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October 28, 1921 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-10-28

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28,

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OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
PuIlished every morning except Monday during the Univer-
ety year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OP THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
class nmatter.
Sunscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building,. Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 96o, Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Paily' at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
uscript will be rcturned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
pressed in the communications.
"What's Going On" nofices will not be received after 6 o'clock
on the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR ..........BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
Assistant Managing Editor...............IIugh W. Hitchcock
City Editor................ ......... .. E. P. Lovejoy, Jr.
Night Editors-
M. B. Stahl G. P. Overton
R. E. Adams Hughston McBain
Paul WatFel Edward Lambrecht
F. H. McPike
Editorials..T. J. Whinery, L. A. Kern, S. T. Beach, E. R. Meiss
Sunday Magazine Editor ........................T. S. Sargent.
Sporting Editor .................................George Reindel
Women's Editor ..........................Elizabeth Vickery
Humor ,Editor ................................... E R. Meiss
Assistants
Harry B. Grundy John Dawson Ben H. Lee, Jr.
Wallace F. Elliott Sidney B. Coates Julian Mack
Xw A. Klaver Lowell S. Kerr Howard Donahue
Dorothy Whipple H. E. Howlett Arnold Fleig
Marion Koch Katherine Montgomery
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGtR .............VERNON F. HILLERY
Advertising..........................F. M. Heath, A. J. Parker
Publication..............................Nathan W. Robertson
Accounts ..................John J. Hamels, Jr.
Circulation................................... Herold C. Hunt
Assistants,
Burr L. Robbins Richard Cutting H. Willis Heidbreder
W. Cooley James Prentiss W. Kenneth Galbraith
L. Beaumont Parks Maurice Moule J. A. Dryer
Walter Scherer M\'artin Goldring Richard Heidemann
Edw. Murane Tyler Stevens T. H. Wolfe
Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for
any issue of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full
charge of all news to be printed that night.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1921
Night Editor-G. P. OVERTON

GET A HORN!
It is a strange psychology which prompts men to
boast continually when their own side is winning,
but to lie down in spiritless agony and give up the
ghost as soon as the tide turns against them. But
something exactly like this is seen in the attitude of
a large part of the campus on the subject of this
year's football. We win, and we praise; we lose,
and we knock. And this at a time when the coach
and team need our support as they never needed it
before.
Our whole viewpoint is based on an old over-fed
illusion that we are a little better than anyone else.
For years we have won everything, and we have
fairly grown into complete possession and contin-
ued utterance of the cry of the Pharisee, "0 Lord,
I thank thee that I am not as other men !" But
that cry was made for peace; not war; and now,
when we are bucking the biggest in the country,
when we are going up against the kind of football
that no one ever before experienced, in spite of all
the mch-lauded rowdiness of the old days, our
cry is worthless. The result is that we pick up our
little tin hammer of complaint, and away we go on
the warpath of gloom..
It-is about time that this sort of thing was brought
to an end. Why should the loss of one game turn
us so topsy-turvy? Consider Minnesota, who has
hardly won a game for two years. Consider the
Illini, former champions, who have two defeats and
no victories on their 1921 Conference slate. Then
remember that, although we have always praised
the- football of the East, our own Chicago, last year
badly defeated by Michigan, is able to crow over
Princeton, while Indiana, admittedly one of the
weakest sisters of the Big Ten, was recently downed
by glorified Harvard by a score of but 19 to o.
Michigan is up against a football power with
which can be compared that of no other section of
the country. She is fighting the hardest of hard
battles, and, if she should lose occasionally, we
still have absolutely no excuse for throwing down
our megaphones and mourning over lost glory.
The Pharisee never accomplished anything and
never will. He is a non-entity and a drag. Let's
forget our old self-glorified howl, forget the days
of continued victories, and live in the present. We
have a chance this week-end to boost the team, and
it is about time our-energies were turned toward its
aid rather than toward a continual complaining of
the work of squad and coach.
Psychology is a great thing.
Get a Horn!t
'THE WOMEN'S BUILDING DRIVE
A number of years ago the men of Michigan
commenced a drive among students and alumni for
funds to build themselves a center of recreation and
activities. This culminated recently in the con-
struction of the Michigan Union, a student social
institution which has since been the model for
structures of the same character in universities
throughout the United States.
Today the women of Michigan are starting their
first definite campaign to obtain a building to house
their activities and to afford them recreational ad-
vantages. Their plan to obtain money is similar to
that employed by the men. The initial drive is be-
ing directed toward the enrollment of every Michi-

