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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 01, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-11-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
UNSETTLED; PROBABLY
RAIN TODAY

CJ

liitr i~au

4]&zi1U

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AlD NIGHT WIl
SERVICE

VOL. 'XXXII. No. 32. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1921 PRICE FIVE Cr

LESTER* SECUREID
AS COSTu1MER FUR'
MAKE IT. FOR TWO'
HAS NEVER TAKEN OVER WORK
OF AN AMATEUR PRODUC-
TION BEFORE
OFFERS $1,000 FOR ANY
WARDROBE DUPLICATE

LAST SUMMER SAW COLLECTORS FOR
UNIVERSITY MUSEUM IN MANY FIELDS

Measurements of Fifty
Cast and Chorus
VYaestrdAv

During the summer of 1921 the Uni-
versity Museum of Zoology had 11
collectors in various fields doing re-
search work. Most of the activities of
the department were carried on in
northern Michigan, in Cheboygan,
Marquette, and Altoona counties, but
collectors were also sent to southern
Tennessee and to North Dakota, where
the state biological survey was di-
rected by Norman A. Wood, curator
of birds at the Michigan Museum, and
Crystal Thompson, of the Amherst
college museum.
The South American studies that
have been in progress for several
years are being continued by co-ope-
ration with the Mulford expedition,
which is now somewhere on the east-
ern slope of the Andes, between Peru
and Colombia. A second expedition to
South America, under Mr. E. B. Wil-
liamson, will leave for the upper
Amazon basin this month.
Co-operation between nine univer-

sities and government departments en-
gaged in scientific work in the Ameri-
can-tropics will be established by the
new institute of research that is be-
ing fostered by the National Research
council. Michigan is a member of the
institute and its representative, Dr.'
A. G. Ruthven, director of the Uni-
versity Museum of Zoology, is a mem-
ber of the executive council. Head-
quarters for the institute are the oflic-
es of the National Research council at
Washington and all meetings are to be
held there.. Its object is to correlate
the scientific studies carried on in the
American tropics, and to avoid dupli-
cation of effort.
Fellowships approximating $20,000
in value have been given to the Uni-
versity and awarded to the Museum
by the will of the late Genevieve
Hinsdale, of Detroit. They will be
known as the Edwin C. Hinsdale fel-
lowships and the one available for
this year has been assigned to
Charles Creaser, grad.

SAYS CONDITIONS HERE SO
DESIRABLE HE WILL NOT
Declining an offer, to produce the

an-

Members
Taken

SHUTER REFUSES
TO LEAVE MIMES
University of Wisconsin Asks6 Him
to Make His Own Proposi-
tion

of

I1.,L~uy U
Measurement of 50 members of the
cast and chorus of "Make It For
Two," the 1922 Union opera, were
taken yesterday for their show cos-
tames. Lester, of Chicago, said to be
the foremost costumer in the country,
was here with an assistant and per-
sonally oversaw the measuring. He,
himself, is the designer of all the
wardrobes for the opera. Water col-
or plates were presented showing ex-
actly how the gowns will look, and it
was freely said that nothing anywhere
approaching the splendor- of this
year's costumes has ever appeared in
a former opera.
Permission had been given the cast
and chorus members to attend the
Illinois game provided they would get
back promptly for mesuring yester-
day. Everyone was back to a man,
the measuring was quickly done, Les-
ter and his assistant returned to Chi-
cago, and today the whole establish-
ment will be started on the opera's
costumes.
First Amateur Show.
"This is the first amateur show we
have ever costumed," said Lester yes-
terday. "But we hardly call the
Michigan Union opera amateur. In
Chicago your uniformly high class
performances have made your crowds
as large as the best of the profession-
als' audiences."
That the costumes are original and
will never be duplicated is assured
because of a standing offer of $1,000
for any costume that was ever dupli-
cated at his establishment.
Jeweld Effects Promised
Oriental jeweled effects are to have
a prominent place among the cos-
tumes, while a special feature will be
the square dresses of one chorus, the
very newest thing in dancing cos-
tumes. The color effects are said to
be elaborate.
"We did not think we stood a chance
of getting Lester to do our work for
us," said E. Mortimer Shuter, director
of the opera, yesterday. "We simply
'had to haye the best in costumes, and
therefore we asked him to make
them. We are elated that he is .to
make the costumes."

