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November 05, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-05

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THE WEATHER,
CLOUDY AND COOLER
TODAY

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ASSOCIATI
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

VOL. XXXI. No. 36.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1921

PRICE FF

_.

SENITE REORDERS
INVESTIATION OF
A E F. F H NGINGS'
COMMITTEE MEETS MONDAY FOR
DETERMINAtION OF BEST
PROCEDURE
WAR DEPARTMENT GIVES
INQUIRY FULL SUPPORT
"Blot on Good Name of the Army,"
Unless Inquisition Is
Carried Out
(By A4sociated Press)
Washington; Nov. 4. - Investigation
by a special senate comiittee of the
charges of Senator Watson, Democrat,
Georgia, that American soldiers in
France were hanged without trial and
shot by officers' orders was adjourned
today when the senate after three
hours' discussion unanimously reor-
dered the inquiry.
The special committee, headed by
Seator Brandegee, Republican, Con-
necticut, will meet next Monday to
determine upon procedure, but it is ex-
pected that several days will elapse
before hearings are begun, while
Senator Watson is gathering his evi-
dence.
The war department is preparing to
give'its fullest support to the senate
investigation, taking the position that
the accusations of the Georgia sen-
ator constitute a blot on the good
name of the army unless a furiln-
vestigation is held. Secretary Weeks
has said that he hopes the inquiry
is carried out until all the facts have
been established, and is understood
to hive offered to put at the disposal
of the committee the facilties of the
army in arriving at the truth.
FACULTY SURVEY
NOT DUE TO OWN
LIVING COSTS
Mere desire on the part of members
of the faculty to reduce their own liv-
ing expenses in no way influenced the
deans in their decision to appoint a
committee to investigate living costs
in Ann Arbor, it was affirmed by an
administrative officer of the Univer-
sity yesterday.
Such an investigation has - been
made necessary by several facts, the
University official stated. "Letters are
received daily," he said, "from men
out in the state who are merchants
or farmers themselves, complaining
that they are no longer able to send
their sons and daughters to their own
state university. They claim that
living costs in Ann Arbor are so much
in advance of those in the towns
where smaller colleges ar located
that they are being forced to send
these young men and women to the
small schools. These men cannot un-
derstand this fact, and are accusing
the University of becoming 'not a
poor man's college but a rich man's
school'.
"In addition to this, there have been
numerous students who have entered
the University and have been forced
to withdraw because it cost them too
much to live in Ann Arbor. Also, nu-
merous persons who came here with

the intention of registering as stu-
dents left without doing so, since they
realized that they would be unable to
meet their expenses here.
"It is because of a desire to get to
the bottom of these existing condi-
tions that' the deans appointed their
committee," he stated in conclusion.
-layers To Give
ef
Program Nov. 17
"The Florist Shop" by the Harvard
47 Workshop, and "The Lost Silk
Hat" by Lord Dunsany will make up
the next program to be Tresented by
the Players club on Wednesday eve-
ning, Nov. 17, at Sarah Caswell An-
gell hall. "The Florist Shop" will be
directed by Jackson L. Rosecrance,
'22, and "The Lost Silk Hat" by Wen-
dell Hanselman, '23. In adidtione to
the two plays there will be a short
musical program.

