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June 03, 1922 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-06-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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ENGLAND TO -HAVE
NEWAIR ROUTE
Plan Service. Connecting Australia
and India with British
Isles
WILL USE AIRSHIPS WHICH
WILL CARRY 100 PASSENGERS
(By mail Associated.Press)
Sydney, N. S. W., May 26.-Details
of the plan for the- establishment of
an Empire airship service between
Great Britain, India, and Australia
have been received by the Prime Min-
ister from Sir Joseph Cook, High Com-
missioner in London.
Six new airships, with a capacity of
100 passengers each,. will be built
under the scheme.
"Commander Burney and the Shell
Oil interests have made the govern-
ment an offer to take over airships
and sheds, build new ships and pro-
vide a weekly service to Australia at
fares less than present mail steamer
rates," sair Joseph said. "The syndi-
cate requires the British, Indian and
Australian governments to guarantee
the interest on its capital of three
million pounds sterling for ten years,
but it is estimated that the guarantee
will operate only for the first few
years. The French government 'is
willing to erect complete air stations
at Paris, Marseilles and in Tunis and
Algiers. The suggestion is subject tol
parliamentary ratification. s
Study of the upper air on lines never
before attempted in Australia will be
undertaken soon by the Common-
mealth Meteorological department, it
was announced coincidentally with
the receipt of Sir Joseph's message.
Aerial forecasts will be a regular fea-
ture and maps will be compiled for
the guidance of aviators. Pilot bal-
loons and sounding balloons will be
utilized in the survey.
POLICE UNABLE TO
GUARD CITY PARKS
"At the present time the police de-
partment is short seven officers and
as a result we haven't enough men
to station patrolmen in the city
parks," said Chief Chief Thomas
O'Brien of the Ann Arbor police de-
partment in answer to an editorial in
yesterday morning's Daily.
"The only officers who control the
city parks," he continued, "are those
of the city park department and it is
not their duty to prevent criminal as-
saults. If there were seven or eight
more police officers at the disposal of
the department we would be able to
have men patrolling the parks every
night, but with the present shortage
of men we can't hope to cope with
the situation."

1923 Cap Night
Can fe Celebrated
In Sleepy Hollow
With the delay in the building pro-
gram, those who prophesied that 1921
would see the last Cap Night in Sleepy
Hollow, found themselves mistaken.
Not only did the strains of "Where,
0 Where?" resound among the tra-
dition-laden hills last week, but next
year too, will find Michigan songs
ringing in the amphitheater.
"It will be impossible to have the
new hospital ready for patients by
next year," states Dr. Christopher G.
Parnall,. pressor of administrative
medicine and director of the Univer-
sity Hospital.
'25 and '26 will be able to boast
that they belonged to the great com-
mon fraternity of Michigan men who
have cast away in the twilight of
Sleepy Hollow the gray of the year-
ling to assume the red "end white of
the "gay young sophomores."
MATHEMATICS MEN
OBTAIN POSITIONS
Several seniors who have specialized
in financial, statistical and insurance
mathematics during the present year
have already received positions as ac-
tuaries, business executives and teach-
ers, announces Prof. James W. Glover
of the department of mathematics.
Many good opportunities are still open,
according to Professor Glover, but no
students have as yet applied 'for the
position.
The men whose applications have
been accepted, and the positions
which they will fill, are: Frank H. Lee
Jr., '22, actuary of the Maccabees, De-
troit. John Evans, '22, actuary of the
Ohio Mutual Insurance company, Cin-
cinnati, 0. Arthur N. Mathews, '22,
actuary for the Conservative Life In-
surance company, South Bend, Ind. D.
Ralph McClurg, '22, state actuary for
the department of insurance, Lincoln,
Nebraska. L. J., Menery, '22, assist-
ant manager of the Travellers' Insur-
ance company, Grand Rapids. Lloyd
Thompson, '22, actuary for the Nation-
al Fidelity Insurance company, Souix
City, Iowa. Floyd E. Young, '22, in-
structor in investment, statistical, and
insurance mathematical, in the Oregon
Agricultural college, Carvelis, Ore.
Clarence Stipe, '22, instructor in
mathematics in the University of
South Dakota, Vermillion, S. D. Bur-
ton E. Dunlop, '23, assistant in mathe-
mathics, in the University of Michigan.
William F. Poornman, assistant actu-
ary, Lincoln National Insurance co-
pany, Fort Wayne, Ind. Frances Flor-
er, '22, assistant general agent, Mutual
Benefit Life Insurance company, De
troit.
Eugene E. Parker, '22, Clifford H.
Falze, '22, and Joseph Linder, '22, are
considering several offers and expect
to be located definitely within a short
time.
u. S. CHES CHAMPION WINS
14 GAMES IN MATCH HEREF
Playing against seventeen students
simultaneously in a chess and checker
tourney and winning fourteen out of
the seventeen, was the record estab-
lished by Newell Banks of Detroit,
United States checker champion, at
the Union Thursday night. R. Wash-
burn, '25, defeated Banks in chess and
. Briggs, '25, was able to get a draw,
W. Firestone, '24, defeated Banks in
checkers.
The champion played at top speed,
finishing all games inside of three
hours.

