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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 05, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TR

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER CF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICIGAN
Puillshed every morning except Monday during the Univer.
ity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER-F THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
epublication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwi.e
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
lass matter.
Supscription by carrier' or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 960: Editorial. 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig.
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of~ events will be published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
Jnsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man
uscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex
>ressed in the communications.
"What's Going On" notices willnot be received after 6 o'clock
on the evening preceding insertion.

-w

EDITORIAL STAFF
Telepllone 2414

MANAGING EDITOR .......... BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
Assistant Managing Editor................Hugh W, flitchcock
City Editor...............................E. P. Lovejoy, Jr
Night' Editors-
M. B. Stahl G. P Overton
R. E. Adams Hughston Mc ain
Paul Watzel Edward Lambrecht
F. H. McPike
Editorials.,T. J Whinery, L. A. Kern. S. T. Beach., E. R. Meiss
Sunday Magazine Editor..........................T. S. Sargent
Sporting Editr ............................... George Reindel
Women's Editor............................ Elizabeth Vickery
Humor Editor....................v................. ER. Meiss
Assistants
Harry B. Grundy John Dawson Ben H. Lee, Jr
Wallace F. Elliott Sidney B. Coates Julian Mack
M. A. Klaver Lowell S. Kerr Howard Donahur
Dorothy Whipple H. E. FHowlett Arn~old Fleig
Marion Koch Katherine Montgomery
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER ............. VERNON F. HILLERY
Advertising .........................F. M. Heath. A. J. Paiker
Publication............................Nathan W.HRobertson
Accounts..... .......................... John J. Hamels, Jr.
Circulation............................... Herold C. Hunt
Assistants
Burr L. 'Robbins Richard Cutting H. Willis Heidbreder
W. Cooley James Prentiss W. Kenneth Galbraith
L. Beaumont Parks Maurice Moule J. A. Dryer
Walter Scherer :n Godring Richard Heidemann
Edw. .Mur~ne Tyler Stevens T. H. Wolfe

of the immediate jurisdiction of his studies, he vas-
cillates, and he is lost. Oh, not lost in the ordinary
sense of the word. But lost in that he has given
up the opportunity which his graduation speaker
pointed out to him.. of becoming a specialized,
college-bred man.
One hears so often from Sophomores, Juniors
and even Seniors "Oh, I'm sick of classes. I'm
getting nothing out of them." And in truth, they
are not - simply because they are putting nothing
into them. But there is a secret - the secret, if
you will, of an enjoyment of every moment of col-
lege life, and that is the awakening of a specialized
interest in some particular subject. There are some
of us who are born with that interest. Perhaps it is
books which appeal to us, perhaps it is political
economy - perhaps it is some other entirely differ-
ent subject - it makes no difference, but we feel
a keen interest in what we are learning - we de-
velop what is perhaps best described as a healthy,
intellectual curiosity and our research carries us
far beyond the scope of ordinary classroom assign-
ments tQ find out things for ourselves.
It is those students who have awakened in them-
selves or have found latent within them this same
interest that derive a real benefit from their college
courses. . When they leave school, it is not with the
feeling that their four years have been wasted. They
-have learned something - with no little pride they
feel themselves rather authorities on the subjects
which have caught their attention, and their pleas-
ure is a real one, born of the joy of specialization.
Counterfeit tickets are the latest acquisitions of
the ticket scalping fraternity, having been sold for
from five to twenty-five dollars apiece for the Wis-
consin-Minnesota game. Their advantage lies in
the thoroughness with which the victims are stung.
Judging from hearsay, all the letters home are
beginning to hint that blue-books are going up
again. It was bound to come, especially with
Christmas vacation drawing nearer and nearer.
Some seniors seem to be still holding out on the
'Ensian in the matter of having their pictures
taken. Only about two weeks more to be among
Whose Who!
It is a safe prediction that a certain number of
students going to Wisconsin next week will avoid
the city of Jackson.
Brush the cobwebs off that helmet, doughboy!
It's not so far off to the eleventh.

U'

__

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(La-stern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6.o5 a,
0.1 7:o5 a. m., 8:1o a. m. and hourly to 9:1o
p. M.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
*:bor), 9:48 a. in. and every two hours to
Q :48 p. Il
Local Cars East Bound-5.55 a.m., 7 :oo a.
in. and every two hours to 9:oo p. m.,. 1:o0
m To Ypsilanti only--1 1:o p. n., 12.25
a, m~ : I15 a. In.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:5o a. in., 2:40 p.
m.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars
<:48, 10:46 a. in., 12:48, 2:48, 4:48.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited: 8 :4F'
;, M.

