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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 20, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-04-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

un -

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is.

ressed

tein
Jr.
ung

jr.

C~oates
Rein'del
Vickery
t.Mciss

Carl Lundgren, Illinois baseball coach, sometime,
of Michigan, eliminated the first difficulty when he
stated that specialization would be the., remedy,
meaning that the training of one man for one :o
sition would shorten the period of training. The
second obstacle could be taken care of by a slight
change in Conference rules. The third objection
does not exist here at least, since, sixty-seven per
cent of the summer school students at Michigan
last year attended the regular sessions also.
The truth is thatsome strong unifying interest is
needed by summer school students as well as reg-
ular term students. Such an interest would be ef-
ficiently supplied by competitive sports. School
spirit, brought about by healthy rivalry, is essential
to college life. Summer schoco is as much a part
of college as the regular term, or ,_t least it is rap-
idly becoming so, and rivalry is needed to strengthen
school spirit then as well as at an, other time.
"Sooner or later it will have to corn," If that is
so, why not this summer?
SPEAKING FOR THE RED HEADS
Red headed people are expected to derive much
consolation from a recent editorial in the Detroit
Free Press, entitled, Comfort for the Auburn-
Haired". Therein the writer points out that per-
sons afflicted with- sorrel-topitis no longer need be
"objects of ridicule", inasmuch as the naval militia'
in New York has announced that it prefers men
with red hair and big ears for radio operators. "{So
it is that the long-derided red head is in a fair. way
to fill an important niche in world affairs," giggles'
the envious editorial writes- with an assumed air
of sympathy.
The Free Press seems to pity the red head, but it
need not do so. Red heads long since have filled
many places -bigger than niches in world affairs.
Jefferson was red headed; so were Shelley and Nel-.
son. Furthermore, though red headed youngsters
are caused much discomfiture by the derisioil of
their playmates, that annoyance does not endure.
Once the
"Red head, ginger bread,
Five cents a cabbage head"
days are passed, the auburn haired ceases to regard
his or her locks with "anger and grief", and, like.
the drunken man, comes to consider himself or
'herself the one normal individual in. the universe.
The florid top knot no longer causes self-conscious-
ness and blushes of shame; that embarrassment has
been left behind, with pantaloons and ginghams.
Red heads may feel grateful to the Free Press for
its thoughtful consideration. But newspapers really
have no cause to trouble themselves about such
matters. Red heads are in no need of solace; on the
contrary, they are perfectly capable of looking after
themselves.
Ask President Burton.
Looks as if the League of Nations has accom-
plishe'd a miracle in making its territorial grants.
To quote from The Daily of Tuesday, April r8:
"Poland arrived last week 4 Ann Arbor."
Big joke: students pay two bits for Gargoyle.
7ie Telescope.

AT

/

GRAHAM'S

I r
I

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ant Arbor and Jackson
TJIME TABLE
(!ostorn Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars - 6:0o
a. m, 7:o at. o. 8;.o a. m., *:e. a. m. and
hourly to g :op. .
, " Cas .(localstops of Ann
Arbor), 0:47 a. mL and 'every two hours to
9:47 p. W.
vocal cars east Bound-3:5g a.W .7:0 a
Mn and eVtwo haurs t* p:"o.p. im.,. uaca,
P. a. To psilanti aly-* .:,. p.,: 1:2
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cara West ouad-7 :e a. a., "s4a
v. m.
To Jackson and £alaiaszo--Amitedcar:
6:47. 10:47, a. m., 92:47, 24:,:47.
To Jackson and Laing - IAated: 8:47
W. daa.

f

Drink
More

f

Milk
COFFEE.

AND LESS

Milk is food for the brain. Try
putting yourself on a milk diet and
see how much better you feel in
the course of a few days.

