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June 03, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-06-03

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HE WEATHER
ROBABLY SHOWERS
TODAY

Lie iAnW

juatij

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY .ADD1NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

---

)L. XXXII. No. 179

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JUNE 3,1922

PRIG #TVZ

,~CF 'IF

D.S.U. HERE TODAY
FOR FINAL TILT
WITH WOLVERINES

MICHIGAN GOES TO THIRD
IF BUCKEYES SCORE
VICTORY

PLACE
A

FIVE VARSITY MEN PLAY
LAST BIG TEN CONTEST
Alumni Will Oppose Fshe's' Men in
'Two Games on Ferry- Field
June 16-17
Ohio State and Michigan meet at 4
o'clock this afternoon on the Ferry
field diamond in the final Conference
game of the year. Upon the outcome
of today's battle depends Michigan's
final standing in the Big Ten. A vic-
tory over the Buckeye nine will tech-
nically tie Wtchigan and Illinois for
first in games won and lost, although
the Illini will hold the lead by a slight
margin in the percentage column,
while defeat at the hands 6f the Scar-
let and Grey diamond aggregation will
drop the Wolverines into third place
behind Wisconsin.-
Today's game will be the last one
for the Varsity until commencement
week when the Alumni, aided by a
number of former luminaries of the
Ferry field diamond will match their
skill with Coach Fisher's men in two
games June 16 and 17. A change in
the time of the game this afternoon
from 2 to 4 o'clock has been arranged
to accommodate the students who are
taking examinations. The contest with
the Buckeyes will mark the passing of
ive Wolverine athletes from the field
qf Big Ten competition rfor Captain
Vipk, ;Kilton Dxon, Shorty Wimbles,
Dick, hultn and Eddie Klein will be
out for the last. time against a Confer-
ence competitor-
(ontinued on page Four)
COMMENCEMENT GESTS
TO SEE "POMANDE A
Senlor women will give a second
performance of "pomander Walk," the
annual Senilr Girls' play, at 6 o'clock
Friday night, Jne 16, at the Whitney
theater. It is customary for the Sen-
lor. Girls' play to be given during
gmmeycement wek so that almn
and other pomnnencement guests nay
haye the opportunty of attending the
piny. F
With the gonfidence ggine4 through
the public performance glyen Thtrsday
#ight, I day'1, an wit} the aditional
geh~grsals, the east 9f "lomander
Wa411 expects t be Ole t preent
the play in a miner superior to many
amateur productions.
At the previous presentation of
"Pomander Walk" the audience ex-
pv'essed appreciation with the way in
which the women carried the male
roles. Mildred Chase, as Sir Peter,
woh much praise for her interpreta-
tin of the "King of the alk.
Christine Murket playe4 lig part of
.ack Sayle sq reaistially tht the
'e lnne half of the a'ilenc fell in
loye with hr. Joyce " Crdy as
,adane Lah'snais an Ilidr Hn-
ry as Ma rjplain Lachesnai portrayej
two of the ferininO roles 'th espe-
ci 1 istinptio -
h0R p}a is wqyen abut seyerl sep-
arate lpve affairs carrie qn In uique
'aray. lizabeth Viekepy a Mrs. P9 -
ket thropgi he p ri0tecy in dir
S t'er and a44 cqnsierable to the
giegy of the play.
9inp'e th p1 is b ing givet by a
defision t tI he enior women made at
a meeting early in the semester the
committee requests that every senior
woman co-operate in the work of the
production in every way possible.
Orders for tickets may be mailed to
Mildred Chase at 718 Tappan Rd. A
self addressed and stamped envelope
should be included with the orde 'di
seats on the main floor will le 11 An
$1.50 and seats in the balcni wilf b
15 ceits, p a i$1>. ace wfl b
put 'on sare be inn g ue t ri4y y
4 4aha gooak stre n*w11 09
o. se'want14n } e}o a
rfgomi??anpe?? ??tpl'

NOTICE OF FINAL ISSUE
The Michigan Daily will pub=
lish its last issue for the pres-
ent year, Sunday morning. All I
"What's Going On" column no-
tices and other announcements I
should be in The Daily office be-
fore 6 o'clock Saturday night.