'I

SNOW WILL BE HERE NEXT WEEK
Come down Liberty street hill and
Cet a good bargain in OIL STOVES
We give service for patronage
SCHLENKER'S HARDWARE
213-15 W. LIBERTY ST. "Out of the High Rent District" Phone 554

I

Log Log Slide Rules
AT
GRAHAtM'S
Bloth ends of the diagonal Avalk

I

".0

1921

6
13
20
27

7
14-
21
28

NOVEMBER
1 2 3
8 9 10
15 16 17
22 23 24
29 80

4
11
18
25

1921
6
12
19
26

rte:-- - -- -----

I-

Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for
Anyissuer of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full
charge of all news to be printed that night.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1921
Night Editor-J. P. DAVWSON, JR.
A LIVING TRIBUTE
Mute testimonials to the everlasting memory of
those who sacrificed their lives in the battles of the
Great War have found their place in every institu-
tion and community which contributed its sons to
the cause of democracy. Recently President Marion
L. Burton unveiled a tablet on Ferry field to the
gold star heroes of our own University. These are
worthy memorials and their graven eulogies will
pass on to posterity the story of America's sol-
diers. But tablets, statues, and architectural pieces
are mute, and their message is apt to be forgotten
in the absorbing rush of daily life.
The third anniversary of the signing of the Arm-
istice falls next Friday. At that time a living tes-
timonial to our soldier dead is to be held in Ann
Arbor, in the form of a parade in which men,
women and children will join reverently with the
ex-service men of the University and the city to
pay a tribute to those who died in the war. The
participators in such a ceremony will help keep
fresh in their own minds as well as in the minds
of others the memory of those who made the su-
preme sacrifice.
Last year 2,000 joined in the parade at Ann Ar-
bor, This Armistice day it is hoped to double that
number. Every ex-service man in the University
is urged to send home for his uniform and to help
make the parade a fitting tribute. It will require
comparatively little time and effort upon the part
of each man and will mean a great deal towards the
success of this living testimonial to Michigan's dead
heroes."
SPECIALIZATION
There is hardly a college student who does not,
at some time or other, recall the graduating address
delivered to his high school class. The scene ap-
pears in retrospect, to be a hot, squirmy one of try-
ing to appear at ease upon an elevated platform
with the faces of proud mothers and fathers gazing
rapturously upon the young hopefuls before them,
and immediately in front the speaker of the eve-
ning.
One does not hear a great deal of a graduating
address. It is always the same thing. There are
the compliments upon the appearance of the gradu-
ates, the talk of the hard road which has just been
traversed, and the exhortations to remember that we
are living in an age of specialization and that to-
day it is the college-bred man who will succeed in
the world.
Perhaps one does remember that last for just a
bit and the next fall enters college to receive the
training 'for the life-work which is ahead of him.
And in general, in direct ratio to the determination
which the lad has to follow in some fixed line of
endeavor are measured the results which he will
achieve. It is not to students of the professional
or vocational colleges that remarks such as these
need be addressed, but to those who have come to
the University, and have enrolled in the literary
college, simply to "get an education".
It is all so easy to come to college with a fixed
determination to get all that there is out of it -
sometimes that set purpose keeps the newcomer in
hand all through his freshman year. And then, as
a general rule, it becomes vague and indetermin-
ate. His interest centers upon endeavors outside

i

The tlelescope

To a "Made Up" Date
(With apologies to Edgar Allan Poe)
Once, while I was lonely grieving for a dance date
and believing
That a friend might make one for me, as I'd ne'er
made one before;
I proposed it, he consenting, asked a maiden unre-
lenting.
And I still was unrepenting, as I knocked thrice on
her door -
(E'er I'd left our room, my roommate, thinking of
a day of yore
Quoth, "Just once - and nevermore").
Hardly "Hello" could I utter, barely o'er this could
I stutter,
When I saw the apparition that was standing in the
door;
All details would be ungaining, so in silence sweet
restraining,
I'll omit the horrors paining of that evening on the
floor ;-
Later as I hobbled home and thought of what had
gone before,
Quoth I also, "Nevermore !"
-Vee Dee.
Statement in Michigan Daily: "The Ann Arbor
street car line commenced to run regularly in
1894."
Can someone please tell us when it stopped?
Quoth Eppie Taff:
Here lies a famous acrobat
Who got in Dutch,
He gave his trapeze act
just once too much.
Our Freshman Friend
When he first arrived here was rather half-baked,
but now he seems to have too much crust.
The Worm Turneth
"I'm on my guard," is usually
A rift in clouds that are black,
But not when it means that a prisoner
Has hopped on his sentinel's back.
-Cicero.

