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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 03, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-06-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

____THE MICHIGAN DAILY

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during Elhe Upiversity
year by the Board in Control of Student Publicatvns.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATRD P"AcS
The Associate tress is exclusively etitlGd itothe ass'o
republication of s' otws dispatrliv, credited t* I i, ac* eth.r "ass
credited is this paper and tro iscalewa pubiahsx d oke a
ntered at the oetomes a A A Ab r. W sran. as s tesa'
clses mater.
Subscription by carrier or mal s.3o.
Omces: Ann Arbor Press Building. Maynard Street.
Pho.ies: Business. g6s; Editorial, a44.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the signs
cure not necessarily to appear in print but as an evidence of faith.
and notices of events will be published in Tice Daily at ti~e discre-
tion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office. Unsigned
communications will receive no consideration No manuscript will
be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments expressed
in the communications-
EDIT&xtIAL STAFF3
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR............BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
Editor...........................Joseph A. Bernstein
City Editor................ ...............James B. Young
Ass't City Editor...........:.....-....--.----....Marion Kerr
Night Editors-
R. E. Adams G. P. Overton
John P. Dawson_ M. B. Stahl
Edward Lambrecht Paul Watzel
Frank McPike
Editorial Board Chairman................L. Armstrong Kern
e~ditorial Board-
Leo Hershdorfer .4. R. Meiss
C. T. Andrews
Sunday Magazine Editor......... Thornton W. Sargent, Jr.
exchange Editor...........................Geodge E. Sloan
Music Editor............................Sidney B. Coates
sporting Editor.............................George Reindel
Conference Editor..... ........-..- ----. --.. -.E.Harry B. Grundy
Women's Editor...........................Elizabeth Vickery
Elumor Editor........................... ...... . R. Meiss
Assistants
Maurice Berman R. A. Donahue Marion Koch
Jack D. Briscoe Dorothy G. Geltz 3. E. Mack
W. B. Butler H. B. Grundy Kathirine Montgomery
R. N. Byers Winona A. Hibbard R. C. Moriarty
A. D. Clark Harry D. Hoey Lillian Scher
Harry C. Clark Marion Kerr R. B. Tarr
Evelyn J. Coughlin Victor Klein Virginia Tryon
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER..............VERNQN F. HILLERY
Advertising ................................Albert J. Parker
Advertising .............................John J. Hamel, Jr.
Publication..............................Nathan W. Robertson
Accounts................. ...........WalterK . Scherer
Circulation................................... Herold C. Hunt

L,. Beaumont Parks
Edw. Murane
James Prentiss
David Park
T. H. Wolfe
Stanley Monroe
William Graulich
Harvey Reed
George Rockwood
E. D. Armantrout
Eydward Conlin

Assistants
Lawrence Favrot
C. D. Malloch
Wallace Flower"
Charles R. Richards
Richard G. Burchell
H. W. Cooper
W. K. Kidder
D. L. Pierce
C. L. Hagerman
S. L Baner
C. L. Putnam
A. S. Morton
James Bernard

K. C. Seick
Berbert Good
H. L. Hale
Arthur Hartwell
A. M. White.
Glen Jepsen
Howard Hayden
J. Blumenthal
Eugene 'Dunne
John C. Haskins
W. D. Roesser
J. S. Comnpton

SATURDAY, JUNE 3, 1922
Night Editor-H. A. DONAHUE
Assistant-G. P. Overton
THE NEW DISCIPLINE
In accordance with the report of the special com-
mittee on inquiry appointed by President Marion L.
Burton, the Underclass Conduct committee of -the.
Student council will continue to function next fall
in the disciplining of freshmen who refuse to ad-
here to the restrictions and rules for first year men.
In order to avoid any recurrence of certain unfor-
,tunate incidents which took place this year, how-
ever,, the Underclass Conduct committee will not
employ any, physical punishment, but instead some
means whereby the offending freshman may be os-
tracized by his own classmates and made ineligible
for all campus activities will be carefully planned
during the coming summer for use next year.
Such a plan, if it proves successful, should finally
result in the doing away of all hazing. For it to be
a complete success, however, a change of attitude
on the part of the yearlings will be necessary. The
old idea that the wearing of a pot and the observ-
ing of the rules is simply a form of upperclass bul-
lying must be supplanted by a feeling of class unity
,and a desire to take life at Michigan as it comes,
and live it for all it is worth.
High school graduates come to Ann Arbor each
fall, cloaked in- all the dignity that a high school
,youth can assume. When, therefore, upon their ar-
rival custom steps in, and arbitrarily replaces fe-
doras by grey skullcaps, besides administering other
shocks to the prep-school poise, it is only natural
that the graduates should adhere to the rules at
best under silent protest, and that at times more
impulsive or obstinate ones should become recalci-
.trant, until some action is taken to bring them back
to the fold. The action in former years was physi-
cal discipline, administered by members of other
classes.
Under the system to be used next year, the fresh-
ntan will be asked to see that every member of their
class obeys the rules. Special efforts will also be
made by the Student council, at the annual Tradi-
tions meeting and other freshman assemblies, to
make clear all customs to the first-year men, and to
show them that the restrictions imposed -upon them
are a part and parcel of their college life at Michi-
gait, that they are as fair for one as for all, and
that they should be willingly obeyed. With such an
understanding gained, the promising new system for
the preservation of freshman customs should be
made workable, simply because the council will have
the co-operation of the freshman class itself.
FROM THE ENDS OF THE EARTH
Inquiry confirms the impression commonly held
that Michigan is conspicuous among universities for
the number of foreign students enrolled. Columbia,
situated in the cosmopolitan port of New York, so
greatly surpasses all other universities in this re-
spect as to be in a class by herself; but of those
>thers Michigan heads the list by a substantial mar-

