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November 15, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEATHER
AND COLDER
TODAY

.

4p
an

Da1133

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DI AND NIGHT WIRE
SElLVICE

J1. No. 44

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1921

PRICE FIVZ CENTS

CONFERENCEWORK
OF COMMITTEES
FAR EASTERN QUESTION GIVEN
TO BIG FIVE MEMBERS
FOR SOLUTION
ENGLAND MAY DIFFER'
ON HOLIDAY LENGTH
Great Britain and Japan Both Likely
To Agree "In Principle" to
Plan
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Nov.14.-The real work
of the armament negotiations was
transferred today from the open con-
ference to the more secluded precincts
of the committee.rooms. After a de-
bate which. developed widely separate
views on the advisability of giving
publicity to the negotiations, the big
five, comprising the chief delegates of
the United States, Great Britain,
France, Italy and Japan settled on the
committee plan as the only acceptable

solution.

.4

To countries whose membership will
be identical with that of the full con-
ference itself was assigned the task
of working out a solution for the Far
Eastern question. Another, composed
of all the delegates of the five great.
powers, was created to take over the
negotiations on the main topic of arm-
ament limitation. Since only the dele-
gates of the five powers are qualified
to act on armament limitation in the
conference, the result in each case
will be to resolve the delegates into a
"committee of the whole."
Although no official would make a
prediction prior to the assembling of
the two committees, the presumption
everywhere tonight was that the meet-
ing would be held behind closed doors
and that the public would get a
glimpse of the proceedings only in
their capacity as committee men.
Great Britain's acceptance "in prin-
ciple" of the American proposal em-
bracing suggestions for alterations of
the plan in several important details
will be presented in tomorrow's ses-
sion of the conference by Arthur J.
Balfour. Japan's acceptance "in prin-
ciple," although it has been forecast
by the statement of Baron Admiral
Kato, may be delayed as the Japanese,
mission is obligated to confer with
Tokyo.
Mr. Balfour may not outline the de-
tails of the reservations Great Britain-
wishes to make, but they are substant-
ially described this way:
Instead of a flat ten year holiday
Great Britain wants to replace a pro-
gram which will be an elastic one-
spread over a period of years.

CLASS OFFICERS
TO MEET COUNCIL
Class presidents and other class of-
ficers of the University will meet
with members of the Student council
at 7:30 o'clock at the Union this
evening. The purpose of this meet-
ing is to " instruct the new ofi-
cers in the various duties they will
have to perform and to set a time for
"Class Dues day," at which time all
class fees will be payable.
John W. Ross, '23E, treasurer of the
-Student council, will address the
meeting, speaking on co-operation be-
tween the different classes and the
council, especially regarding finances.
Other business of importance will be
discussed.
EMINENT EDITORS
SPEAKTOI GHT
Harrison of United Press, and Stace
of Grand Rapids Press, to
Talk to Press Club
INFORMAL DISCUSSION
PLANNED AFTER ADDRESSES
A. F. Harrison, manager of the Chi-
cago bureau of the United Press, and
Arthur W. Stace, managing editor of
the Grand Rapids Press, will be the
speakers at the Students' Press club
luncheon to be held at 6:15 o'clock
this evening in the Union.
Mr. Harrison's talk will deal with
the workings of a large news bureau,
while Mr. Stace, speaking on "Trou-
bles That Await the Cub," will pre-
sent the problems that confront the
school of journalism graduate when
he starts work on a city newspaper.
Following te talks, both speakers
will be ready to enter into an infor-
mal discussion with any students
who wish to ask them questions.
A buffet luncheon will be served
preceding the program. Tickets are
on sale at Wahr's, at the Union desk,
and in room 305, University hall.
Gargoyle, on Sale
Today, Features
SArtling C over
"The November Gargoyle is indu-
bitably, undeniably and irrefutably
'hot stuff', or to use the words of the
famous. Aristotle, it's the 'berries',"
said a prominent member of the rhet-
oric department when shown the
Football Number of Gargoyle which
makes its appearance on the campus
this morning.
A three color cover by Elmer G.
Wellin '23, depicts the futile, though
ill-conceived efforts of Omar the Cig-
arettemaker to stop the onrushes of
a flock of haremites. The debut of
"Louie the Lit" in the magazine this
month proves conclusively that Kip-
ling had no monopoly on that very
scarce article - knowledge of wom-
en, while the advice of the football
star on the proper method of using a
blanket at a game should prove help-
ful to those who take girls to the
game as well as those who do the
rooting.
"The Log of a Rum Runner," tells
graphically the perils encountered in
a voyage from Windsor to Detroit.
Lovers of the mysterious and Ec. 1
will find an intellectual treat in the
hair-raising experiences of the nefar-

sous Dr. FewKanchu.
Sport devotees will find much that
is edifying in the "Fake of the News,"
especially the article showing con-
clusively why Joe Gans and Jack
Dempsey should be brought together
at a very early date.
"Sweet Alice" and the "Charge of
the Bright Brigade" should satisfy
the most exacting lover of true poet-
ry, while "Hilduh," a French play in
five acts, is a delectable morsel for
those who have ever felt the cosmic
urge of the theater.

