMA DELTA CHI TO DISCUSS
MICHIGAN NEWS BUREAU WORK
Members of Sigma Delta Chi will
hold a special meeting at 4 o'clock
Sunday afternoon in the Union. The
work of the Michigan News bureau,
which was recently established under
the direction of the local chapter of
the fraternity, will be discussed with
a view to securing the greatest possi-
ble co-operation with papers through-
out this section of the country in the
iistribution of University news. A
program of work for the remainder of
the semester will also be considered.

GIST FOR OPERA
REAY TO SHOW
Intense Practice During the Past Few
Weeks Rounds Company
Into Shape
ALL COSTUME DETAILS HERE
FOR MIMES PRODUCTION
Cast and chorus of the Michigan Un-
on opera, 'Make It For Two' which
appears on the public stage for the
first time next Tuesday evening, Dec.
6, are now ready for their first ap-
pearance. Do to the diligent effort of
the past few weeks, little work re-
mains to be done, and with the arrival
of the wigs, dresses, and shoes, Thurs-
day and yesterday, all is in readiness
for the raising of the curtain.
Shoes for the various specialty and
feature dlances arrived at the theater
Thursday, and have been tried out in
rehearsals both Thursday and last
night. The -shoes for the stop dance,
which were made by I. Miller and
company of New York City, were
especially designed and built for the
men who take part in this number.
They are patent leather pumps with
heavy wooden soles and small bells in
the heels, which keep time to the
music of the dance. The chorus in
this feature which occurs in the sec-
ond act, is made up of 13 "girls," and
the dress is one of the most effective
of the* show, consisting of a short,
white skirt, abbreviated military jack-
et, and jaunty cap.
Wigs will play a most important
part in the opera this year, and be-
cause of the gorgeous gowns to be
(Continued on Page Eight)
Guthe Tells Of
city -Hunting
I Guatemala
"Hunting- Ruined Cities in Guate-
mala", proved to be an absorbing topic
as treated by Dr. Carl E. Guthe last
evening at the Unitarian church. Dr.
Guthe is the son of the late Dean K.
L. Guthe, of the Graduate school and
former head of the physics depart-
ment.
The lecturer formerly attended the
Engineering school here, but later be-
came interested in archaeology, and
since completing a graduate course at
Harvard university has been on eight
expeditions, a later one of which form-
ed the, basis of kis talk last night.'
This expedition was made in the
spring of 1920 under the auspices of
the Carnegie Institution of Washing-
ton through British Honduras and
Guatemala to the great lake, Reden-
Itza, near the center of the North-
ern jungle.
His lecture covered the story of the
findings in a great ruined city with"
a civilization which corresponds to
that of Greece in the western rworld.
Existing before the time of Charle-
magne, during the second to the sev-
enth centuries these people, agricul-
tural in occupation, gathered in cities
with government partly hereditary
and partly elective where they became
advanced in primitive astronomy and
medicine.
The Mayas built large pyramids,
civic centers and palaces with sur-
rounding monuments covered with
hieroglyphics, telling of a civilization
the most-highly evolved of the Indian
peoples. These ruins have existed,

for centuries, ages, waiting for sci-
entists to uncover their secrets, but
it has been only in recent times that
their extensive contributions have
been discovered and interpreted to add
much to the history. of the world '

The addresses which followed the
banquet were opened by the chairman
of the advisory committee, Dr. H. R.
Chapman, of the Ann Arbor Baptist
church. President Marion L. Burton
was the first speaker who took for his
subject, "The Challenge of Religion."
In this' he demonstrated the two kinds
of lives that one might live; the one
following a planned course and the
other merely drifting. He stated that
America's greatness was due only to
the ambitions and the plans that were
in the hearts of its founders and which
have been carried out by their succes-
sors. But he pointed out the plan, to
be a true snecess must make the most
of you, must help someone else, and
must be something that is unattain-
able. He stated that to him religion
meant friendship with God.
President Burton was followed by
Dr. Charles W. Gilkey, pastor of the
Hyde Park Baptist church of Chicago,
which is largely a students church.His
subject was "The Opportunities for
Religious leadership." In developing
this he quoted the statements made by
the British representatives after the
peace conference in Versailles, H. G.
Wells, George Bernard Shaw, r Lord
Bryce, and others that to religion and
religion alone was the world questions
to be satisfactorily solved.
250 Delegates Present
Bishop W. P. Remington, former
track star in the University of Penn-I
sylvania, and now bishop suffragan of-
North Dakota in the Episcopal church,
concluded the addresses with "The
Joys of Ministry." Totally dispelling
the once prevalent opinion that a min-
ister had to be a long-faced individual,
Bishop Remington showed that the
ministry was a joy to him and told
what many of these joys were.
More than 150 of the delegates in
attendance are from outside schools
representing in all some 15 colleges'
'nd junior colleges of the state. The
men and the Michigan delegates will
attend five sessions tomorrow which
will be held in Lane, hall.
SOPHOMORE LIT CLASS DANCE
POSTPONED UNTIL JANUARY
Members -of the sophomore literary
class have postponed, their dance
which was to have been held ondDec.
10 until after the Christmas holidays.
Inability' to secure a suitable hall at'
the- present time is the reason given
for postponement by C. J. Verkerke,
'24, chairman of the class social com-
mittee.. An effort will be made toc
hold the dance as soon as possible
after school reconvenes in January.

