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November 15, 1921 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



SPECIAL

A'LICE BRAD ComPAREs
STAGE WITH SCREEN
FAMOUS ACTRESS SEES LITTLE
DIFFERENCE BETWEEN
PROFESSIONS

For Tuesday and Wednesday Only

Large Yellow Mums

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Cold Winter Ahead!
Not however for those
who, are wise and get
their coal supply n o w
for future comfort.
You can save yourself
much discomfort and
inconvenience later by
calling
COIRNWELL COAL
CORNWELL BLOCK

Alice Brady is one of the few Am-
erican actresses of whom it can be
said is equally successful on both the
stage and screen. And Miss Brady's
appearance at the Whitney theater,
Friday and Saturday, Nov. 18 and 19
in "Forever After" again focuses at-
tention on her very real ability as an
actress.
Does Both Herself
Miss Brady, as nearly every one
knows, continues her work before the
motion picture camera, while appear-
ing behind the footlights of the legi-
timate stage, and her views on acting
before the camera and behind the
footlights are of unusual interest. She
doesn't believe for example, that there
is much difference, at least from her
standpoint, between the two and it
has been her experience that work
before the camera has helped her
work on the stage. Says Miss Brady:
" do not believe there is'any vast
difference between acting before the
motion picture and behind the foot-
lights of the so-called 'legitimate'
stage. This opinion is naturally based
entirely on my own experience. In
almost constantly doing both for the
past two years I have found that the
one is an aid to the other. The point
of view in making comparison between
the two methods must of necessity
depend somewhat upon one's liking
the stage over the screen 'and vice
versa. Personally I enjoy my work in
pictures as much as I do appearing
behind the footlights.
Screen a Little Easier
Certain effects, of course, are much
easier to achieve for the screen. It
sometimes takes ten minutes to get
on the stage an effect which thru the
camera may be had in a minute. The
close-up and other things which may
be done with the camera are respon-
sible. The use of the close-up, for
example immediately concentrates the
attention of the audience upon the
player and the effect that player is
striving for.
HOLD TRYOUTS FOR
DEBATING TEAM S
Second elimination tryouts for Mich-
igan's Central league debating team
Saturday morning reduced the number
of contestants to 11, who will com-
pete in the final elimination next Sat-
urday night when there will be five
minute speeches on each side of the
question to be discussed.
At this time both the negative and
affirmative teams will be chosen and
work for the January 20 debates will
be begun. On that date one side of
the Michigan team will meet the Uni-
versity of Chicago team at Chicago
and the other Northwestern Universi-
ty at Evanston.
Those who will compete in the final
elimination Saturday are as follows:
George Bigge, '23, K. F. Clardy, '24,
Gerrit Demmink, '23, G. E. Densmore,
'22, Phillips Elliott, '22, Max Erbaugh,
'23, Julius Glasgow, '23, Ralph John-
son; '23, Edward Ramsdell, '23, Paul
. Rehmus, 23 and Celma Simonson,
'23.
Episcopal girls-we are having a
bake sale today at Harris Hall. Come
and bring your friends.-Adv.

Call Staffteeting
Whimsies Evening
Whimsies editorial staff is expected
to create a unique literary atmos-
phere in their "Whimsies Evenings,"
organized as a get-acquainted club for
those interested in writing. The first
"evening" will be held Thursday night
at the home of Prof. Roy W. Cowden,
Whimsies faculty adviser. Guests will
come by invitation. Robert Frost-the
poet will also attend by invitation.
Present plans are that a limited
number of people will attend, so that
a more intimate atmosphere of friend-
ship may be fostered.
A different group of guests will be
invited to each of the gatherings.
Those who have been invited once,
however, it is expected, will feel free
to "drop in" at other evenings held
later in the year.
ANN ARBOR GIRLS ORGANIZE
TO ASSIST WOMEN'S LEAGUE
An organization of Ann Arbor girls
as a business and social unit was ef-
fected at a meeting held Saturday af-
ternoon in Sarah Caswell Angell hall.
Extensive plans are being made where-
by town girls may take a large part
in the work of the Christmas. bazaar
and the financial campaign for the
proposed new women's building.
Regular meetings will be held on a
date to be announced later. The fol-
lowing officers were elected: Frances
Todd, '23, president; Esther Barth, '24,
vice-president; Gertrude Neumann, '23,
secretary; I-lope Chipman, 22, treas-
urer.
MARI.EA BAND SECURED
FOR ENGAGEMENT HERE
Arrangements have been made by
the .Wuerth theater for a four day
stopover of the famous Marimba band,
of Guatemala, Central America, which
began Sunday. This band of phono-
graph reord fame are including Ann
Arbor in their tour of western states.
The band consists of a cello and a
saxaphone in addition to the special
marimba instruments. During the
comedies, dance music will be played
and a special program of classical
music will also be given.
Special discount on personal Christ-
mas Card orders received before
Nov. 20. 0. D. Morrill, 17 Nickel's Ar-
cade. Open evenings.-Adv.
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~MANN'S
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MALTED
MI LKSI
at .
SMann's Drug Store
2 13 South Main Stret
5111111111I1i~IllHI 1n1111111111111111111111111107

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The Flao

A Winning Team

T HE manufacturer who doesn't label his
product may be afraid of public opinion.
The manufacturer who does trade-mark his goods
courts public opinion. The manufacturer who
doubly identifies his product-like the maker of
Eagle Shirts in distinctively naming the individual
fabric as well as the shirt itself-that manu-
facturer gives you the broadest, strongest as well
as the most particular guarantee you can ever
hope to get.
Brand name and fabric name is a team that
must make good.

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Buy Eagle Shirts by the fabric name in the label

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THE TURKISH CIGARETTE
E VERY day MURADS never fail-never change-
are held higher in the You are proud to smoke
estimation of the men them in any company-on

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who sroke them.
They are the standard of
Taste.
They are 100% pure Turk-
ish tobacco--of the finest
varieties grown.
They never disappoint -

any occasion.
They are the largest sell-
ing high-grade cigarette in
the world.
The cigarette smokers of
America DO prefer Quality
to Quantity.

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