gin. At Michigan especially, therefore, - though
hardly less so at any other great American univer-
sity - tie question of cosmopolitanism among stu-
dents is one which deserves thoughtful considera-
tion.
Michigan naturally has a large number of stu-
dents from Cana'la, although it is difficult to think
of Canadians as aliens except in a technical sense ;
they are essentiallf no more strangers than are the
men and women from our own states outside of
Michigan. Besides them, however, the bulk of our
foreign students come from far off South Africa,
,India, and the Orient, with a lesser number from
the West Indies and Central and South America.
It is safe to say that students who have trav-
elled half the girth of the world to attend an Amer-
can state university, are above the average of stu-
dents in the countries from which they hail. This
probably explains the favorable scholarship rec-
prds made by nearly all of these students, notwith-
standing their language handicap, compared with the
averages in the classes which they attend.
This same condition also points to the probability
that our foreign visitors, themselves naturally ret-
icent among strangers, will perhaps always be sensi-
tive of a certain amount of indifference, and possi-
bly of some degree of discourtesy, on the part of
the less thoughtful students from American homes.
But there will not be wanting many Americans who
will readily comprehend the alien's student's posi-
tion, and will find many natural ways to express the
personal aid national friendliness which really ex-
ists between true Americans-and all well-disposed
foreigners.
Such Americans do not need to be told that there
is no formula for the treatment of aliens who are
their fellow students or classmates. Imagination in-
deed has many uses, and a little thoughtful contem-
plation often will deepen understanding surpris-
ingly. When it is remembered that people the
world over are after all just people, and that all the
,fine qualities of character thrive in thoughtful and
,adventurous hearts everywhere, there need be no
.dearth of jolly good friendships among students
.who, though alien in race or nationality, are united
,for the present as fellow students at Michigan.
KEEP THE EARLY CALENDAR
. When the -school calendar was revised so as to
bring Commencement earlier in the year, a change
highly pleasing to students was instituted. When
,the Uniersity is adjourned late in the season, as has
been -the case at Michigan in former years, it means
somewhat of an inconvenience for students who
wish to attend school during the summer, giving
them only the shortest "breathing space" between
the finish of the regular term and the beginning of
the Summer.session. - Again, students who wish to
attend reunions of their high school alumni organi-
zations find it impossible to do so, because of a
schedule which keeps them here until June is half or
two-thirds gone.
By beginning school a week earlier in the fall and
adjourning it a week sooner in the spring, a week
of study in the crisp invigorating autumn is sub-
stituted for a week of school in the hot, uninspir-
ing weather of June. Such a change is highly ad-
vantageou's to all concerned, and it is to be hoped
that in the future the same policy will be followed
in arranging the University calendar.
Numbers by the Varsity band, by Tang and Ta-
vares, by Phil Diamond and Mike Chon, - and
then, after nearly an hour, the seniors sang. In the
future, it might be well to remember that a senior
sing is a senior sing, not a band bounce.
~ 2Tie Teleope
We'll Beat 'Em Yet
Today we play Ohio State,
They're out to win, me thinks.
So hack our team with all you've got,
And break that darn old jinks.
The Fourth one