STATE PHARMIC TO MEET
IN ANN ARBOR JUNE 0-0
PROMINENT SPEAKERS AIONG
THOSE TO TALK BEFORE
ASSOCIATION
The annual convention of the Mich-
igan State Pharmaceutical association
will be held in Ann Arbor this year
from June 6 to June 8. Convention
headquarters will be at the Union,
although there will probably be sev-
eral meetings in Hill auditorium and
at the School of Pharmacy as well.
Included int the list of speakers are
President Marion L. Burton, Prof.
William A. Paton, of the economics
department, speaking on "Business
Accounting." Lieut.-Col. A. H. White,
of the chemical engineering depart-
ment, talking on "Fixation of Nitrogen
and the Muscle Shoals Plant"; Prof.
Alexander Ruthven, director of the
museum of geology, discussing "The
Search for Drug Plants in South
America"; George R. Swain, official
photographer for the Kelsey expedi-
tion, telling of "Conditions in the Far
East"; W. A. McDonald, of the Con-
nor Ice Cream company, "The Manu-
facture and Sale of Ice Cream
President Henry J. Steining, of the
National Association of Drug Clerks,
and Secretary Samuel C. Henry, of
the National Association of Registered
Druggists.
THE UNIVERSITY'S
COMMON HEALTH
One pf the favorite superstitions
of the human race has been the
need of "Spring Tonic." Some of us
can remember how our grandmothers
used to dose us up, every spring, with
sulphur and molasses, sassafras,
"yarb tea," dandelion wine and other
home-made preparations that were
supposed to be of marvelous benefit.
Later on, as we outgrew these prep-
arations, the patent medicine faker
played on this belief of mankind and
put all kinds of sarsaparilla prepar-
ations on the market, put up in bot-
tles with beautifully printed labels and
alluring advertisements. These vari-
ous preparations, whether made by
grandmother over the kitchen stove
or by the patent medicine manufac-
turer in his big factory, were sup-
posed to "cool the blood," or "thin" it.
People thought that during the winter
their blood god thick and hot and that
it had to be properly diluted and copl-
ed. Like most of popular beliefs, there
is an element of truth in these old
superstitions. Just as the housekeep-
er cleans house in the spring and
drags out 4he winter accumulations
from closets and boxes, so we need
to air and ventilate our bodies after
the long winter. From November to
May, most of us have been sitting in-
doors too much, keeping the windows
closed too tight, wearing too heavy
clothing and eating too much heavy
food. We need to get out in the fresh
air "and sunlight, to get off our heavy
wraps, to let the sunlight and the air
come in contact with our skins, to
-OUT IN THE OPEN
--YOUR OWN BOSS
-MAKING MONEY
--THIS SUMMER

eat plenty of 'fresh : vegetables to
counteract the effect of too much -eat
and starch, and, most important of
all, to exercise our muscles and make
our skin' perspire freely. But to do
these things we don't need anything
out of a bottle. Hoeing the garden,
raking the lawn, beating thetcarpets
and shaking the rugs, all out in the
fresh air and the sunshine, are better
for us than all the spring tonics that
were ever bottled. Children, who are
still natural little animals, show their
longing for exercise by their eager-
ness to play out-door games, as soon
as spring weather comes. Often the
first sure indication of spring is the
appearance of the small boy with-his
ball and bat in the vacant lot, or the
chalk marks on the sidewalk that
show where little girls have been
playing hop-scotch. Why pay "one
dollar a bottle, six bottles for five
dollars" for something that will not
do you any good, when you can get
all the benefits you need out of fresh
air and sunshine, which cost you noth-
ing. Be like the animals and chil-
dren. Romp out doors. It doesn't
matter whether you do it with a golf
club or a hoe, a tennis racket or a
carpet beater, a flivver or a lawn
mover. It is the air and the sunshine
that count.
-From Health, May, 1922.
Adelphi Elects Officers
Officers for next semester .were
elected at the meeting of thidelphi
House of Representatives held Tues-
day night in University hall. John J.
Gould, '24L, was elected speaker, Don-
ald 0. Cook, '24, clerk, R. L. Alexan-
der, '24, assistant clerk, L. B. Wilson,
'23, sergeant-at-arms, and Wilfrid
Hocking, '24, oratorical delegate.

F LANDER
FOR
LOWER
Phone 294-B2 Phone 294-Fl
Branch Store, 715 N. University Ave. 320 E. Liberty St.

A Clear Mi nd
What you can do with your mind depends to such a
degree on what you have done to your stomach that you
cannot afford to be indifferent to what you eat. In eating
Shre" dded lWlieat
you have the assurance that you are eating 'a food that
-provides strength for body and mind with little digestive
effort and a food that is a distinct help in the elimination
of other foods. It is 100 per cent. whole wheat, steam-
ed and baked to a delicious flavor, and ready to eat.
Shredded Wheat is on the training table of
nearly every school and college in this country.
Shredded Wheat Co., Niagara Falls, N. Y.

Seventy-f ive
PalIm Beach

Suits

Prced as low as :Ten Dollars

'do

I

We have in our store at this time
75 PALM BEACH SUITS

which

we have priced to sell.

SUBSCRIPTION

COUPON

P. . Bursley, 917 Olivia street,
Aunn Arbor, Michigan.
It is hereby agreed by the
undersigned that a subscription'
if for less than eleven shares,
shall be due and payable at the
call of the properly authorized
officers of the St~re on and after
July 1, 1922;. and that if a sub-
scription is foran amount in ex-
cess of ten shares cash to the
amount of $100 shall be due and
payable on and after September
1, 1922.

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These are not "sale clothes" but
clothes of the standard quality

that always

comes

from our

store.

You should avail yourself

4t

Signed , .

SiwETAOINI'

e

The NUNN-BUSH Shoe for Men
Seniors

t .

::I
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I, (,

We offer men of the right sort
a rare opportunity to get into a
fine business of their own, dur-
ing summer vacations, renting
and selling Caille Motors and
Caille-motored boats,
At every lake and river resort,
there is a big demand for small
motored boats that can be rent-
ed by the day,
We will give you an exclusive
territory. You will have a fine
paying business, renting boats
-and motors at the start, andyou
soon build a permanent, very
profitable business, selling them
throughout your territory.
It is an ideal business - out in
the open - delightful surround-
ings - and profits that are only
limited by your ability to hustle.
We furnish everything neces-
sary to start the business. Only
a small amount of capital is re-
quired and that is thoroughly
safeguarded.
Write today for our complete de-
tails.
CAILLE
PERFECTION MOTOR
COMPANY --
Detroit, Mich.

'of the opportunity of getting one
of the suits at the present prices.
If you have never worn PALM
BEACH clothes you have a treat
in store for you. They are so
light, cool and comfortable -
just the thing for summer wear.

It is real economy to wear Palm
Beach clothes when you can buy
them at prices ranging from ten
to twenty-five dollars. With or-
dinary care a suit will wear for

These suits are priced at less than you
will be able to buy for in your home
towns. Let us show you how to save
your car fare home.-

Save your other
clothes this summer.
Be comfortable
wear Palm Beach

11

{
ti

I 1f

two seasons.

Slaok Calfskin

Brown Calfskin

I

What would be easier, men, than to " graduate from Michi-
gan " in a pair of "O. & H." oxfords ? Their comfort, style
and durability will, in the years to come, make you yearn for
Ann Arbor-and more 0. & H. shoes.
O'Kane & Hertler
FOOT FITTERS

Come Today! -A n early inspection lviii insure you a
much wider selection to choose from

J. KARL MALCOLM

335 S. Plain St.

To
Men

' d4oiv~

604 E. Liberty Street

ccf 11$Iit

First--Eco nomny

Arrays":

men

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