100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 01, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, NOVIh

{ t*
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
Pulshed every mnorning except Monday during the Univer.-
sity year by the Board in Control of Student Publcations.n
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
Srepublcation of all news di atches credited to it or not otherwise
ecredited in this paper and te local news published therein.
.Entered. at the postofce at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
lass matter.
Sunscription by carrier or mail, 13.o
Of*ices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 46o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
fith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration.. No man-
uscrit will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
pressed in the communications.
"What's Going On" notices will not be received after 6 o'clock
on the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR ..........BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
Assistant Managing Editor..................Hugh W. Hitchcock
City Editor ............................... P. Lovejoy, Jr.
Night Editors-
M. B. StahlG. P. Overton
R. E. Adams Hughston McBain
Paul Watzel Edward Lambrecht
F. H. McPike
Editorials..T. J. Whinery, L. A. Kern, S. T. Beach, E. R. Meiss
Sunday Magazine Editor ..........................T. S. Sargent
Sporting Editor ............................... George Reindel
Women's Editor ............................. Elizabeth Vickery
Humor Editor .................................... E R. Meis
Assistants
Harry B. Grundy John Dawson Ben H. Lee, Jr.
Wallace F. Elliott Sidney B. Coates Julian Mack
M A. Kaver I~welS Kerr Howard Donahue
Dorothy Whipple H. E. Howlett Arold hleig
Marion Koch Katherine Montgomery
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER ............. VERNON F. HILLERY
Advertising............ ...........F. M. Heath, A. J. Parker
Publication...........................Nathan W. Robertson
Acconts-.......... ...... ................. John J. II amels. Jr.
Circulation .....,.........................Herold C. Hunt
Assistants
Burr L. Robbins Richard Cutting H. Willis Heidbreder
W. Cooley James Prentiss W. Kenneth Galbraith
L. Beaumont Parks Maurice Moule J. A. Dryer
Walter Scherer Martin Goldring Richard Heidemann
Edw. Murane Tyler Stevens T. H. Wolfe
Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for
any issue of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full
charge of all news to be printed that night.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1921
Night Editor-HUGHSTON M. McBAIN
The entire Cubs club will Meet at 4 o'clock this
afternoon.
IT'S STILL THERE - THAT REAL SPIRIT
"There never was such a spirit." The whole
Michigan team agreed that no human heart could
fail to respond to the undying enthusiasm and in-
spiring encouragement which six hundred Michigan
men and women afforded their football eleven at
Urbana last Saturday. Even the elements retreated
before the ardor of the Ann Arbor rooters. A
threatening rain dried up upon their arrival and
hesitated to return until it was time to shed tears
for Illinois.
The cluster of Michigan backers showed a real
spirit of "do or die" fight, and they gave unspar-
ingly of lusty lungs which sent "that funny thrill"
so well described by Shorty Longman up and down
$he back of each of the players in the blue jerseys
and urged them on to an expenditure of energy
unsurpassed in gridiron contests.
Some will say that the cheering was good be-
cause only. the really whole-hearted Michigan men
and women took the trip to Urbana. Perhaps. And
the team followers root better on a foreign field
than on their own grounds. Maybe. But regard-
les of these arguments, the Michigan team last Sat-
urday was in a sense morally forced to achieve vic-
tory for their school at home. to be sure, and for
their coach on the field, but most of all repay those
six hundred rooters who backed them in the battle,
and who cheered and exhorted and urged and
pleaded until their voices broke, and then waved
and cheered some more.
The fact remains that the man behind the team

does in a large measure win football games, that an
eleven upon a foundation of solid loyalty, no mat-
ter how crippled it may be, is more effective than
a perfected machine dependent upon the shaky sup-
port of a half-hearted student body.
The spirit shown at Urbana cannot be the spirit
of a faithful few. It is, we are confident, the re-
flection of a Michigan spirit embodying the whole
University, a spirit which withholds no ounce of
energy in the directing of its team towards victory;
it is the unconquerable loyalty which wins out
against all odds; and it is the dauntless faith which
will again bring Michigan the championship of the
West.
LATENT ABILITY
When calls for tryouts come from various col-
lege activities there are always a certain number of
individuals with no experience who feel that they
have no chance and say, "Well I would like to go
out for that but I know I could never do any-
thing." Consequently they don't even try.
But consider the number of novices who have
proved "discoveries" in the realm of sport alone.
Chute, Michigan's best cross country runner this
year, came out last year "just for the exercise".
Freeborn, who is not at Michigan this year, came
out wth Chute and the fiirst year he was out he won
the Harphan trophy race. Hap Hoff, record holder
of the University for the quarter mile, and winner
of the Eastern Intercollegiate 4:40, never thought
he had an ability as a runner. Hoffman never saw
a javelin until two years ago. His first year of
competition he broke the Western Conference rec-