1- LITS MUST RE.ALOT

I ON HOPCOMMITTEEMEN
BUT ONE MAN OF THOSE ELECTED
WEDNESDAY DECLARED
ELIGIBLE
T. P. Bank, president of the junior
lit class, has called for a re-election
of committeemen for the J-Hop, ow-
ing to the eligibility of but one man
of the four elected at the class meet-
ing last Wednesday.' '
Robert D. Gibson of Grand Rapids
is the only eligible man on the com-
mittee, according to a statement given
out Friday afternoon by Joseph A.
Bursley, Dean of Men.
R. V. Rice was the first choice as
chairman, but inasmuch as he has
but 45 1-2 hours credit he is classed
as a sophomore until the second se-
mester. However, according to Dean
Bursley, there is no ruling that would
prevent Rice from assuming the chair-
manship since he would, presumptive-
ly, be a junior at the time of the
Hop. This, though, would be a mat-
ter for decision by the Student Af-
fairs committee.
W. O. Klingman was elected com-
mitteeman representing the medics and
H. P. Buckingham from the hom-
oeops.
THIRTEEN CHEMICS INITIATED
INTO PHI LAMBDA UPSILON
Phi Lambda Upsilon, national hon-
orary chemical fraternity, held its ini-
tation last night in' the Chemical
building. The following men were
initiated: L. W. Keinpf, '23E, A. D. Oet-
jen, '23E, L. M. Litzenberger, grad,
John France, '23, John Ross, grad,
Carl C. Tasker, '22P, L. A. Pridzeon,
grad, R. R. Wilson, grad, R. R. Tan-
ner, '22, J. W. Matthias, '23E, F. W.
Burns, '23E, Leonard Wagener grad,
and O. L. Tabern, grad.
CABINET MEETING CONSIDERS
QUESTION OF RU SIAN RELIEF
Washington, Dec. 2.--Consideration
was given at today's cabinet meeting
to proposals that the government give
direct aid to Russian relief. No deci-
sion was reached but it was indicat-
ed that President Harding and his ad-
visers probably would confer on the
matter.

men.

Dr. Chapman P'resides

0-

MORE FAVORfA
ON NVAL
BASIS FOR OPTIMISM:
AS RESULT OF LEA
CONFEESC
CHINA, JAPAN DE
SHANTUNG Q
Far East Committee May A
General Policy in
Meeting
(By Associated Pr
Washington, Dec. 2. --:
In the negotiations over I
of naval ratio, described a
orable," is understood to
reached at toight's con
tween the representatives
ed States, Great Britain a
After the conference bet
tary Hughes Admiral Bar
Arthur J. Balfour, was co
Japanese delegation 1mm
gan communicating with
"Most Important Disci
The conferenec lasted
hours, and intimations we
its conclulon that; ba
for some optimism. One
spokesman referred to it
the -most important disc
held which would mean i
success of the conference
The result was "most fa
added
The conciliatory influen
Britain gave a more ho;
to the controversy over2
today. An authorized p
the British delegation r
purpose of his governmen
best efforts, for a solutio
China and Japan If
During the 'day the' Am
gation also held along di
the naval prdblem whil
Eastern committee debat
result, the question of '
foreign troops from Chin
Chinese and Japanese in
meeting got drown to busin
efforts to settle thebSha
troversy,. A broadly dra
tion of general policy on
question may be adopted
Eastern committee. tomc
the-sShantung discussion
until Monday afte. the
have set forth the general
their positions.
News f th
IN BRIEF
Chicago, Dec. 2.-Attorn
Chicago Tribune today fir
argument to the demurre
William Hale Tho'npson t
une pleas of justification fi
article on which the mayo
suit for $500,000 libel.
Weymouth Kirkland, foi
une, argued justification c
of fair comment in suppor
tidle, which was based on
alleged refusal to stop a
the people's council for d=
terms of peace, calledl
war.
New York, Dec. 2.-Sh
derson, novelist, has been
annual prize of 2,000 ofe

Dial in recognition of
American letters.
Vienna, Dec. 2.-Virtual
ness wasnsuspended tod;
consequence of the' serio
which raged in the city
yesterday. Daylight disclc
extent of the damage, whi
matedby the newspaper
billions of, crowns.
London, Dec. 2.-Accor
London Times' parliamen
spondent, the government
posal concerning Ireland i
allegiance shall be sworn
Free State, to the comm
nations known as the Brit
and to the King as the 1
community of nations.
spondent adds that the p
provide that there shall be
ment of religions and n
caste in the apDointment

Permanent Poor Bloys Summer Camp
Assured Dy Alumni Throughout State

BUSINESS TRYOUTS
Tryouts for The Daily busi-
ness staff may see the business
manager in the publications of-
fices from 8:30 to 12 o'clock to-
day. Men interested in general
newspaper work and advertising

"A permanent University of Mlchi-
gan camp for poor boys is assured of
being a reality by next summer by
alumni throughout the state," said
Louis Reimann, of the Student Chris-
tian association, in a statement yes-
terday afternoon.
"The exact location for the perma-
nent camp has not yet been decided
upon, but will be selected within the
next two or three weeks," said Rei-
mann. "A temporary camp each year
such as we had last summer would
hA ton AxnAivea nd ia .n+ . a s. I

factory in caring for the boys as a
fixed place would be."
One of the plans for obtainng the
money is to make up a budget, which
it is _estimated will be about $10100:
The budget would cover the cost of a
kitchen, mess hall, store room, head
quarters, boats, tents, and blankets.
Flint alumni signified their inten-
tion of raising approximately $1,000
for the camp at a meeting held last
Tuesday night and suggested that the
camp be located 18 miles east of.
Flint on Pleasant lake. Prof. William
D. Henderson and Louis Reimann
.SMIA :A th+ nnd -

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