WISCONSIN SEATS
GO ON SALE TODAY
Tickets for the Wisconsin game at
Madison a week from today will be
placed 'on sale at the Athletic office
this morning.
One thousand seats in a block near
the center of the field have been re-
served for the Michigan rooters. They
will be sold here at $3, the same price
which they would command at Madi-
son.
No reservations wiU be made by the
Athletic association , and a pol-
icy of "first come, first served" will
be followed in disposing of the paste-
boards.
UNION LIFE MEMBERSHIP
DRIVE.TRTS TUESDAY
CAMPAIGN GOAL SET IT 1,600;
WOULD INCREASE FUNDS
BY $80,000
With all preparations concluded for
what promises to result in a success-
ful campaign, the Union life member-
ship committee will start next Tues-
day morning toward the attainment of
its goal of 1,600 new life members.
The chairman and captain of the com-
mittee are confident of reaching this
quota because of the precedent which
has been established by previous suc-
cessful campaigns.
Last year with a goal of 2,500 new
members the committee finished the
drive with returns which more than
covered their quota, having added
2,506 new names to the life member-
ship roll of the Union. The drive
netted the Union $125,000, which,
when paid in, will be added to the
building fund. This year's drive will
swell this fund by approximately
$80,000.
The-entire committee will meet at
8:30 o'clock Tuesday night in the as-
sembly hall of the Union for a final
discussion of campaign methods, and
the complete lists of men to be so-
licited will be given to committee
members. The meeting will conclude
only such business as is deemed ab-
solutely necessary for the opening of
the campaign, and will adjourn
promptly at 9:30 o'clock.
According to Maynard A. Newton,
'22, general chairman of the commit-
tee, two necessary changes have been
made in the personnel of the team
captains, Sigmund Kundstadter, '22,
replacing George W. Fiske,'Jr., '23E,
and Ross Riford, '23, being replaced
-by Charles E. Shearer, '24.
SPARGO CANCELS
ENGAGEMENT HERE
Illness Prevents Lecture Promised for
November 10
John Spargo, the noted Socialist
speaker, who was to fill a lecture en-
gagement in this city on Nov. 10, is
seriously ill and will be unable to
fill his engagement, according to a
telegram from Washington, D. C., re-
ceived here yesterday.
The series of eight lectures will be
opened on Nov. 18 by Charles Rann
Kennedy, author of "The Servant in
the House," and Edith Wynne Matthi-
son (Mrs. Kennedy). They will pre-
sent scenes from the drama.
Mr. Spargo's lecture was to have
opened the series of lectures offered
by the Oratorical association for this

winter, on Oct. 28. He was forced to
postpone the first date after being
called to Washington by government
officials for conference on the impend-
ing railroad strike.
Concerning the unfulfilled engage-
ment, Prof. Thomas C. Trueblood, of
the public speaking department, stat-
ed yesterday, "We are exerting every
effort to replace the Spargo lecture
date some time during the series by
some speaker of equal importance. So
far no- speaker has been definitely en-
gaged."
Entertainment in Tap Room Tonight
Music and entertainment will be
provided for the student body between
10:15 and 12 o'clock tonight in the tap
room of the Union. Popular songs and
the better known Michigan songs will
be included in the program, which
will be in the nature of a general get-
together affair. The entertainment
committee of the Union is in charge of
arrangements.