S.C.A.' WILL ELECT
TRUSTEES JUNE 8
In accordance swith the charter and
by-laws of the S. C. A. an election will
be held this Thursday, June 8, at the
S. C. A. to fill the vacancies which oc-
cur on the board of trustees at this
time.
The polls will be open from 9 o'clock
in the morning until 5 o'clock in the
afteinoon. All students who are mem-
bers of the Protestant churches or ad-I
herents thereto are eligible to vote
and should cast their ballots at this
time for the new trustees. This is the
annual general election of trustees
and at this time seven are to be,
elceted.
GIFITH'S ANSWERS
PLEASE LLOYD GEORGE,
SECRET. QUESTIONS PUT BY CAB-
INET DECLARED TO BE
SATISFACTORY
(By Associated Press)
, London, June 2,--With a touch of
the dramatic, similiar to that which
featured the signing of the treaty cre-
ating the Irish free state last Decem-
ber, negotiations between the British
government and representatives of the
Trish provisional regime tonight were
saved from a possible breakdown by
Arthur Griffith, president of the Dail
Eirann, making a last minute answer
to such questions put to him by the
British cabinet yesterday.
Premier Loyd George announced
this morning that he was sure that
the tren'd of the Irish situation would1
permit his departure for Criccieth for
the week end. Then he gathered mem-
bers of the cabinet around him and
waited all day for the reply of the
Irish leader. The questions were re-
ceived at 8 o'clock this evening. The
premier decided that the answer was
satisfactory and he immediately de-
parted for Wales. He will return to
London Tuesday wheim the conference
will be resune.
The questigns the British govern-
ment asked have nqt beep made pbli
but it is understOd they qncerned the
drafting of the Irih free state con-
stitution and related tq the treaty.
GEOLOGISTS NOLLED FOR
SUMMER CMP IN SOUTH
Enrollment fgr the (eglogy sumnmer
camp tq be held this summer at Mills
Springs has hee complete4, it was
stated by Prof. P. 0. auer gf the ge-
graphy depprtment yesterday. Pgfs
sor ggqer is il clarge of the camp this
suimer. The engllment has been lim
Ited to 36 people and most of these be-
ing Michigan students but there are
several advanced students in geology
attending the camp from other col-
leges this year.
The trip planned is a very extensive
one and will occupy the whole of the
six weeks of the Summer sesiqn, ' h
party will assemblp .t Legingtop, Iy.,
on Jun. 20, then prgeeding to the
permanent i cation of the a'n4, whsre
they will stay for , mgnt . trit is
,planned which will cgver the Great
Smoky mquntaim and the country
surrounding Wnoxvile, Te 4. The
'camp will gorclue it sessin with a
trip to Phatangogg were the forma-
tion of the surrquning country will
be studied.
TENNIS TEAM LEITF

FOR CHICAGO MEET
Michigan's Varsity tennis team left
last night for Chicago for the closing
match of the .year. Captain Merkel,
George Reindel, qr., 4ohann' Roic m,
and Fred erico anche m ae gp th
team that will pily thg lar ons. Up,
to the Dreset tire, } a Yxsity Pim:
ferene sla is clean ang the ne 4erp
of the teem T.e 4eter Ii e4 that it wlll
remgji p "
Chicgoq h g had a successful year
and with Stagg and Frankenstein the
Conference doubles champions have
a team that will offer the Michigan
doubles team some trouble. Franken-
stein will play number one, Stagg
number two, DeSwarte three,* a 1
Gates four. Michigan will lay i t~e
same ordr lre have eeu play-
ing of Jt;"
The team will return to Ann Arbor
immediately after the match. It will
meet the faculty in a ;atch dgrig
Commenceent vo.

Officials Confer with
Which Offered
Bids

UNVRIYREADY
TO START BUILDING

Detroit
Lowest

WORK ON PHYSIOLOGICAL,
LABORATORY TO BEGIN SOON
University officials have already
taken action toward the completion
of building contracts following the
approval of funds given. Thursday by
the state administrative board.
Seretary S. W. Smith and Super-
visor of Building Plans John F. Shep-
ard left for Detroit yesterday, where
they were to make arrangemnts with
Christman and company, contractors,
for the drawing up of contracts for
the new engineering laboratory and
shops, and the model high shool.
The Detroit company submitted the
lowest bids for both buildings.
Two Buildings This Year
The enginering shops aid labora-
tory, for which more than' $700,000 of
the fund is required, will be located
east of the present Engineering build-
ing ,on property lying between Church
street and East Univrsity. The struct-
ure is to stand on the area formerly
covered by six houses between the
business blocks facing on South Uni-
versity and the old Tappan school.
More than $500,000 of the appropri-
ation will be expended on the new
practice high school, the first unit of
which will be south of South Univer-
sity, between East University and Hav-
en avenues. This new building will
not front diretly on South University,
for the caihpus frontage will be used
for another building of the School of
Education.
Will Enlarge Laboratory
Work on the enlargement of the
Physiological laboratory will begin as
soon as the school year is completed.
At present the laboratory accom-
modates 60 students but the space is
entirely too inadequate. Students
work in pairs, and often in groups of
four and eight. On such occasions
the room is gverly crowded making
good class worm difficult. Under the
new plans, small roonms will be on-
structed so that when group work is
necessary the discussions will be en-
abled to be carried on without being
hindered by the work of other groups.
SCOUACHRIPRIGTO
I EBIBIjE " WILL CONTAIN INFOR-
MATION FOR INCOMING
STUDENTS
Announcement of the managing edi-
tor and the business manager of the
1922-23 freshman handbook was made
at the S. C. A. yesterday by Rohert
E. Adams, Jr., '23, president'
Bowen F. Schumaher, '24L, will
edit pet year's publication and Rus-
sell S Persing, '23, will attend to the
business ed. The "bible" will be
approimately the same size as last
year'-s, containipg a lit of authoriz-
ed Michigan traditions, a calendar of
important events, and in addition a
review of some of the more prom-
inent nmpus activities
A section will ?Qso be given over to
the local ehrhe and there will be a
review of wonmen aetivites on the
campus. An address from the Pres-
ident to the incoming freshmen and
friendly adye from upperclassmen
will be numbered among the features
of the publication.
Distribution of the "bibles" will be
cared for at the general registration
next fall and a .sufficient number will
be printed so that all members of the
incoming freshman class as well aj
students transfering to, the University
for their first enrollment will be pr-
vided fog.
R. 0. '. Q. SIEK PERMANENT
9UAIRTE1$ FOR NEXT YEAR

With the transferring of the auto-
motive laboratory to its new location
adjoining the engineering shops, the
R. 0. T. C. offices Were also moved
to another location in the new Engin-
eering building.
It is expected, however, that next
year the R. . (T*.l headquarters will
be ceptgrel in one of the buildings op-
pgsite the campus on South University
avenue where the Cousin's and Hall
.ofices now are. This will be the per-
manent home of the R. 0. T. C. uits
here and a larger floor area and bet-

Firm

HOOSIERS WIN WAY1
TO TENNIS FINAS
Sagalowsky and Dixon, Both of Short-
ridge, Will Contest in Singles
and Doubles
DISPLAY BEST HIGH SCHOOL
PLAYING AILITY SEEN HERE
Finals in both singles and doubles
of the Interscholastic tennis tourna-]
ment have been reached. Julius Saga-
lowsky and Guy Dixon, both of Short-!
ridge high school of Indianapolis,
have won their way to the finals and
will fight it out with one another for
the title. These two players are also
paired together in the doubles and
will meet Frank O'Connell and Ru-
dolph Mulfinger of Hyde Park High
school of Chicago in the finals of the
doubles. The matches will com-
mencepromptly at 9:30 o'clock this
morning, the singles to be played
first, to be followed shortly after by
the doubles.
At no time before have two high
school players of such high caliber as
Sagalowsky and Dixon beencseen on
the Ferry field courts. These two men
play a brand of tennis that is worthy
of the most finished player. They are
among the most promising younger
players In the country.
Their games are particularly soundI
and their headwork is faultless. Botht
chop and stroke in good form, volley
remarkably, well, serve with force andt
accuracy, and have the -necessary
control to make them steady, sure
players. They do not have the com-t
mon fault among younger players of
being wild and possessing but one
stroke.t
k Defeats Detroiterst
Sagalowsky, the national boy's
champion of the United States, won
two singles matches yesterday fromt
McLetchie of Detroit Northwesternt
and Harris of Detroit Central, respec-,
tively. The former was beaten 6-2,1
6-3, and the latter 6-2, 6-1. He wast
not extended in either of these
matches,
Dixon won his matches with evenI
more ease. Jerome of Eastern, one of
Detroit's best younger players, was
beaten in two love sets. O'Connell of
Hyde Park, Chicago, went down to ar
61, 6-3, defeat,
When these two players meet in thet
finals this morning one of the best
matches ever seen on Ferry fieldt
should result. It would be hard toI
pick from the two.1
Meet Illinois Champ
Another interesting match will be
the finals in the doubles, OkConnell
and Mufinger o O1-yde Park are the
nterscholastic champions of Illinois.t
When they cross racquets with Dixon
and Sagalowsky after the singles
match a battle royal will result. On
the way to the finals yesterday, O'Con-
nell and Mulfingr beat Jerome and
Baker of Detroit Eastern and Marshall1
-nd Shields of Detroit Northern. Dix-
>n.and Sagalowsky put out Goldsmitht
and Cleary of Northern and BaldwinE
and Reed of Albion.
Last night the visiting tennis play-
ers were entertained at a banquet att
the Union by the Athletic association.
Talks were delivered by Prof. Arthur
E. Boak, Charles Merkel, Johann Ror-
ich, and J. R. Kuebler, the faculty
representative of the Shortridge High
school. George Reindel, Jr., acted as
toastmaster.
Sheepskins Take
Half Mle Ribbon
Commencement does not signify a
time of joy for everybody. For somet
few of the employes of the University
commencement means an immense
amount of labor. The people referred'
to are those who have the job of pre-