Johnny Garrels, one of the world's best, who
starred at both end and fullback, attracted no at-
tention his first and second years. In fact it is said
people used to wonder at his stick-to-it-iveness in
going out for football when it was so "hopeless".
Yet his last two years he whipped the best of
them. It was this same Johnny Garrels whose best
record in track his first year was 52 seconds for
the quarter-mile. Yet Garrels ended up by having
an even greater reputation in track than he had in
football. He won the World's record in the dis-
cus, beat all comers in the high hurdles, and was
beaten by only six inches in the hurdles at the 1912
Olympic games at Antwerp.
Tommy Hughitt, was a little runt who failed to
make even the freshman team, yet he later became
one of the best quarterbacks Michigan ever had. .
Ned Kellogg, now athletic director at Purdue,
never ran a race until Keene Fitzpatrick, now
Princeton mentor, noticed him running around the
gymnasium track and induced him to try out for the
team. It is athletic history that Kellogg won the
Intercollegiate two-mile event his first year!
Even the world-famous "Germany" Schulz, per-
haps the greatest individual star ever turned out at
Michigan, conceded by all to be the All-Time. All-
American center, did not regularly make the team
until the last game or two of the year.
While we cannot all be world-famous athletes,
how many Kelloggs or Garrels are there among us,
who, like them, do not realize their possibilities?
And how can one find out except by trying out?
Whether you believe you will ever be a phenom-
enal success or not, go out for activities, whether
it be football, literary work, or even "politics". You
have nothing to lose and you may win great suc-
cess. The least you can get out of it is inestimable
benefit from contact with people,r and your own ef-
forts to. achieve will fit you fot the greater tasks
which await you after college days are over.
So whether you consider yourself a genius or
not - at least try. You can lose nothing and you
may gain much.
FOLLOW THEIR EXAMPLE
Evidence that the hard feeling which has too
often showed itself during the athletic relationship
between Illinois and Michigan in the past few years
is at end was seen in the welcome which was given
to the men and women of this University who went
to Champaign last week end. No effort was spared
by the Illinois students to make them feel at home
during their short sojourn.,
This type of friendly spirit should continue to
exist between the two schools. Athletic contests
with Illinois are always hard fought. It is an honor
to win from an orange and blue team. But the will
to be victorious ought not to be carried to the ex-
'tent of being harmful to the good name of either
university. Illinois has started the year off right.
Michigan must follow the example of her neighbor.
It is to the mutual benefit of both schools that the
friendly spirit should continue.
The Teeleope
The Vendor
The Curfew tolls the knell of parting day,
The lowing herd into the Union stray,
The popcorn vendor wends his weary way
Home to his wife; Oh what will wifey say?
What will she say to him who as he vends
He bends and his new pants he rends,
Or woe to fate which such ill fortune sends,
From wifey's wrath no shield on earth defends.
The popcorn vendor stands all night and vends
No more at end of day he homeward wends
For he must vend to earn that which he spends
In his distended pants to mend the rends.
It is rumored that Centre will remove Harvard
from her schedule next year. - A. Press.
Quoth Eppie Taf:
He left us sudden

Did Henry Mole,
He stepped into
A sewer hole.
-D'ing.
The Psychology of Advertising
"The Perfection Sledgehammer."
(Take this home and try it on your piano.)
My Freshman Friend
Asked me what archaeoligist unearthed the speci-
mm we call West Hall. - Soccertes.
The Saw-Test
"My love is like the sturdy oak,"
To say that was a snap,
But she found out in course of time
He was an awful sap.
The Flapper-Will you please play "Sally Come
Back" I just love that.
The Saxaophone-I'm sorry, but our drummer
doesn't know that piece, and he isn't here tonight so
we can't play it.
A football's made of pigskin
So I've been 'told,
And yet in every touchdown
The ball is gold.
Famous Closing Lines
"There remains only one course for me to fol-
low," said the captain of the canal barge.
x: M

Log Log Slide Rules

AT

GRAHAM'S.
Both ends of the diagonal b'alk

III

. J

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6.o a.
M., 7:05 a. in., 8:io a. m. and hourly to 9:10
p. in.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
Arbor), 9:48 a. in. and every two hours to
9:48 p. in..
Local Cars East Bound--5: 5 a.m., 7:oo a,
in. and every two hours, to 9 :oo p. in., i z :oo
p. m. To Ypsilanti only-u :4o p. in., 12.25
a. in., 1:15 a. in.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7 :so a. in., 2:40 p.
in.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars:
8:48, 10:48 a. m., 12:48, 2:48, 4:48.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited: 8:48
P. in.
1921 NOVEMBER 1921
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30
NOTICE TO MEN
We do all kinds of high-class Hat
work at pre-war prices. Hats turned
inside out, with all new trimmings,
are as good as new.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792
tff Spa'din
for Sport
Whether you play foot ball,
basket ball, or indulge in
any athletic sport, Spalding
implements will give most
satisfaction.
Send for catafogiue
A. G. SPALDING & BROS.
211 So. State St., Chicago
SLEEP ANYWHERE, BUT
EAT AT REX'S
THE CLUB LUNCH
712 Arbor Street
Near State and Packard Streets
aU

R16

11

"AFTER
EVERY
mlM EAL.

WRIGLEYS
Newest
Creation
-f1
5 c
A dellou
peppermin
::. flavored sua
- ,. iacket around Pei
permint flavored chew
Will aid Your appetI1
and digestion, polls
.. Your teeth and moiste
Your throat, B129
*WGLEY -

is
it
b
U
.

B2ack t
We are now selling Ea-
ton's Highland Linen at 50
cents a quire box. The same
high quality is strictly main-
tained at the new low price.
Select your favorite from our
displays of the newest shapes
and tints.
0. D. MORRILL
17 NICKELS ARCADE

The Flavor Lasts

MOVED TO OUR NEW LOCATION
320 East Liberty Street

I

LAFDER
FOR
L OW ER

I

I

Get 'em from 0 & H
Men's
Shoe Shop

See what $8.50 will buy

\ ' \ .a \
'U0O
u Q .. D 0-9o P
'~"'O G
Pa GO

AT

Our
Christmas
Stationery
and
Greeting
Cards
are now on
display.

THE
O&H
SHOP

Engraving and Embossing
orders should be placed now
to avoid possible delays.

$8.50 will buy a Norwegian or Scotch grain oxford in
black or brown - new square toe - soft or hard too
with heavy single soles. Snappy patterns and serv-
iceable merchandise, at a price.
O'KANE & HERTLER
335 SOUTH MAIN STREET
"Quality Footwear at a price"

I

J

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan