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October 28, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-10-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

- ~.

THE WEATHER

I

PROBABLY RAIN
TODAY

SAiri┬žUf

:43 at t9

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

,.

VOL. XXXII. No. 29 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1921 PRICE FIVE CENT

CHIEFS OF BI 5
NAMER COMMITTEE'
TO KALT STRIKE

REA IS CHAIRMAN
FOR FALL GAMES

Wear

The Colors To Illinois

Walter B.
chairman of
preparations

Rea, '22, was appointed
a committee to make
for the fall games at a

Wear the Michigan colors to Illinois, because the Michigan team is go-
ing to play a game that will make you proud to have the Michigan colors
on display. More than that, you will be wearing the colors of a victorious

MEETING HELD LAST NIGHT
DRAW UP GENfRAL RES-
OLUTION

TO

I
{
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i

LEADERS EXPECT NO +
OPPOSITION TO PLAN+
Decision Comes After Long Series of
Sesslops and Threat of Force
By Government
BULLETIN
(By Associated Press)
Chicago, Oct. 27,-11:46 P. M.-
The railroad strike was called off fol-
lowing tonight's conference.
Chicago, Oct. 27.-Chiefs of the Big
Five rail labor unions which have call-
ed a strike for Oct. 30, tonight ap-
pointed a committee to draw up a res-
olution calling off the proposed walk-
out and to prevent it as soon as pos-
sible. Indications were that it would
be some time before the resolution
could be drafted.
The resolutions committee began
work at 8:80 o'clock tonight. It had
been instructed to "work carefully and
bring back a resolution which would
explain fully the union attitude in
the matter.."
Chiefs Favor Resolution
several union chiefs, among them
W. G. Lee, of the trainmen, said that
they believed the resolution would be
passed without serious opposition.
The decision followed a whole day
of rail union meetings, sessions /of
the labor board, and conferences be-
tween the representatives of the -two
groups, during which high oficials of
the employees' organization were in-
formed that unless peace came by to-
morrow it would "deal with the unions
with ungloved hands" in order to pre-
vent a walkout.
Board Threatens Committees
The statement from the labor board
was delivered to union committees
which called on the board during the
day to report the progress of the joint
conference of chieftains of the switch-
men, trainmen, conductors, engineers,
and firemen. The conference was
forced to adjourn late today without
taking action because the lease on its
meeting room had run out. The ses-
sion was continued at a hotel a short
time later, however..
Just before entering the night meet-
ing, W. G. Lee, president of the broth-
erhood of railroad trainmen, stated to
the Associated Press: "There is every
reasoY4 to believe that certain arrange-
ments would be made tonight whereby
the strike scheduled for Oct. a0 will be
called oft." ,

meeting of the Student council Wed-
nesday night. The games will be
held on the morning of Nov. 19, the
day of the Michigan-Minnesota game.
Other members of the committee are:
C. H. Daly, '22L, E. F. Moore, '22E,
and P. H. Scott, '22.
As yet no definite games have been
decided on, and the committee is
considering which of the games used
in past years can best be used at this
time. At present either the flag rush
or the cane spree stands a possibility
of being adopted, with the addition of
one or two minor games such as were
used last year.
BEGIN POSTERH WORK FOR
GLEE, MANOLIN CONCERT

F
i
i
t
t
s
t

NEW

CLUB OFFICERS CHOSEN;
FRESHMAN WORK
ORGANIZED

team! Michigan is going to Illinois.
dent backers of the Michigan team.

Let the Illini know you are the ar-
Wear the Michigan colors to Illinois.

Work" on posters for the Varsity
Glee and Mandolin club concert this
fall is to begin at once, it was an-o
nounced Wednesday night by Charlesa
E. Futch, '23M, president of the club.-
Men who wish to work on the postersp
are requested to report at 4:30 f
o'clock today in room 308 of thea
Union.1
New officers were appointed as fol-
lows: Lloyd Kemp, '22M, leader oft
the Varsity quartet; Robert M. Die-s
terly, '23M, leader of the Glee club,
and J. M. Lightbody, '23, manager of,2
the Freshman club.t
The first meeting of the Freshmanc
cii 'Tas held Wednesday night andt
more than 30 men were in attend-a
ance. Work for the year was outlin-t
ed and the preliminary steps to thet
organization of the club were com-f
pleted.
?ive Places Give a
Illinois Returns
Returns from the Michigan-Illinois
game tomorrow will be given out atk
the Union, Majestic theater, Huston
brothers, Arcade theater, or by call-_
ing 960, The Daily business office. No
results will be given out over The
Daily editorial phones. The Daily will
put out an extra giving a play by play
account of the game.
A leased wire from i linois will give
all the details of the game at the
Union. There will be an imitation#
football field in the reading room on
the second floor, on which a footballt
will be moved around to show the
position of the ball during the game.
Results will also be announced in the
billiard and tap rooms.1
The Majestic theater will have a
miniature football field on the stage
and show the progress of the game?
with a moving football. In addition,1
a scoreboard will be used and the
details of the plays announced. The
regular show will be given either be-
tween halves or after the game.
Huston brothers have leased a wire
and will announce results of the con-
test. The Arcade theater will read
returns every two or three minutes
but will not give a play by play re-
port.
Soph. Lits to Meet Tuesday
Harry G. ipke, '24, president of the
sophomore literary class, announces
a meeting of the class to be held at
.4 o'clock next Tuesday afternoon,
room 206, Mason hall. Every member
of the class is urged to be present.
WEAR THE MICHIGAN COLORS TO
ILLINOIS.

JETROIT ALUMNI
BACK COACH YOST
Fighting Michigan Spirit Comes Out
at Large Weekly Luncheon
and Assembly
PLAN BIG SMOKER SATURDAY
TO HEAR ILLINOIS RETURNS
(Special to The Daily)
Detroit, Oct. 27.-Michigan's fight-
ng come-back spirit was revealed
his noon at the Hotel Cadillac when
Detroit alumni of the University met
n what proved to be the largest at-
ended weekly alumni luncheon held
his year. Coach Yost, the principal
speaker, was received with cheers by
the large gathering.
Yost Gives Talk
Yost made a comprehensive resume
of the football situation and told the
alumni that Michigan was going to
come back stronger than ever in the
game Saturday with Illinois. He ex-
plained that injuries kept the team
from doing its best work last week
and that the injured men would be
in fighting trim this week. Rousing
cheers followed the coach's talk and
the meeting was charged with enthu-
siasm for the game Saturday.
Under Mason P. Rumney, '08, the
new head of the alumni in Detroit,
the meeting started off with all indi-
cations pointing to the biggest year
the alumni have yet held. A new get-
acquainted stunt was introduced when
the men were called upon by classes
to stand up and shout their names at
the top of their voices. Preparations
for having every man know every
other man in the organization are be-
ing made and the establishment of
a real Michigan club is anticipated.
To Hear Illinois Returns
Arrangements are completed for the
big smoker to be held Saturday after-
noon during the game with Illinois,
when the game will be followed play
by play by prominent "M" men on a
(Continued on Page Eight)

BUILDING DRIVE[
TO BEGIN TODAY
Women Start Campaign for the New
League Structure at Meeting
This Afternoon
PRESIDENT BURTON WILL
TELL, NEED OF BUILDING
xUniversity women will launch a
drive at 4 o'clock this afternoon in
Hill auditorium for life membership
in the University of Michigan league,
which has for its purpose the raising
of funds for a league building. This
structure will serve a purpose simi-
lar to that of the Michigan Union.
President Marion L. Burton will
give an address on "The Women's
Building". Neva Lowell, '22, and Su-
san Fitch, '23, will explain the cam-
paign fund and membership in the
league, and an amendment will be
voted on concerning the filling of va-
cancies in the board of directors of
the league.
Membership Liberally Granted
Membership in the League is to be
based on a liberal policy in order
that the League building may prove
of greatest usefulness to the women of
the University, to the alumnae, and
to the city of Ann Arbor, according
to the report made by the member-
ship committee, of which Mrs. Max
Winkler is chairman.
Membership is open to students or
alumnae who have earned at least 15
hours of credit in the University, fac-
ulty women, administrative officers,,
women belonging to the immediate
family of faculty members, women be-
longing to the immediate family of
administrative officers, and members
of the Ann Arbor branch of the Amer-
ican Association of University Women.
Paid For in Instalments
In the above classes membership
may be paid in annual instalments of
$10 each year until the total of $50,
has been paid. For wives of alumni,
the membership fee is $100.