paring 1,550 diplomas for the members
of the class of 1922.
Not so very many years ago one
person was able to attend to all the
details of this task. At the present
time, excluding printers, engravers,
and those whose signature is re-
quired to make the document valid, a
staff of more than 10 persons is re-,
quired for the routine work alone.
Slightly more than 3,500 feet, or
three-fifths of a mile, of yellow and
blue ribbon will be required to enue
circle the documents. ApproximatesI
ly 3,000 square feet of sheepskin will
be used for the diplomas proper. One
wonders how many sheep are f oreed
to, sacrifice their lives yearly to this
cause. A substitute for the genuine
article will have to be found within
a few years if we are to continue
wearing woolen clothes.
By far the most laborious task con-
nected with tha preparation is the at-
fixipg of signatures. More than 8,000
of them, counting those of the School
of Education, are necessary. Of these,
President Burton and Secretary Smith
each sign over 1,500.

ENGINEERS LEAVE
FOR CAMP DAVIS
Nine engineering faculty members
and 64 engineering students will be
among the members of the University
to attend the first session of the Davis
engineering camp, in Cheboygan coun-
ty. Students in forestry and land-
scape gardening will also attend the
camp.
Prof. C. N. Johnston, of the depart-
ment of geodesy and surveying, di-
rector of the camp, arrived there yes-
terday with several -staff members.
The main body of students left the
city last night and will be settled in
camp this noon. The Summer session
courses offered at camp will com-
mence Monday.
JUNIORIZITS PUBLISH
ANNUAL CLASS BOOK

PAMPHLET
OF '23

COVERS
MEMBERS
YEAR

ACTIVITIESf
DURING

Again the class of 1923 has shown
its individuality by putting out an-
other class book, this time entitled,
"The J-Lit Class Book." Last year, as1
sophomores, they edited a sophomore
year book.
The book, which is edited by Leo J.
Hershdorfer, Paul Watzel, Herbert S.
Case, and James Hume, came off the
press yesterday. The copies were1
mailed last night, and shodld be re-
ceived by the class members not later
than Monday. ss
The book Is a neat pamphlet with a,
cover in colors by J. W. Robertson,,
portraying a student vho is apparent-
ly "getting up his stu'"-at least that
is the title of the book under his arm.
An editorial by Paul Watzel explainst
that the purpose of the book is to make -
the juniors realize their obligations
as class members and students, "tor
point out that there is still much work3
to be done, and to spur them on to
g'reater efforts."
President Burton's letter to the class
is an appeal to them to show them-
selves real leaders next year.
"Your period of tutelage is over,"
says President Burton, and farther
along in the letter, "We have the high-l
est confidence in your ability to meet
these tests."
Herbert S. Case has written an ar-'
ticle of the same sort as President'
Burton's, entitled "The Home Stretch"'
He concludes, "The next year is yur
last at the fountain of class room
knowledge-so drink deeply."
Hardy Hoover's poem, "The Simile;"
compares the class to a runner in a
hurdle race, about to run the last lap.
"The J-Hop," by Leo J. Hershdorf-
er, is a review of the annual classic.
He records the history of this event
and points out that if the class of '23
had not shown that the hop could be
a well conducted affair, it would have
been discontinued, probably perman-
ently.
QUOTA FOR BIOLOGYa
CAMP NEARLY FILLED
The quota of men who can be taken{
care of at this year's biology camp is
within two me of being filled, at the
present time 48 having signified their
intention of attending. Accommoda-
tions for 50 men as a. mximum have
been put in readiness for the opening
of camp on June 26, however, accord-
ing to Prof. G. R. LaRue, director of
the camp, 54 men can be accommodat-
ed in an emergency.
With the expansion of the work cov-
ered throughout the six week's course,
and with the Increase in the number
of students, the size of the camp has
been increased proportionately. Dur-
ing the spring months four new build-
ings have been erected, two of which
will be used as living quarters for
the students, one will be the head-
quarters for the health service, as well
as a hospital, and the last will be used
as a general warehouse. Mrs. P. S.
Welch has been seured for the term
and will serve as director of the hos-
pital