REGIONAL

1922
S IC
~2 3
9 1i4
16 17

APRIL
T W

4
I1.
18

SUPPLIES

5
12
19

1922
T F S
1
6 ? 8
13 14 15
20 21 22
2? 28, 20

wy

Jr.
son
trer

so
HATS - SPRING - HATS
Reblocked at greatly reduced prices.
Turned inside ont, with all new trim.
mings they are as good as new. High
claMs work only.
FACTORY NAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
. Telephone 1792
Chop Suey
CHINESE AND
AMERICAN RESTAURANT
Quag Tung Lo.
613 E. liberty

The Ann Arbor I
p TON16 423
t a
UNITED CIGAR
SPECIAL PIPE 5
$4.oo Aonian Pipes made in France cut to
Milano Pipes, Italia Root choice -
Real Cougo Pipes, cut to - -
$5.oo Prince of Wales Pipes, cut to -
$1.5o Realite Peicils this sale while they last
3oc Tbbacco Pouches; cut to -
r.5o Locktite Pouches going at -
75c Cigaratt Cases [leather] cut to -
16 oz.jar Tobaccos $1.45 Tins
We have installed, the latest Base Ball Ticke
your convience come in and make your self t
118 EAST HURON S

a

or-

s 1r

nat,
been
satis-
ivid-
and

f

0-

II

I.

situa-
a man
Wayne
college

ooo-% --

°ts
of
and
fac-
- or
tice
of
ent
he-
be
t is

O Ternpora! 0 Co-Education!
She sits across from me in class
As-in vain I try to absorb the words
Of the wise, with a stare so deep
That it appears vacant.
She too is diligent,
Writing, writing, all the hour,
Never looking up fromher notebook
Until the time arrives
When she has completed
Her daily correspondence.
Often have I tried to write letters
In class, buttthe professor's voice
Bothers me too much'...
When the marks come out next June
The girl who sits across froim me
Will get an "A"
Because she was so diligent
While my report will bear an extra "E"
Because I was conscientious
And couldn't learn to write letters
In class.

But he's really trying out
for Sales .Mna

:x

1

to

:ss of
t, but
o en-
i the,
self-
legal
e du-
a re-
h col-

I

0It

e to come." 1his was
net by Dean Edward
e sion regarding The
tercollegiate summer
by the summer news-
ided for athletic con-
n teams representing
erence universities.-
able interest at the
.1 and the Daily Illini
rly, and both were
Guy S. Lowman,
endorsed the idea, as
linois and Yost of
on to the plan arose
icability came up.. It
leveloping teams was
etition, would have to

Signs of the Times
Notice posted on cemetery at Wayne: "THIS
CEMETERY CLOSED FOR BURIAL".
"Golf club" exclusiveness is evidently being car-
ried even to the happy hunting grounds.
Digging Up Trouble
Head ine in The Daily some time ago:
"AUSTRIAN EMPEROR CRITICAL"
Headline the next day:
":AUSTRIAN EMPEROR DIES"
We understand that because of this sequence of
headlines a number of our prominent campus
Menckens and so forths are haviig themselves in-
oculated.
Hey, Everybody!
. Some may have noticed in yesterday's colyum
that the only difference between the Dexter Noah
and the-one in the Bible is that the former is inter-
ested in geometry. He has been building an "are"
wihile the original Noah occupied himself with
something more tangible.
Famous Closing Lines
"I haven't the guts to play any more," said the
violinist as his last string broke. ERM.

WT HE freshman who comes out for baseball
manager and who sticks is learning a lesson
which, whether or not it wins that honor for him,
should win some honors in after life.
He will learn that his plugging on the diamond,
his efforts four years hence to get the upper hand
on his first job, and after that his striving to climb
into the -managerial and t executive class are all
part of the same game.
Now, just as ten years from now, he will have
to do many things that are hard, many things that
are unpleasant. The more willing he is, the more
work will other men put upon him. But by that
he grows.
The rewards after college are given on about the
same basis as now. Theygo to the man who besides
doing his main job well, still has the time to reach
out after other work and the spirit that masters it.
Here is where this comes home to you. Don't
be content with standing high in the classroom.
Support your college activities and go after some
campus honors too. This broadening of your
interests will become a habit that in after life will
prove a mighty big help.

Published in
the interest of Elec.
tricat'Devilopment by
an Institution that will
be helped by what-
ever helps the
ndustry.e ,

s °t

Electric Ca

Since 1&69 makers and distributors o/,lerica
Ufkc77a/e'qzipment

I

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