ALUMNUS FEATURES
OHIO STATE GAME
One of the features of this week's
Alumnus is a series of comments on
the 0. S. U. game, among which is
the following remark by Prof. Ralph
W. Aigler, of the Law school: "Noth-
ing was lacking to make the day a
complete success except a Michigan
victory. "
Another article by Dean Hugh Ca-
bot, of the Medical school, pays high
tribute to Dr. Victor C. Vaughan, for-
mer dean of the Medical school.
Several letters received from read-
ers of the Alumnus praise the new
form in which the weekly is now
printed. Among these is one from N.
H. Bowen, '00, associate editor of the
Detroit Saturday Night, in which he
says: "I wish to extend my congrat-
ulations to you on your success in es-
tablishing your magazine on a; weekly
pasis. We are greatly interested
in it.",
STRUCTURAL WORK ON
HOSPITAL NEARLY DONE1

(By Paul Watsel)
That Michigan rooters are solidly
behind their team and their coach was
demonstarted last night when more
than 2,000 students marched to the Ann
Arbor railroad station to see the team
leave for Illinois.
The procession, starting on State
street in a drizzling rain, marched be-
hind the band through the campus bus-
iness section and through the down
town district, singing Michigan songs
and giving the college yells. The
weather did not affect the rooters;
only those who feared that the "ex-
treme dampness" might injure their
delicate constitutions remained in
their rooms.
Handles Capacity Crowd

SPEED-SQUAD TW
ILLINOI-S BATTLE
2,000 ROOTERS MARCH TO SEE
TEAM LEAVE FOR
URBANA
"EX 'REME DAMPNESS"
KEEPS SOME AT HOME

IWill Make it a Different
Saturday," Dunne Tells
Crowd

NO CONTRACTS GIVEN YET
INTERIOR WORK; MORE
MONEY NEEDED

FOR

Story

All contracts which have been let on
new University hospital will have been
completed within two weeks, according'
to the statement of the contractors.
The Thompson-Starrett company, of
New York, which was-awarded the
contrast on the structural work, ex-
pects to have its contract completed
within a week.
The work accomplished so far com-
pletes the foundation and structural
contracts, this work involving an ex-
pense of more than $1,500,000. Con-
tracts have not as yet been given for
the interior work, petitioning, glass
work, and equipment, and it is estim-
ated that these conltracts will run
over $2,500,000, making a total cost of
approximately $4,000,000 for the fin-
ished building.
Work is progressing on the adminis-
traion building, adjoining the hospital
structure, but no part of the hospital
will be completed until a further ap-
propriation is obtained from the state.
Of the funds appropriated to the Uni-
versity for buildings by the 'state leg-{
islature last spring, $300,000 have been
used on contracts then pending for
the hospital, but the remainder of this
sum is to be used for campus build-
ings and not on the new hospital.
Dr. C. G. Parnall, director of the Un-
iversity hospital, says that everyone is
aware of the crowded conditions at the

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Student Opinions Call Criticism
Of Yost falicious And Destructive

SPECIAL SCHEDULE
The special train to Urbana
leaves Ann Arbor at 10 o'clock
city time (or 9 o'clock railroad
time) tonight, It arrives at Ur-
bana at 7 o'clock tomorrow
morning and leaves at 10 o'clock
tomorrow night, arriving here at
9 o'clock city time, Sunday morn-
tug,
Those who wish to go to Chi-
cago can either leave the special
as it passes through Sunday
morning or take the regular 6:30
o'clock train out of Urbana Sat-
urday night. The special train
is the last on which the special
tickets will be honored. The
last train out of Chicago Sunday
night leaves at 10 o'clock rail-
road time.

During the past two days the edi-
torial office of The Daily has been
flooded with letters in reply to the
one by R. S. Tubbs, '22, published in
Wednesday's edition. The gist of
Tubbs' communication was in effect
that Michigan's recent football show-
ing has been due to poor coaching.
In reply, many communications
have been received, one from a facul-
ty member, expressing various shades
of opinion, but none condemning the
Michigan coach. It would be impos-
sible to publish all of these letters,
but the following resume will give
the reader an idea of the main points
brought forward.
Charges Cold Feet
The first letter at hand is from
Ross S. Campbell, '23. Campbell char-
acterizes the letter of Mr. Tubbs as
being "of malicious intent and thor-
ough yellowism". Says this corre-
spondent: "Whoever heard of a Mich-
igar, student body getting cold feet,
acting like babies, sucking the milk
of defeat, and then laying down and
kicking? Never before has such rot-
ten spirit been shown, such utterly
unfounded pessimism. Are we the
group that will forever label Michi-
gan as a University of blackguards
and quitters? The thing is absurd!

old hospital and of the immediat4 ne-
has an ounce of fight in his or her cessity for larger quarters, but at this
makeup will not stand idly by and time no word is forthcoming as to how
allow Coach Yost to be put out of his soon the new structure will be ready
place merely to please the foibles of for occupancy.
a few notoriety-seeking pessimists. *
* * We simply didn't have the go- England Doesn't Want Charles
gett'em spirit. It isn't the team; it London, Oct. 27. - Under,no cir-
isn't Yost; it's 'US." cumstances "will former Emperor
H. F. Stamos, '24, says that at Mich- Charles of Austria-Hungary be allow-
igan "the blame always falls on the ed to come to England. This was the
coach. It is about time we ceased answer today in official circles- to a
blaming Yost. Michigan is apparent- reported desire of the emperor to ac-
ly the only university where coaches cept an exile in the British Isles and
are to blame. * * * When there is to take up life there as a country
a victory nothing is said, but when gentleman.
there is a defeat Yost is sure to get
blamed. Yost is the best coach in the
Conference and perhaps the greatest DAILY SUBSCRIPTIONS
coach in America. Enough of this
poor sportsmanship." -The Daily business office re-
Blames Student Body quests all persons paying sub-
Another correspondent who does not scriptions to do so between the
want his name published declares: hours of 8 o'clock and 5 o'clodk.
"The student body was to blame! I It is also requested that where
,have no pep. How can I have any? the mail is used checks and not
Nobody else has!" . cash be sent. The address of the
Another writer, Edward R. Gold- subscriber to be given in each
- man, '22E, says: "Let us look at the instance.}
facts," and goes ahead to prove that
Yost is not at fault. "If our team felt
- like some of the men on the campus
s and had their spirit we might just as WEAR THE MICHIGAN COLORS TO
(Continued on Page Eight) ILLINOIS.

The small Ann Arbor station was
soon handling a capacity crowd, and
the noisy students swarmed on the
roof. and on near-by box cars . Songs
yells and cheers were led by "Al"
Cuthbert, Varsity cheer leader.
The sleeping car upon which the
squad was to leave for the Indians'
territory waited on the side-track for
the Maize and Blue -warriors as, cheers
for each individual on the squad were
given. "The Victors", "Varsity", and
"The Yellow and Blue" were sung by
the crowd as they waited for the grid-
ders to arrive.
Call For Speeches
Presently the team came up amid
the cheers of the crowd, and calls for
"speeches" were heard. "Duke"
Dunne, Varsity captain, was the first
to give the rooters assurance that the
team would put every ounce of
strength into the coming battle with
the Illini "We hope to do what we
tried to do last Saturday and failed,
if that word pleases some of you,"
he said. "Saturday we will make it a
different story."~
The cheers of the crowd showed that
they appreciated the spirit of fight
which seemed to be dominant in the
captain as he spoke. Hearty cheers
for the team and the coach showed the
confidence of the student body in the
gridders and their mentor.
Following "the Duke's" speech, the
rootersucalled for other members of
the squad, and Banks gave a short
talk as he backed up the Pullman
steps, aiding himself with his 'cane.
He declared that his presence in Ur-
bana was merely for "moral support,"
but assured the students that the team
was going to fight, and fight hard.
Archie Hahn, Varsity trainer, gave
the same assurance of the team's su-
preme efforts.
Close With "Yea Team"
With a final hearty "Yea Team," tlhe
crowd started, to break up in order to
allow the players to retire and get a
much needed rest before the big battle
of Saturday. Repeated calls for Kipke
continued, however, until the star half-
back appeared on the car steps and
spoke a few words. The crowd was
satisfied, left the station and followed
the band back to the campus.
The members of the team retired
early and in a short time were on
their way to Illinois and the big fight.
SWEARTHE MICHIGAN COLORS TO
ILLINOIS.

, I

WEAR THE
ILLINOIS.

MICHIGAN COLORS

TO

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