MADISON SPECfI
TRAIN IS SECURE D
Will Leave Ann Arbor at 9 O'clock on
Evening Preceding Badger
Game
ROUND TRIP FARE IS $19.74;
STOP OVER RIGHTS GRANTED
Michigan rooters will have the op-
portunity of following the team to
Madison on Nov. 12, by a special train
as complete as that which was made
up for the Illinois game last Satur-
day.
The train will leave Ann Arbor at
9 o'clock on the evening before the
game and arrive in Madison at 8
o'clock Saturday morning. At 11
o'clock the trip home will begin, the
train arriving in Ann Arbor at 9
o'clock Sunday morning. The stay
over privilege will be granted as it
was on the Urbana trip. Anyone wish-
ing to do so may stay in Madison or
in Chicago over Sunday, providing
that he leaves Chicago on the 12:.05
o'clock train out of Chicago Sunday
night, which arrives in Ann Arbor at
7 o'clock Monday morning.
Rates Higher
The round trip fare will be $19.74,
$4.86 for a lower Pullman berth, $3.89
for an upper berth, and $17.82 for a
drawing room. These special rates
are not as low, comparatively speak-
ing, as were those to Urbana and this
is explained by the fact that the roads
over which the Illinois special trav-
elled are controlled by the Central
Passenger association. This body some
time ago passed a ruling that any road
within its jurisdiction or roads within
its boundaries might on the day of a
football game offer a one way fare for
the round trip between any two col-
lege towns on its routes.
Madison, however, is reached by
roads which are controlled by the
Western Passenger association, which
has never offered any such concession
to football trains, and for this reason
the one way fare could not be ob-
tained. The 1,000 Minnesota rooters
who saw the Wisconsin-Minnesota
football game in Madison last Satur-
day were compelled to pay full fare
each way on the trip.
Tickets on Sale Monday
Tickets will be on sale any time aft-
er Sunday at the Michigan Central
station or may be purchased at the
main desk in the Union between 2
and 8 o'clock next Tuesday after-
noon and evening. Pullman reserva-
tions may be made at the same time.
In order that sufficient accommoda-
tions may be provided it is necessary
that everyone who is planning to
make the trip should purchase tickets
as soon as possible. The slight con-
gestion in the day coaches on the
Illinois train was due to the fact that
many men neglected purchasing tick-
ets until the last moment.
HOLMES TO SPEAK T
UNION SUNDAY SERICE
NEW UNIVERSITY CHOIR UNDER
BOWEN TO MAKE INITIAL
APPEARANCE
President Arthur Holmes of Drake
university, Des Moines, Ia., will be
the principal speaker at the services
in Hill auditorium Sunday night. Hi
subject will be, "A Religious Educa-

tion." President Holmes, who was
formerly professor of psychology at
the University of Pennsylvania, and
later dean at Pennsylvania State uni-
versity, is the author of several
books, "The Decay of Rationalism",
"The Conservation of the Child", "The
Principle of Character Making",
"Backward Children", and others.
The services Sunday evening will
begin at 7 o'clock. Emerson Swart,
'22E, will be the presiding officer and
Rev. J. B. Silcox of the Congregation-
al church will conduct the scripture
and prayer service. The new Univer-
sity choir under George Oscar Bowen
will make its first appearance at this
service. The musical numbers will
be announced Sunday morning.
To Address Armistice Meeting
Prof. W. D. Henderson, of the Ex-
tension division, will address a union
armistice meeting in the opera house
at Milan Sunday evening.

Capacity For Self-Government Is
Shown Through Advisory Committee

(By Frank Brown)
Six or seven months ago credit was
given Dean Bursley for saying that the
student body of Michigan was capable
of self-government. That statement
marked as legitimate the plans then
being formulated for a committee
which would serve as a go-between and
bridge over the gap separating the
student body and the faculty. The idea
was worked into a concrete form and
the result presented to the faculty for
consideration and to the student body
for their vote. It met with approval
from almost every source and on
March 16, 1921, the Student Advisory
DETROIT MEN ARRANGE
JONT SMOKER NOTI 12

WISCONSIN,
WILL

MICHIGAN ALUMNI
HEAR RETURNS

TOGETHER

Wisconsin and Michigan alumni and
undergraduates will meet under a
common flag at a Michigan-Wisconsin
football smoker to be held at 2:30
o'clock Saturday afternoon, Nov. 12,
in the Elks' temple of Detroit under
the auspices of the University of
Michigan club.
The entertainment will start with a
moving picture of the Michigan-Ohio
State game of two weeks ago. A min-
iature gridiron will then be set up
and the returns of the football game
at Madison announced play by play.
The scores of the other big games
will also be received and announced.
Smokes, doughnuts, and cider will
be supplied throughout the after-
noon. A Michigan jazz orchestra will
furnish music during those spare mo-
ments when the returns of the game
lag. One of the Varsity cheerleaders
has been procured to lead the cheers.
Alumni, undergraduates, and foot-
ball enthusiasts are invited to be pres-
ent. Tickets are $1.
LOCATIONS FOR
NEW CLEMENTS
LIBRARY STAKED
Several possible locations for the
new Clements library were staked off
by the buildings and grounds commit-
tee yesterday opposite Martha Cook
dormitory and to the east of the
President's home. It is expected that
Regent W. L. Clements will be in
Ann Arbor some day next week to se-
lect one of these sites.
The possible sites for the new
building vary only by a few feet and
differ only in respect to the position
of the structure and its setting among
the other buildings in that part of the1
campus.
Plans for the new library are not
yet in final form, the architects hav-
ing made numerous small changes in
order better to meet the needs and
requirements for the housing of the
Clements collection. The structure
will be of stone finish and the total
cost of con'struction will approximate
$175,000. Ground will be broken for
the new building in about a week aft-
er the site is approved by Regent
Clements. Part of the old engineer-
ing building will also have to be torn
away in order to make room for the
structure.
'3 DENTS PLAN MEMORIAL
Flag Poles. May Be Erected Before
Union Front Entrance
Tentative plans for the erection of
two memorial flag poles at the front
entrance of the Union are being con-
sidered by. the dentistry class of '23.
The ploes are to have iron bases
18 feet high and are to be similar in
design to the lamp posts along the
Union entrance. When opposing ath-
letic teams are in Ann Arbor it is
planned to fly the University colors
from one pole and those of the visit-
ing team from the other.
a Actual plans for the presentation
have not yet been completed. The blue
print drawings of the poles are on ex-
hibition in the entrance of the Dental
building.-

committee became a part of the Mich-
igan campus.
The mechanism of the committee is
well designed. It has bdth junior and
senior members, so that at no time is
there a complete re-election of con-
stituents. It is becoming more and
more evident that the committee needs
the full time of its active members
and its growing importance would
seem to indicate that in the
future it will demand this of the men
who are elected to the committee.
There are also ex-officio members, thei
president of tle Student council, the
president of the Union, and the man-
aging editor of The Daily. The ad-
vantage of having these men is self-
evident-they are the ones mqst apt
to be in touch with the whole cam-
pus.
The advisory committee concerns '
itself largely with the students, serv-
ing as a two-way bumper between the
student body and the faculty. It is in
this respect nearly analogous to the'
engineers' honor committee. It hears
complaints of students and in the case
of student offenders it recommends
that action be taken. It is not the
purpose of the committee to enforce
petty rules, but if the need presents
itself it will be instrumental in dis-;
covering the more important violations
that injure Michigan's name. Had this
committee been in existence last spring
at the time the 3-Hop was called off
it might have submitted some solution.
In fact, the Student Advisory commit-
tee grew out of the unrest caused by
the abandonment of the Hop. Thisj
year it is our greatest asset with which
to ,bring about the reinstatement of,
Michigan's most imp'ortant social func-
tion. If it succeeds in presenting the
feeling of the student body to the prop-j
er authorities, we can at least have
reasonable hopes for the return of the
long lamented Hop.
WINNING POSTER CHOSEN
FOR FALL GLEE CONCERT
DEWEY, '923, NAMED ASSISTANT
MANAGER; WATZEL, '23,
PUBLICITY HEAD
Gordon F. Godley, '22E, manager of
the Varsity Glee and Mandolin clubs
announced yesterday that the poster
for this fall's concert has been decid-
ed upon and that it will be displayed
in a State street book store window
next Tuesday. The one chosen was
made by Clayton Seagears, '23, and .is
in two colors. The one considered
next best by the committee was the
work of Bruce C. Davis, '25A. Sea-
gears' poster will be used both to an-
nounce the concert and as a cover for'
the progran.
More than one assistant manager
for the club had not been chosen un-
til yesterday, when Thomas E.
Dewey, '23, former publicity commit-
tee chairman, was named as anoth-l
er assistant, leaving but one more to.
be selected. Paul E. Watzel, '23, has
been appointed to fill the vacancy left
by Dewey as chairman of the public-1
ity committee.9
Although"the Glee club is complete
and regular rehearsals are being held
in preparation for the many events1
on the club's schedule, enough man-
dolin players have -not yet been se-
cured, according to Godley, who asks
that any players of this instrument
who are eligible for campus activi-
ties call him at 1605.1
CITY DE MOLAYS WILL SEE
DETROIT CHAPTER FOUNDED

Ann Arbor chapter of the Order of
De Molay will leave on a special in-
terilrban car for Detroit at 10 o'clock
this morning, where they will wit-
ness the installation of the Detroit,
chapter. The installation ceremony
will be put on by the officers of the
mother chapter at Kansas City, Mo.
Master Masons of Ann Arbor are in-
vited to make the trip with the De Mo-
lays on their special train this morn-
ing.
The special will leave Detroit at 12
o'clock tonight, Detroit time.
The Ann Arbor railroad ran a spec-
ial theater excursion to Toledo one
Friday night in '96. The round trip
rate was 75 cents.

HARDNG PPOINT!ct
10ADVSERS FO
CONFERENCE HEl
AMERICAN "BIG FOUR" AsSIS
AT DISARMAMENT MEET.
ING
TO BE ASSEMBLED 3
DAYS BEFORE OPENIR
Committee Members Given Spe
Commissions to Insure High
Ranking
(By Associated Press)
Washington, D. C., Nov. 4.-The
visory committee of 21 selected
President Harding to act with the .
erican big four at the disarmami
conference will be assembled in W
ington three days in advance of
conference opening to give its opi
on the initial steps of the policie
be taken by this government.
A call for a meeting of the com
tee next Wednesday, Nov. 9, wadi
sued today by Secretary Huges
at the same time it was revealed,
high officials expect the commi
members to play an influential pa
shaping the government's cause I
the beginning to the end of the Ae
tiations.
It is assumed that at the first ni
ing the committee wouldbe #dv
fully of the plans for armament rei
tion drawn up by the four princ
delegates, and in ited to make aug
tions on every pertinent subjedt.
the negotiations develop it is expe
by administration officials that the
visory body will be asked to giv
verdict on' every point of major
portance.
A "reaction agency" was the
the committee was described in b
official circles today to illustrate
extent to which it will function i
fiecting public opinion on the probi
that come before the conference.
Although the committee memi
unlike the four principals, will 1
no diplomatic standing, a special c
mission for each was signed toda
President Harding authorizing the
"advise and assist" in shaping the
erican policy.
NoT.115 FINAL DAT
FOR CHIMES CONTE
Although but few stories have I
turned in so far for the Chimes' s
story contest, it is expected that
year's quota of 50 stories will 'e
done, according to those in charg
the contest.
"It was during the last two day
the contest last year that the ma
ity of stories were turned in,"
F. M. Smith, '22, managing ed
"and it is to be expected that mos
the stories which are contributed
year will come in on Nov. 15,
final date for the receipt of m
scripts."
Printed in December
The story winning first prize .
be printed in the December issu
Chimes and others considered wo
will run in later numbers. Last
Chimes printed five of the atl
that were submitted.

Chimes has laid down the fol
ing rules regarding the contest:
stories shall be between one and t'
thousand words .in length, choic
subject being left to the author. V
each manuscript should be a sll
paper on which is typewritten
name, address, and phone numbe
the writer and the name of the si
The name of the writer will n~ot
pear on any page of the story, so
the judges will not know whose a
they are judging. The contribul
must be typewritten, doublesa
and in good readable condition.
Jndged on Genera Interest
"The stories will be judged,"
Smith, "not alone on their lite
style but principally on their gen
readability, human interest,
adaptability to campus readers.
we'are turning all manuscripts w
ceive over to The Daily Su
Magazine short story contest, I
sending in stories have a chant
win both prizes."

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