COMMITTEE APPOINTMENTS, COLLEGE
REPORTS MADE AT FACULTY MEETING

Prof. A. E. Boak, Prof. H. M. Randall
Selected to Serve on Dean's
Advisory Group
PROF. KARPINSKI SUCCEEDED
BY PROF. SCOTT ON COUNCIL
Appointments to several committees
and discussion of the report of the
committee on junior and senior col-
leges, were the chief items on the
business program of the faculty meet-
ing Monday afternoon. No action was
taken after the discussion on the col-
lege policy.
Prof. A. E. Boak of the history de-
partment will succeed Prof.. L. C.
Karpinski on -the Dean's Advisory
committee, and Prof. I. Leo Sharfman
of the economics ,department will be
succeeded by Prof. H. M. Randall of
the physics department on the same
committee.
Prof. J. W. Glover of the mathe-
matics department will be succeeded
on the Senate council by Prof. Fred
N. Scott of the rhetoric department.
Prof. H. H. Bartlett of the botany de-

BAND IN DEBT $274.74
The total expense of sending
the band to Illinois was $1,221.50, I
according to figures given out by
S. R. Bidwell, '23, manager of the
band. The contributions from the
student body amounted to 946.76,
leaving a deficit for the trip of
$274.74.
Included in the expense ac-
count are the following items:
Railroad tickets, including Pull-
mans, $1,059.00; breakfast, $45.25;
lunch, $51.25; dinner, $61.00;
baggage transportation, $5.00.
partment and Prof. C. P. Wagner of
the department of romance languages
will succeed Prof. J. S. Reeves of the
political science department and
Prof. J. G. Winter of the Latin de-
partment as members of the library
committee.
New appointments are necessitated
by the ruling that no committeeman
may succeed himself as a member of
a committee.

nual musical comedy of the Haresfoot
club of the University of Wisconsin, E.
Mortimer Shuter, director of the Union
opera, yesterday decided to remain at
Michigan. .The Haresfoot club has
been trying to secure Mr. Shuter for
the past three years, and this season
asked him to make them his own pro-
position. Mr. Shuter declned even to
do this, saying, "I regard Michigan al-
most as my own alma mater. I am at-
tached to it."
Dramatic work at the University of
Chicago was supervised to a certain
extent by Mr. Shuter several years
ago, but he feels that at Michigan
conditions are so satisfactory that he
does not even consider many other
offers which other schools have made
to him. They lack a stable organiza-
tion to back their shows, their policies
are less progressive, and their at-
tempts less ambitious. The popularity
of the Union opera which gives it
rank over the country with the best of
the professional productions.and the
consequent high morale and willing-
ness of the men in the show, according
to Mr. Shuter, is another factor which
influenced his decision to remain here,
where he has produced the last three
operas.
DITERIAEPIDEMIC
WELL UNDER CONTROL
Although there have been five deaths
from the local diphtheria epidemic, it
is now well under control, according
to information obtained at the city
health office. Only one new case has
been reported there since Thursday.
Practically every case has been among
pupils of the St. Thomas school, which
has been quarantined.
According to Dr. E. W. Sink, of the
Health service, diphtheria is an acute
contagious disease characterised by
moderate fever, glandular enlarge-
ment, great prostration, anemia and
the formation of a false membrane
upon certain muccous membrances, es-
pecially the throat and naso-pharynx.
It may be spread by coughing, sneez-
ing, expectoration and the use of com-
mon dishes and utensils.
Dr. Sink said that only two students
are reported to be suffering from diph-
theria, and it is probable that an epi-
demic will not arise if students will
recognize the importance of reporting
to the Health service if they have any
symptoms of the disease, since early
treatment will almost invariably pre-
*vent serious results.
'ENSIAN MUST HAVE SENIOR
PICTURES IN BEFORE NOV.18
All seniors are requested to ar-
range for Michiganensian sittings im-
mediately. Negligence on their part
will mean their forfeiture of a place
in the Michiganensian. Due to the
printing contract, all pictures must be
taken by Nov. 18.
Advance sales for the 1921-22 Mich-
iganensian will begin Nov. 14. The
campaign will continue until Nov. 18.
Fresh Lits Postpone Election
Election of freshman lit officers has
again been postponed on account of
the ineligibility of one of the proposed
candidates for president. The ballot-
ing will take place from 9 o'clock to
3 o'clock Wednesday at the booth in
University hall across from' the office
of the registrar. The candidates will
be announced tomorrow.