The following is a story which has a fair chance
to win one of the prizes, providing the judges do
not play golf. You will easily see the reason for
this after reading this bit of fiction below.
THE FRUITLESS PLEA
Scotty Cl.eek, a hen-pecked husband, but neverthe-
less, the club golf champion, undergoes a thorough
physical examination.
"Are you sure that I am in first class condition"
he asked the doctor at its conclusion.
"Absolutely."
"Is my blood pressure normal?"
"It is perfect."
"Is my heart action regular?"
"Beyond a doubt."
"Lungs clear?"
"Clear as a bell."
"Kidneys functioning properly?"
"Splendid."
"Am I not bordering on a nervous breakdown ?"
"I see no signs of it."
"Gee, Doc, I'm sorry."
"Sorry for what ?"
"I thought you could find something the matter
with me so that I could go to Pinehurst for the sea-
son."
/ Good Sport
We will always claim that the drinks were on the
soda clerk who slipped while carrying a tray of badly
shaken milk-shakes. -
One to Think Over.
Do co-eds realize the power of the press?
UNCLE BEANIE.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
TIME TABLE
Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Lifuited and Express Cars-6:oo
a. in., 7:oo a. in., 8:oo a. m., 9:oo a. m. and
hourly to 9:o5 p. m.
Jackson IExpress Cars (local stops of Ain
Arbor)-9:47 a. m. and every two hours to
9:47 p. m.
Local Cars, East Bound-5 : 5a. in., 7:00
a. m. and every two hours to 9 :oo p. M;
i I :oo p. m. Tro Ypsilanti only-:: ::4o p. mn.,
I2:2 a. n., :1s a. n.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars, West Bound-7:50 a. M., 2:40
P. in.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars:
8:47, 10:47, a. in.12,:47, 2:47, 4:47 P. in.
To Jackson and ansing-Limited: 8:47
P. in.

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STRAP PUMPS

BRING YOUR PANAMA AND STRAW
HATS IN NOW TO BE CLEANED.
Prices for cleaning Panama's $1.25 up.
Prices for cleaning stiff
straws ................. .75 up.
We do only high class work.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792

Your wardrobe is not complete
unless you have a pair of our
white reinskin or buckskin oxfords
or pumps with low or ,medium
heels.
Priced from
$4.00 TO $1.50

Chop Suey
CHINESE AND
AMERICAN RESTAURANT
Quang Tung Lo.
613 E. liberty

II

Albert Ganwsi
Tine Custom Tailor-
ing Suits made to or-
der at Reasonable
Prices.

G ifts for

G raduation

7 9
Grahams
BOTH STORES

WAHR'S SHOE STORE
DOWN TOWN 108 SOUTH MAIN ST.
_ r
Your Trip Home Will Be
a R eal Treat
_ ar
if you make it in one of our cars.
Sell it upon your arrival and poss-=
ibly make a little besides. Any=
way you look at it you can't lose.=
s r
- -
- ~-
i YoUsed Trip epHrmeW llB
r s
- - a
a -r
417 E Huron Phone 2i58 Main Office: 207 E. Washington
i
ummannell itupn yonumarrval ndmpons' nu
r a.
Com anaokor tcvr
r a
_ a
r a
1.

113 S. Main St.

Second Floor

DANA E. HISCOCKI

DEALER IN

HARD And SOFT

COAL

WOOD AND COKE
Kentucky Egg, Pocahontas,
Manhattan Egg, West Vir-
ginia Lump, Solvay Coke,
G o od Clean Hard Coal.

PHONE 109F2

i

Are Students Willing to Pay
For Up-to-date Text Books?
Students are justified. in expecting the very latest material il
book form Mimeographed outlines or review questions or supple-
mentary readings are tangible instruments to work with and assist
one materially in grasping the subject.
Time wasted in the library waiting for books may be used to
advantage if these supplementary readings are incorporated into a
bound mirieogrgphed book (which may also be used as a note book).
Mimeographed text books may be revised each year without mak-
ing the cost to the student a burden. One hundred books may be
mimeographed at a lower rate than five hundred may be printed.

"The WRITE Gift"
BOXED WRITING PAPER FOR
GRADUATI ON
BINDS FRIENDSHIP CLOSER.
From the wealth of styles and
grades in our store you will find
it very easy to select the Boxed
Writing Paper that will reflect
the personality of the one you
wish to remember.
0. D. MORRILL.
17 NICKELS ARCADE
The Stationery and Typewriter Store

A hundred-page book costs between seventy-five cents and one
dollar twenty-five cents, depending upon the size of the classes.
Mr. Professor! Are you perfectly satisfied with the text or lab-
oratory manual you are using? Do you not feel that, by writing your
own book and revising it as suggestions are made in the class room
and from associates, within a year or two you can present your sub-
ject far better than you are at present?
Bring in your manuscript; let me know the enrollment of your
classes, tell your students where they may buy their text - that is all.
No risk, no trouble.
Come in and talk it over.

Edwards Bros.

Publishers

I-

308-310.SOUTH STATE STREET

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