I

Ra4, fi

Michigan Professor Made Official
terpreter for Parley;
Leaves Today

In.

V rrr ra rr.rrw rrn

STUDENT BODY TENDERS RECEPTION
F ruHROBERT FROST, POET, TONIGHT

I

.

FRESH MEET SOPHS
IN FALL CONTESTS
Sophomores and freshmen will have
an opportunity to display the ability
of their respective classes when they
meet in the annual fall games next
Saturday morning. The games this
year will consist of the flag rush and
the cane spree, both of which won
great favor last year.
The activities will be supervised byl
the members of the Student council,!
and by "M" men, all of whom will be
on hand early to oversee the prepara-
tions. Arrangements for the games
are nearly complete now and the
committee in charge is planning to
have the classes meet some night this
week to elect captains and lieuten-
ants and to decide on plans of action.
CHOOSES TALAMON

Faculty Will Join in Welcome When
Line Forms at 8 O'clock in
Assemibly Hall
FIRST OFFICIAL AFFAIR
GIVEN PROMINENT VISITOR
Faculty and students from every
department in the University will be
given their first opportunity of the
year to meet Robert Frost, the New
England poet now living in Ann Ar-
bor, at a general public reception un-
der the auspices of the Union at 8
o'clock tonight in the assembly hall.
The line of faculty men and students
will form promptly at 8 o'clock and
the meeting will be over within an
hour, ending with a short informal
talk by Mr. Frost.

GREAT THRONG
C'HEERS TEAM AT
PEP MEETING
STUDENTS PACK AUDITORIUM TO
SHOW ENTHUSIASM FOR
WISCONSIN RESULT
MURPHY, '7, DECLARES
ALUMNI FOR YOST

All
wish

Committee in Charge
members of the University
to meet the poet will be

who
wel-

fu lledn

Washington, Nov. 14. - Peace be-
ween the United States and Germany
'as formally proclaimed today by
resident Harding.
The President, in a proclamation fil-
i at 3:53 p. m., declared that the
Late of war between the Uaited
tates and Germany, existing from
pril 6, 1917, to have terminated in
act July 2,-1921, when the joint peace
esolution, of congress was approved
y the executive.
TRYOUTS WANTED
Men wishing to try out for
the business side of Chimes
may apply from 2 to 5 o'clock
any afternoon this week at the
Press building.

coined, according to the Union recep-
tion committee, of which James G.
Frey, '22, is chairman. This is the
first large affair given officially by
any University organization in honor
of Mr. Frost, although a few recep-
tions have already been arranged by
smaller groups on the campus. The
meeting tonight will be altogether in-
formal in spirit, in accordance with
the wish of Mr. Frost.
A special gift to the University an-j
nounced last year by ex-Gov. Chase
S. Osborn has provided that the poet,'
who is 'recognized as among Ameri-
ca's leading literary men, should stay
in Ann Arbor for one year to meet
.he student body and influence it by
personal contact. The experiment is
a new one among American universi-
ties ,and will probably be continued
for some time if successful.
Welcomes Opportunity
In "commenting on the reception
yesterday, Mr. Frost said, "I will wel-
come this opportupity to meet the stu-
dents of the Uni'versity in an infor-
mal way, as I have been limited in my
acquaintanceships so far during my
stay here. There are a great many
men in various departments of thep
University that I have so far been
unable to meet and'I hope they will
appear at the reception tomorrow
night. I haven't the slightest idea of
what I will say at the meeting, but
I will be sincerely glad to form new
friendships among any University
men that care to be present."
It was hoped that President Marion
L. Burton would be able to attend the
reception, but he was forced to make
a trip to New York today that will
prevent his appearance. Mr. -Frost

will be introduced by R. Emerson
Swart, '22E, president of the Union.
Music will be provided during inter-
missions by a special orchestra.
FOUR MORE DAYS TO
SIGN UP FOR 'ENSIA N
PRICE REMAINS SAME AS LAST
YEAR, $5.50 CASH OR $6
IN PAYMENTS
More than 200 students signed up
for copies of the 1922 Michiganensian
during the first day of the five day
campaign for subscriptions. The sales-
men who got the largest number of
subscriptions are Nanette Carnahan,
'23, with 15 subscriptions; Elizabeth.
Forsyth, '23, with 13, and Douglas Se-
well, '24, with 11.
Salesmen will be stationed in the
corridor of University hall, in front
of the Library, in the Engineering
arch, and at the northwest corner of
the campus between the hours of 9
and 4 o'clock each day of the drive.
The same price is being charged
for the 1922 'Ensian as was charged
for last year's book, $5.50 being the
cash price, or $3.50 down and $2.50
upon receipt of the book.
Organizations' desiring Michiganen-
sians must sign up for them the same
as individuals. Many societies took it
for granted last year that they would.
receive copies of the book because
they had bought space in it.
TO MAIL TICKETS
TODAY FOR GAME
Student tickets for the Minnesota
game Saturday will be mailed today,
according to officials in the athletic
office who are in charge of the distri-
bution. Alumni tickets were mailed
( during the week-end, and the ~office
remained open until a late hour Sat-
urday night in order to get the tiek-
ets started on their way to those who
had sent in their orders.
At the present time all of the as-
signments of seats have been made,
and the tickets will be ready for the
mails this afternoon. The athletic
office was busy last night preparing
the tickets, and today will see the
work completed and the tickets ready
to be sent out.