RAIL LABORHAD
MEET TUESDAY FOR
WILL DISCUSS CONCERTED ACTION
OVER REDUCING
SALARIES
EVERY ORGANIZATION
TO TAKE STRIKE VOTE
"Acception or Rejection of Decision
Rests with Membership,"
Jewel Says
(By Associated Press)
Chicago, June 2.-- Heads of 11
railway labor unions will gather In
Cincinnati Tuesday when the confer-
ence on wage reduction, called by P.
P. Jewell, president of the railway
employes department of the American
Federation of Labor, goes into session.
Union representatives of all classes
of railway labor which come under the,
decisions issued by the railroad labor
board, ordering feduction of wages,
will discuss concerted action in sub-
mitting the matter to their member-
ship. .
Strike votes are expected in every
organization, it was added, each union
taking its vote separately according
to its own constitution.
"The question of acceptance or re-
jection of the decision rests entirely
with the membership of the different
organizations," said Mr. Jewell to-
day. "Decisions reducigg wages
which are today insufficient to provide
the bare essentials of family life are
of such vital importanec to the em-
ployes affected that there can be no
question about the duty of the union'
executives to submit the matter to
them in such a way that they may
determine upon the action which will
best protect their interests."
Unions to be represented are the
six shop crafts, the clerks, signal
men, telegraphers, maintenance of
way, and stationary firemen and oil-
ers.
The train and engine service men
which include the Big Four brother-
hood and the switchmen were not af-
fectedand will not participate.
The additional slash of $600,000,000
or more accepted through a decision
covering 500,000 shop men was not an-
nounced by the board, although the
decision was said to be practically
completed.
(Special to The Daily)
Boston, Mass., June 2.-Two stu-
dents of the University of Michigan,
Gerald Overton and Brewster Camp-
bell will gain practical newspaper ex-
perience during the summer in the of-
fice of the Christian Science Monitor
in Boston.
These men were recommended b
the School of Journalism of the Unt-
versity of Michigan for their ability-
and will work in various departments
of the Monitor. Two students from
the Columblia School, of Journalism
will also be connected with the Mon-
itor during the summer.
BURTON TO SPEAK
IN WEST VIRGINIA.
President Marion L. Burton left last
night for Morgantown, W. Va., where
he will deliver the baccalaureate ad-
dress at the University of West Vir-

ginia tomorrow.
President Burton will also deliver
the commencement address at Culver
Military academy, Culver, Ind., on
Tuesday. He will return to Ann Ar-
bor next Wednesday.
Must Call For Reception Tickets
Of the 225 tickets for the annual
senior reception, all but 82 have been
disposed of, according to the chairman
in charge of the lit school tickets.
The chairman of the ticket committees
for the other schools and colleges
must call for their allotments at the
Michiganensian office between 9 and
12 o'clock this morning, if they ex-
pect to get tickets.

PROF. EDMUNSON REPORTS
ON ACCREDITED SCHOOLS
At a meeting of the committee on
diploma schools held yesterday, Prof.
J. B. Edmurison, University inspector
of state schools, gave a report of his
recent Investigation of the act'etlttod
school list ;
It is Professor Edmunson's duty to
keep contact with all of the schools
from which the University takes stu-
dents on diploma recommendation and
see that they keep up the required
scholastie standard.

3
3
3

'I
t

BASEBALL GAME AT 4 P. M. I
The 0. S. U.-Michigan baseball I
game will be called on Ferry I
field at 4 o'clock this afternoon.
The game was incorrectly an-
announced for 2 q'chek in ad- I
vance notices.

ter officep and classroom facilities
uthus b provided.

will

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