gan woman as a life member of the Women's
league. After this has been accomplished the alum-
nae will be asked for aid. A sum of $5oo,ooo must
be raised before the University will furnish a site
for the project, while the total expenditure is ex-
pected to be $,00,00.
This afternoon at 4 o'clock President Marion L.
Burton will open the life membership drive of the
Women's league. There is no reason why the
women of Michigan should not be able to obtain a
structure equally as complete, as admired, and as
copied by other universities as that of the men of
Michigan. A generous response from the present
student body will prove the greatest incentive to-
wards stretching the giving power of those who
have finished their college days.
DISCOURAGE THE SCALPER
Previous to the football game last Saturday
much evidence of ticket scalping was noted. In
public places and in front of the gates at Ferry field
seats were sold at prices which were in some cases
five times as high as their original cost.
In modern society the ticket scalper is as much
out of place as the more violent kinds of robbers.
There may have been a time when his tricks were
winked at but it has come to be realized that profit-
eering on seats is the bane of amusements relying
on public financial support. The light of publicity.
has pointed out its evils and scalping has been pro-
'hibited by law.
That a Michigan student should engage in the
practice is a discredit to the University. When an
applicant signs up for a ticket to one of the game's
he enters a moral obligation not to sell it for more
than the established price. But what is more there
is a legal side to the question. Incorporated in the
statutes of Michigan is a law which clearly states
that ticket scalping is prohibited and is punishable
by the judiciary machinery of the state.
Morally and legally obligated not to sell tickets
for more than their original price, the student who
takes part in it is doing so at his own risk. He can
hardly expect the University authorities or law to
look with favor upon him and should receive no
encouragement from those he holds up.
Tomorrow several hundred Michigan rooters
will invade Urbana. Perhaps you will be among
them. Illinois will welcome you. You will arrive
full of pep and enthusiasm. In your excitement
remember to do nothing that will reflect on the good
name of the University. Let Illinois know that
Michigan has come, but when you depart, do so
with an invitation to return.
Furthermore we wish to retain the advantage of
football specials in the future. So in coming home
don't vent your jubilation on railway property.
"Police hear dog bite girl," declares the Detroit
News. The force must be equipped with ear-trum-
pets.
Take the old I WILL idea to Illinois.
The Telescope
IMPRESSIONS
Joe's, Obit 1918
Lusty laughs, a snatch of song
The crash of an upturned chair,
Bantering jeers for a muddled jest,
And a veil of blue in the air.
-Phil Pack, '8.
Chicago.
"Do you know the difference between a woman
and a parasol?"
"Yes, you can close the parasol."
Quoth Eppie Taff:
Most even-tempered man in town,
Yet everyone is glad
That he has started going down
'Cause he was always mad.

Pardon Our English Sense of Humor!
In the above joke about the parsol, we just found
out that the difference is this: "You can shut the
parasol up." Thanks for your indulgence.
It Won't Happen Again, Sir
There was a young freshman, quite dumb,
Who too late to classes would come,
When questioned one day
Why he acted that way
Said, "A half a loaf's better than none."
- 0. Y. Knott.
An Old One, But Irs Timely
"Have you any children?" demanded the land-
lord.
"Yes," replied the would-be tenant solemnly,
"six - all in the cemetery."
"Better there than here," said the landlord, and
he proceeded to fill out the lease.
Soon the children returned from the cemetery
where they had been playing, but too late to annual
the contract. - Teddy Bear.
Songs of the Immortals
We make our bow
To Mary Aultz,
She still knows how
To dance a waltz.
Famous Closing Lines
"Sleep tight," said his friends as they dragged
him in and threw him on the bed, ERM.

.. .I

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Expresscars-6.os a.
in., 7 :o5 a. mn., S8: io a. mn. and hourly to 9 :to
P. M.
Jackson Express cars (local stops of Ann
Arbor), 9:48 a. m. and every two hours to
9:48 p. m".
Local Cars East Bound-5:55 a.m., 7:00 a.
m. and every two hours, to 9 :oo p. in., i2 :o0
p. mn. To Ypsilanti only--11:40 P. im., 12.25
a.mi., 1:15 a, m
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local cars West Bound-7:5o a. m., 2:44 p.

Chbamber of Commerce Inn
We Cater to Banquets, Society Gatherings and
Private Parties in addition to our regular high
class Cafe Service,

Cor. Ann and Fourth

PhoneF6

rt

To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited
8:48,1 :481 a. mi., 12:48, 2:48, 4:48.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited:
P. M.

cars:
8:48

1921

OCTOBER

2
16
28
80

10
17
24
81

4
11
25

6
12
19
26

6
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27

7
14
21
28

1921
1
8
16
2.2
29

NOTICE TO MEN
We do all kinds of high-class Hat
work at pre-war prices. Hats turned
inside out, with all new trimmings,
are as good as new.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792
EAT!
-AT THE -
PEARL DINING
ROOMS
GOOD HOME COOKING
3 Meals ..........$7.50
Lunch and Dinner... 6.50
Breakfast and Dinner 5.75
IT IS WORTH A TRIAL
1030 EAST UNIVERSITY AVE.

Get in
On This
This week's special brick
is going to be the best
ever. It will have three
layers as usual: choco-
late, vanila and grape nut.

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.
.-' may"
,. ..
,.--
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Kindly send in orders by 9:00 P. M. Saturday.
TRUBEY' S
218 SOUTH MAIN
Phone 166
NOTE:-WE SERVE LIGHT LUNCIES.

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Log Log Slide Rules
AT
GRAHAM'S
Both ends of the diagonal balk

ordially. ivites you to attend the
opeingoftheir new store atf
Friday evening, October 28, 1921
at eight o'clock
aality will be tendered you as has
eretofore been our custom at the
Nickels Arcade store.
ahlady gest will be presented
with a -souvenir.
Bl t e V o s m p E LIBERTY NICKELS ARCADE
Members of the Florists Telegram Delivery

U...

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