NOTICE TO MEN
lWe do all kinds of Ilil-cuass Hat
work at pre-war prices. Hats turned
inside out, with all new trimming-%.
are as good as new.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792
STUDENTS LUNCH
409 EAST JEFFERSON
OPEN 6:30 A. M.
TILL 11:00 P. M.
THE
SCHOOL
PREMIER
ANN ARBOR'S
MOST
Beautiful and Refined
DANCE STUDIOS
WE TEACH ALL BRANCHES
OF
DANCING
BALLET, TOE, SOFT
SHOE
CHILDREN'S CLASS
Saturdays: 24
BALLROOM DANCING
EVERY DAY BY APPOINT-
MENT
Hours: 1-5, 7-10
WUERTH ARC4Dt

of Advertising

:Free Delivery
eY
For every order of 50c or over
from 7.30 A. M. until 1A. M.
208-M CALL 208-M
BARNEY'S PLACE
For
KOSHER DELICATESSEN SANDWICHES
Cigars Cigarettes Candies Soft Drinks Fruits
N. B. Pkg. Biscuits
640 Haven, behind Martha Cook
When You Become a
Conscious Reader

Via-...

g'L

i

By J. R. HAMILTON
Former Advertising Manager of Wanamaker', Philadephi

1

I

THE
PRUNER
COAL
COMPANY
INCORPORATED
WE SELL ONLY
HIGHEST QUALITY
COALS
BITUMINOUS-
Genuine Pocahontas
West Virginia White Ash
Genuine Hocking, Ohio
Highest Grade Kentucky
ANTHRACITE--
Genuine Scranton White
Ash
Upper Lehigh Valley
COKE-
Genuine Solvay
GUARANTEED WEIGHT AND
SERVICE
OFFICE-
124 EAST HURON STREET
Phone 1950-Fl

When you learn to read your advertising as you read you
news, the cost of everything you wear or use is going to be owered
for you.
If you knew how much money it takes to soak an idea into
your mind subconsciously you would be ashamed of your mind.
It actually takes as long as two years sometimes to get you t
think and say a certain word.
It's like teaching a baby to talk.
Every known trick of psychology is brought to bear on you.;
Advertisers have even been known to print their advertisement
upside down, hoping, perhaps, that if you had to stand on your
head to read it you might remember what they say.
And what you so often refuse to receive with your will the
camera of your eye records in spite of you. So that 96% of what
you buy you buy through advertising whether you know it or not.
And yet, in the face of all this, the advertising method of
selling things is twenty times cheaper than any other method
known.
Think how much cheaper still it would be if you would only
read your advertising consciously instead of buying through it
in spite of yourself.
The merchant who doesn't advertise hasn't even a chance
with the one who does:
Your eye is taking photographs every time you turn these
pages. You couldn't get away from these advertisements if you
tried. Even the man who claims not to see them at all is record-
ing them all the time. Every merchant who appears here is
telling you his story every day whether you know it or not.
All we are trying to do is to make you conscious readers of
advertising instead of subconscious readers. -This is being done
equally for your benefit and for ours.
Every time you look for the advertising in this paper instead
of making it look for you you bring down your cost of living, you
increase the buying power of your money and you get a better
quality for the price. This is true because the men who advertise
are always the best merchants. They are the ones who last. The
others flicker up for a little while and then go out. That's the
proof.
On the other hand, every time we get a hundred more of
our readers to turn each day with a conscious mind to the adver-
tising news as well as to the general news, we make this a better
medium for our advertisers. We give them more for their money
because we give them your will.
And before we are through every subscriber we have will be
reading his advertising consciously day by day-never fear. For
this is another psychological law.
(copyghted.)

I

Ann Arbor Daze:
five minutes after the alarm

The first
sounded.

clock has

Song of the Immortals
Our utmost admiration
He has, we must confess,
Who does all to moderation
And nothing to excess.
Famous Closing Lines'
"The Michigan line is poor," said the Ann Arbor
student as his pleadings failed to gain a date with
the Ypsi girl. ERM.

I

,,_

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