DIRECTORY GOES
ON SALE TODAY
The new Student directory, flaming
red in the color of its covers, and
some 20 pages larger than last year,
will be put on sale at various points
on the campus today.
The directory this year is out a
month earlier than that of last year,
so it is expected that it will remain up
to date for some months. Moreover
special cart has been taken to verify
all addresses and telephone numbers
in order to make the book as accur-
ate as possible.
. There are a few features in the
new guide which are improvements.
One is the use of bold face type to
set off the streets in the telephone
list. Another is the placing of the
advertiser's index in the back of the
book, where it will be more easily
found.
The price is unchanged from, last
years - it is 75 cents.
REGENTS DONATE
SCIENTIHIC FN
Give Permission to Appropriate $11,"
000 to Publish Papers of
Graduate School

INVITE SEVERAL SOCIETIES
TO CONVENEHERE IN

1922

LIST INCLUDES
28 FACULTY M11
CATTELL'S BOOK POINTS 01
"FOREMOST THOUSAND"
IN FIELD
1921 EDITION GIVES
9,500 LIFE SKETCHI
Professors in Astronomy, Chemist
Education, Medicine, Mathe...
matics Mentioned
Twenty-eight members of the U
versity faculty are rated among t
thousand greatest scientists of t
country in the 1921 edition of "Am

William Wheeler And Mrs. Rhead
Please Large Sunday Audience

I

Botany Exhibit
Poem In Flowers

(By Thomas E.]Dewey)
Thorough musicianship, excellent
taste in choosing their program and,
at times, brilliant technique, were ex-
hibited Sunday afternoon when Wil-
liam Wheeler, head of the voice de-
partment of the School of Music, and'

Permission to appropriate the sum'
of $11,000 to be used in the publicationf
of a number of scientific papers writ-{
ten by the faculty and students of the2
Graduate school, was granted at a
meeting of the Board of Regents heldt
here last Friday. Dean A. H. Lloyd#
of the Graduate school will have
charge of the selection of the mate-
rial to be published.1
The board invited A. J. Barnouw,l
now in this country as a representa-
tive of the Dutch government, to give
a series of three lectures at the Uni-
versity some time near the end of the
semester. The lectures will concernE
the language and literature of Hol-
land.
Extend Invitations
The Board of Regents also extend-
ed an invitation to several societies7
interested in different earth sciences to
hold their annual meetings here in the
holiday season of 1922. The societies
invited include: the Society of Eco-
nomic Geologists, the Association of
American Geographers, the Geological;
Society of America, and the Paleon-
tological Society of America. The re-
(Continued on Page Eight)
BINGAY WILL SPEAK TO
STUDENTS' PRESS CLUB
MEETING AT UNION TONIGHT
OPEN TO ALL THOSE
INTERESTED
Problems confronting the journalist'
will be discussed when the Students'
Press club meets at a buffet luncheon
at 6:15 o'clock tonight at the Union.
M. W. Bingay, managing editor of the
Detroit News, and Alan Schoenfield,
'18, special writer for that paper, have
been secured to give the speeches of
the evening.
Mr. Bingay will talk on the prob-
lems of the newspaper man in gen-
eral, while Mr. Schoenfield will talk
on "Interviews".
The meetings of the Students' Press
club are open to all of those who are
, in any way interested i newspaper or
magazine work. It is hoped by those
who are arranging a series of buffet
luncheons throughout the year, at
which prominent people will be se-
cured to speak, that all students in-
terested in these fields will feel free
to attend the meetings of the club.
Tickets for the luncheon tonight are
on sale and can be secured at the
Union and Wahr's book store.

(By Agnes Holmquist) Mrs. George B. Rhead, teacher of ad-
If Arnold Bennet's theory of the re- vanced piano work in the School of
lation of content and form were to be Music, gave a joint concert in Hill au-
followed to the letter this article ditorium before an audience of nearly
about the fall exhibition of chrysan- 2,000 people.
themums at the botanical gardens, Mrs. Rhead opened the program with
which will be opened to the public to- Schumann's Phantastie in C major,
day, would be written in poetry in- Opus 17 in three movements, a truly
stead of prose. The exhibits seem to romantic work, which Mrs. Rhead
grow better each year and those spon- played with a fine sense for gradations
soring the work are already looking in tone, and a feeling for the spirit of
forward to a bigger show next year. the work rather unusual in factulty
Personally speaking, the present col- concerts.
lection of plants seems quite excel- Following Mr. Wheeler's first group
lent enough. of songs, Mrs. Rhead played her sec-
A platform has been arranged down end group. In the first of this group
the sides of the greenhouse so that Mrs. Rhead played with unexaggerated
one may walk -along and look down simplicity, a selection which was ap-
lnto this solid mass of flower heads. preciated for that reason. The second
There are 80 varieties of them, many piece was decidedly the outstanding
from seedlings from the University one of her program and, combined with
botanical gardens. The exhibit tin- a technique which was truly remark-
eludes about 500 plants. The plants able, Mrs. Rhead injected into it an
vary from the mammoth yellow "Mrs. understanding of its interpretive re-
Pullmans" that stand six feet high, quirements which made hearing it a
to the small button flowers. real pleasure.

