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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 15, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TH.

CHIGAN DAILY

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
y year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associamed Press is exclusively entitled to thee for
ublication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
dited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
is matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
ture not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
th, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
icretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
riigned communications will receive no consideration. No nan-
cript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
essed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
ANAGING EDrTOR..........BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
sistant Managing Editor..............Hugh W. Hitchcock
y Editor ............. .... ......E. P. Lovejoy, Jr.
fght Editors-
R. E. Adams G. P. Overton
Edward Lambrecht M. B. Stahl
Hugston McBain Paul Watzel
itorial Board Chairman........... ..........T. J. Whinery
sistants-
S. T. Beach E. R. Meiss
L. A. Kern Leo Hershdorfer
,day Magazine Editor................Thornton W. Sargent, Jr.
change Editor...........................George E. Sloan.
sic Editor........ .....................Sidney B.. Coates
orting Edit)r........................George Reindel
>men's Editor ..........................Elizabeth Vickery
mor Editor ................................E R. Meiss
Assistants
R. N. Byers L. L. Fenwick B. H. Lee
W. B. Butler H. B. Grundy . E. Mack
A. D. Clark Agnes Iolmquist thrine Montgomery
Harry C. Clark H. E . Howlett R. C. Moriarity
P. Constock Marion Kerr R. B. Tarr
John P. Dawson L. S. Kerr Virginia Tron
A. Donahue M. A. Kaver Dorothy Whipple
W. F. Elliott Marion c Koch I,. L. Yost

_.. . .

experience, Secretary Hughes should be able to im-
part to the seniors a message that will be truely
beneficial and not merely high sounding rhetoric.
EVEN THE MIGHTY -
Things often go wrong in the petty affairs which
combine to make up the average mans' life. The
college student wonders why his carefully pre-
pared budget, no matter how perfect, still finds him
penniles by the fifteenth of the month instead of
proudly spending his last dollar as the next check
arrives from home. Much the same feeling is ex-
perienced by the newlywed housekeeper. Plans for
a picnic invariably end up with rain. At school a
night of pleasure always precedes a surprise blue-
book. Earnest endeavor to study is inevitably ac-
companied by friends who haven't a thing on earth
to do. The most embarrassing telephone calls oc-
cur when someone else is in the room. And a missed
class on the qay before or after a holiday is sure to
rate three bolts. Such is a suggestion of the herit-
age of the average individual - a hopelessly in-
adequate suggestion in scope.
But who has not witnessed with admiration the
smooth-running plans of the mighty? The advent
of a noted dignitary is bound to be a masterpiece
of skillful execution. The band is out, boy scouts
line the road from the station to keep the crowd
back, a reception committee grapples onto the bag-
gage while shaking hands and displaying numer-
ous gold and some white teeth, and the dignitary
glides smoothly away to a prominent hotel in a
borrowed limousine. There a smooth looking clerk
escorts him over soft carpets to a comfortable
suite (the very word suggests smoothness) and the
plans run off like velvet. This is the fortune of
the mighty - it seems to characterize all their pub-
lic acts and arrangements.
But that even the mighty fall -- or fail, as the
saying might go - was demonstrated conclusively
to our thunderstruck average ears by the story of
the traffic jam at Arlington cemetery on Armistice
day. Smoothness, that sine qua non which should
have been the watchword in the conducting of such
an occasion when the statesmen of many nations
were gathered to pay tribute to the unknown Amer-
ican heroes of the war, was forgotten by both the
police and the army in their handling of the affair.
As a result of their inefficiency high officials of
great nations were forced to descend from their
cars and walk to the ceremonies, others missed the
services altogether, while trees had to be hewn
down so that the automobile of Marshal Foch
might pass, and a flying squadron of special police-
men was required to get President Harding to the
scene of action.
Such a hitch in the program of the mighty is in-
deed regrettable. For us poor blundering scions of
the ayerage, however, it is at once a shocking disil-
lusionment and an inward encouragement to dis-
cover that even among the greatest, "the best laid
plans of mice and men" do sometimes "gang
agley".

..

Log Log Slide Rules

AT,

GRAHAM'S
7both ends of the diagonal )s'alk

II

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars--6.Os a.
*., 7:o5 a. in., 8:o a. m. and hourly to :Io
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
Arbor), 9:48 a. m. and every two hours to
9:48 P. m.
Local Cars East Bound-s :5s a.m., 7:oo a.
m. and every two hours to g:oo p.. 1it :oo
p. mi. To Ypsilanti only-i i :4o p. tn., 12.25
a, mi., 1 : r 5a.in.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:5o a. m., 2:4o p.
M.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars:
8:48, :48(a a. in., 12:48, 248, 4:48.
To Jackson and Lansing--Limited: 8:48
p. Mn.
1921 NOVEMBER 1921
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30
NOTICE TO MEN
We do all kinds of 'high-class Hat
work at pre-war prices. Hats turned
inside out, with all new trimmings,
are as good as new.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792
BOOK THE NEW
University
NOVELTY FIVE
For your next party
or dance
765.J , CONBOY, Mgr.

L

V P1
LR
E ERS E
APRESSERS20-ACS
N N
N
G G
Phone 628
REPAIRING
WHEN ANYTHING GOES WRONG

4

J. ". " oung

: BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER..............VERNON F. HILLERY
Advertising. ..................F. M. Heath, A. J. Parker
Publication ........................... Nathan W. Robertson
Accounts'............................... John J. Hamels, Jr.
Circulation.................................. Herld C. Hunt
Assistants
Burr L. Robbins RichardCutting H. Willis Heidbreder
W. Cooley James Prentiss W. Kenneth Galbraith
I. Beaumont Parks Maurice Moie J. A. Dryer
Walter Scherer ,lax tin Goldring Richard Heidean
Edw. Murane Tyler Stevens T. H. Wolfe
David Park' Paul Blum
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1921
Night Editor-M. B. STAHL
Assistant-George E. Sloan. Proof-
readers-Leland L. Yost, William B.
Butler.
The Cubs' club will meet at 4:30 o'clock this
afternoon.
HELP THEM EARN IT'
Equally as praiseworthy as the fact that the
University posts of the American Legion, Veterans
of Foreign Wars, and Gun and Blade are taking
upon themesves to raise the necessary funds to
complete the reading room of the Michigan Union,
are the methods which are being adopted to finance
the plan. No attempt will be made to launch a di-
rect assault upon the pocketbooks of the already
financially burdened students, but the necessary
quota will be reached by holding a series of enter-
tainments which 'will be of high order. The first
of these will be a dance in Barbour gymnasium to
begiven next Friday and the night of the Minne-
sota game. In January one theatrical enterprise at
least will be given in Hill auditorium.
If the Michigan Union is to retain its reputation
as the leading college club in the country the build-
ing must be completed in the near future. The serv-
ice organizations have undertaken a large enter-
prise in attempting to raise the money to finish one
of the Union's two unfinished divisions. For these
reasons and in view of the fact the service organi-
zations are earning the money and not asking for
donations it is right to expect that the students
will support the efforts of the Veterans Memorial
Coinmittee to make the completion of the reading
room possible. If you are dancing this week-end,
help finish the Union by going to Bargour gymna-
sium.
SECRETARY HUGHES
By the acceptance of Charles Evans Hughes,
Secretary of State, of President Marion L. Bur-
toh's invitation to deliver the 1922 commencement
'address the University and the Senior class are ex
ceptionally honored.
.AI present the eyes of the entire world are fo-
cused n Mr. Hughes and there are few men in the
country whose addresses would command more at-
tention or be received with more respect than the
present secretary of state.
?Mr. Hughes has had a long career in the service
of, the government in high capacities. He first
sprang into national prominence when elected gov-
ernor of 'the state of New York .and later as a
member of the United States Supreme court. After
resigning from this ,position to be a candidate for
the presidency, Mr. Hughes was appointed secre-
tary of state by President Harding.
At the present moment Mr. Hughes is facing the
greatest task of his political career as head of the
American delegation and presiding chairman at
the Disarmament Conference. By many he is con-
sidered the outstanding figure in this great world
parley.
The active participation of Mr. Hughes in these
history making episodes makes his coming address
both timely and eventful. With his great store of
successful achievements behind him, and the deep
understanding that only comes from lon years of

with your plumbing or heating
system callus

2452

Our Service

Wanted-

some
Will
your

Six fellokvs to earn
e Christmas money.
I not interfere ]pith
present ]pork. See

is prompt and courteous

eranek C .Martin

the Telescope

I
I

KOPLOY
507 Elm after3 o 'clock

320 North Main

ANN ARBOR

I'

Wish We'd Been There
Dear Erm:
This morning early
I saw a sight
I would like you to see;
A damsel fair'
Continually crossed
In her own path
It seemed to me, -
For though pigeon toed,
She was trying to ski,-
I thank you.
-Erma.

4

Observations
That musically inclined confidence man who made
himself so popular recently in Ann Arbor certainly
handed the boys a saxa-phoney line.
Quoth Ep ie Taff:
He died game,
Did William Leer,
A hunter shot him
For a deer.
--Helen Blazes.
Ann Arbor Dave:
The Dean's office.
Guess the Inspiration
Your reasoning, sir, is most unique,
Your logic, sir, though quite meandering
Is like unto the Lord's sweet peace,
In that it passeth understanding.
-Vee Dee.
It must be terribly discouraging to the postage
stamp to know that it's always in for a licking.
Stolen Thunder
A way back in the good old days
When folks would practice saving ways,
They took a pair of father's pants
And cut them down for brother.
Since then all things have suffered change.
To practice thrift we now arrange
To purloin little sister's skirt,
And cut it down for mother.
- Oron Jade.,
Famous Closing Lines
"I wonder if there is any change in me" mused
the cashier as he swallowed a dime.
IRM.

n.Med.icine..
WHEN you get out into the medical world, you'll find
young doctors are judged by something more than
diagnostic ability and knowledge of their subject. The at-
mosphere of success plays its part-the evidence that you
have "arrived." And among the little details that indicate
success, there's the habit of preferring
he acrino
!The One Cigarette Sold the World Over"

Remember that Melachrino is amasterblend
of the finest Turkish Tobaccos as originated
byMiltiadesMelachrino. Egyptian cigarettes
are simply those that originated in Egypt.
But the tobacco is what you want to know
about-and if it's Melachrino-it's right.

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