ABSENCE UNTIL CHRISTMAS i
REQUIRED, HE BELIEVESi
Prof. Rene Talamon of the ro-
mance language department has been,
chosen official interpreter for theF
Armament conference and leaves Annc
Arbor for Washington this morning.i
Secures Leave of Absence t
A telegraph message was received1
yesterday noon by Professor Talamont
from John W. Garrett, secretary oft
the Conference on limitation of arm-
aments, asking whether he could leave
immediately for Washington as in-
terpreter at the Conference. After a.
meeting with President Marion L.
Burton, Professor Talamon secured a
leave of absence and wired his ac-
ceptance of the offer.c
In an interview late Monday aft-t
ernoon Professor Talamon said he
had no idea how long he would be ab-
sent but conjectured that it would beE
until Christmas. Mrs. Talamon willt
accompany him.t
An Experienced Man
Professor Talamon is eminently ex-z
perienced for the duties which he!
will assume, having acted as inter-
preter for the French government at
the Paris conference and was also in-E
terpreter at the American general1
headquarters at Chaumont, France,
from Oct. 1917, to Feb., 1919.t
Heth, '20, Tells
A bout PFaris In
November Chimes 1
Hardy Heth, '20, will tell about Eu-
ropean advertising in the November
issue of Chimes, out this week. Heth
is on the staff of the Chicago Trib-
une, Paris edition. The young man
interested in advertising will find
much of interest in the experiences of
this former Michigan man who has
not been out of school so long that he
cannot understand the problems of
the beginner in the field.
Prominent among the features of
Chimes this month is a symposium of
student opinion concerning the Yost
situation, which has been said to con-
tain the keenest analysis and clearest
thought of anything yet written upon
the subject, either here or elsewhere.
Captain Penberthy is the subject of
the cover, from an original photo-
graph by George Stone, photographic
editor of Chimes. James C. House,
Jr., '24L, art editor, has drawn -a por-
trait-frontispiece of Robert Frost,
which is accompanied by an interest-
ing article by Edwin R. Meiss,- '23,
concerning the poet.
The story of Cornell's athletic su-

Captain Dunne Says Wolverines Will
Retain Possession of Little
Brown Jug
Anxious. to show their appreciation
of the efforts of the team in battling
the powerful Badgers to a tie, more
than 4,000 students packed Hill audi-
torium last night and cheered the 1921
squad with songs .and yells.
Frank Murphy, '17, speaking for the
alumni asserted that in his opinion the
team today had brought more glory
to the University than any other team
in Michigan's history and that in the
game at Madison had showed more
fight and real football than any team
before it.
Murphy branded as unspeakable the
action of certain alumni groups who.
on the eve of the game with Wisconsin,
made sweeping attacks against the
team and the coach. "For every voice
which is raised against Yost there are
ten for him," he stated, "and there are
thousands of alumni throughout the
who believe and who ,always will be-
country who believe and who always
will believe that our coach Is the
greatest figure in athletics in the
country today."
Prof. John Parker, of the engi-
neering department, in a brief address
advised the student body to stick to
the team to the final whistle Saturday
and said that only those who were
willing to back their assertions to the
end were qualified to make accusa
tions concerning the team or any of
the coaches.
R. J. Dunne, '22, was called on for
a few words and promised that the
game with the Gophers would be a
real battle from start to finish with
each team fighting for the possession
of the little brown jug. Emerson
Swart, '22, was chairman of the meet-
ing and was assisted in conducting
the assembly by Al -_Cuthbert, '22E,
who led the cheers and the songs.
CHIMES' STORY CONTEST ENDS
TODAY; MORE STORIES NEEDED
Today is the last day that manu-
scripts may be handed in for the
Chimes' short story contest. Stories
must be between 1,000 and 3,000
words in length and must contain a
slip bearing the name, address and
telephone number of the author. .

premacy in cross-country events is PROF. RENE TALAMON, WHO HAS
told for the first time by C. C. Car- Been Chosen Interpreter for the
(Continued on Page Eight) Armament Conference.

1922

MICHIG ANENSIAN

1922

Opportunity is offered every Student to reserve his copy during the sub-
cription campaign this week, There will be no extra copies this year. The
1922 Michiganensian will be the most complete and elaborate yearbook
ever published. The more books sold the better the book will be. Every

student should have a Michiganensian for every year he's here.

Your only

chance to get a book this week.
upon receipt of copy.

Cash $5.50 or $3.50 down and $2.50
Five Thousand Copies Are Needed.

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