ican Men of Scipce" by J. McKeen
Cattell. This book contains biograph
ical sketches of 9,500 men who have
done work in the natural and exact
sciences, but only the names of 1,000
of these men are starred to indicate
pre-eminence in their particular field
of work.
Questionnaires Used
The "thousand greatest" were chos-
en. by sending out questionnaires to
representative men in the various
fields of science. These men were al-
so asked to express opinions as to
which men were leaders in their par-
ticular field. A careful examination
of the returns from these requests
resulted in the list given.
Prof. W. J. Hussey, who has been a
member of several research expedi-
tions and is member of many astro-
nomical associations, and Prof. R. H.
Curtiss represent the astronomy de-
partment, while four faculty men,
Prof. H. H. Bartlett, Prof. B. M.
Davis, Prof. C. H. Kaufman, and Prof.
F. C. Newcombe are considered among
the most eminent botanists.
The chemistry department is credit-
ed with three of the thousand in
Prof. S. IL. Bigelow, who has done
much valuable work on catalysis and
polarization with low voltages, Prof.
M. Gomberg; who holds the Nichols
medal for 1914, and Prof. E. D. Camp-
bell.
Two Psychologists
Prof. G. M. Whipple, of the depart-
ment of education, has attained
prominence for his work in education-
al psychology, and Prof. W. B. Pills-
bury, of the psychology department,
is listed for his work in connection
with the study of attention and fatigue
of sensory processes.
The two departments of the Univer-
sity : having the greatest number of
men are the Medical school and the
department of mathematics. The med-
ical representatives are Dean Emeri-
tus Victor C. Vaughan, Prof. A. .
Warthin, of the ,pathology department,
Prof. G. C. Huber, of the anatomy de-
partment, Prof. F. G. Novy, of the
bacteriology department, and Prof. W.
p. Lombard, of the physiology depart-
ment. The mathematicians are Prof.
A. Ziwet, Prof. L. C. Karpinski, Prof.
W. W. Beman, Prof. W. B. Ford, and
Prof. T. H. Hildebrandt.
Prof. H. M. Randall, of the physics
department, is on the list as are
three men from the zoology depart-
ment, Prof. 3. E. Reighard, Prof. A.
G. Ruthven, and Prof. A. F. Shull. The
latter is best known for his work in
the study of the comparative influence
of heredity and environment.
DAILY SUBSCRIPTIONS
Today is the last day to pay
for your Daily at the low rate of
$3.50.
Af1ter today the rate will be
$4.00. -
Mail checks or call in person
at The Daily office between 8
a. m. and 5 p. m.

Excellent French and exquisite art-
istry marked Mr. Wheeler's first group
of songs, which was composed of four
selections by French composers. Deli-
cate, each fitting the sope of Mr.
Wheeler's voice perfectly, the songs
were sung in a manner which show-
ed the artist's real mastery of that type
of work.
Five Grieg songs constituted the last
part of Mr. Wheeler's-work.
Dr. Van Der Hoeve Speaks Today
Dr. Van der Hoeve of Holland will
give a lecture to the faculty and stu-
dents of the Medical school at 11
o'clock this morning in the Medical
amphitheater. Dr. Van der Hoeve is}
professor of ophthalmology at the
University of Leyden. His subject
Tuesday will be "The Embryology of
the Lachrymal Apparatus".
Prof. Barnouw Postpones Lectures
Prof. A. J. Barnouw of Holland, who
was to have given a series of three
lectures here on Nov. 3, 4, and 5, has
been forced to postpone his engage-
ment because of a severe attack of
tonsilitis. The date of his lectures,
which will be given in the near future,
will be announced in a few days..

IL'

OSSIP

GABRILOWITSCH and the

POPULAR PRICES
FIVE BIG CONCERTS
$2.00 - $3.00 - $4.00
$5.00

TICKETS ON SALE

DETROIT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
WILL GIVE FIVE BIG POPULAR ORCHESTRA-ARTIST CONCERTS IN HILL AUDITORIUM:
(1) Nov. 8--ESTELLE LIEBLING, Soprano; (2) Dec. 12-RAOUL VIDAS, Violin; (3) Jan. 23-
OSSIP GABRILOWITSCH, Pianist; (4) Feb. 20 - HANS KINDLER, 'Cello; (5) March 27 -
BENDETSON NETZORG. Pianist.

-AT THE -

UNIVERSITY SCHOOL
OF MUSIC

r y

RC

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