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April 20, 1922 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-04-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-1I

agner, the great-
ory of opera, and
innhauser" which
the last May Fes-
born at Leipzig,
ungest .of a fam-
His father was a
:s. and his mother

nine c]
in thec

Club Visits live
fichigan Cities
China, Japan, India, the Philippines,
Hawaii, Mexico, and South Africa,
were represented in the Cosmopolitan
club spring trip through Michigan.
The club visited around Graild Rap-
ids, Battle Creek, Kalamazoo, Lansing,
and Flint. In all of these cities the
students were entertained by local
clubs and iidustrial plants.
At Battle Creek the club were en-
tertained at luncheon at the Postum
Cereal plant, and- after the dinner
were shown through the factory. The
students also visited two other fic-
tories and were entertained at a ban-
quet at the Battle Creek sanitarium."
Kalamazoo college and the Normal
school -Were visited while at Kalama-
zoo, and the rotarians were hosts at
a luncheon. At Grand Rapids a fur-.
niture plant, a filtration plant, and fac-

tories for making leather machinery-1
belt clips, and auto tires were in- .
spected.
ELECTRIC COMPANY
OFFER S POSITIONS
Seniors in any department of the
University who are interested In non-
technical positions offered by the'
General Electric company, Schenec-:
tady, N. Y., can receive personal in-

formation regarding these positions by
making an appointment with C. H.
Lang, '15, who will be in Ann Arbor
May 1.
The General Electric company has
for several years ,conducted a' com-
prehensive course in business ,train-
ing,, which is open to all university
graduates who are interested in ,ac-
counting, financial and administrative
activities, and who can meet the re-
quirements as to adaptability.
Those interested shodld communi-
cate with Mr. Lang at Schenectady.

Fragrant Blend
steadfast friend,
rich and mellow
as old wine;
every day
more men say
In-COM-pa-ra-bly fine!

father died, and two
mother niarried Lud-
r, playwright and por-
whom Wagner became
s Intellectual
agner did not display
r studies although he
llectual. Ancient his-
nythology, and Shakes-
s fascinated him. He
mance and delighted in
al. His love of music
ed by the hearing of

STUDENTS' SUPPLY STORE
1111 South University Ave.
Engineers' and Architects' Materials
Stationery Fountain Pens Loose Leaf Books
Cameras and Supplies

ti

'I

Candies

Laundry Agency

Trobaccos

__ - . .

first opera,
-Lytton's novel,
Dresden in 1842
genment as con-
m opera. This
yerbeer's brilli-
d by "The Fly-
nnhauser," each
remendous ad-
ding work In
d to Switzerland
i the revolution,
was given in his
ction of Liszt in
Favor
trising from the
win widespread
7t to an end in
aken under the
dwig of Bavaria.I

A

Business

Statement that

1,

a Great Human Record

.,

HELPING 19,000,000 PEOPLE
About 19,000,000 people are in-
sured ii the Metropolitan - over
16,000,000 under weekly premium
policies. The weekly calls of
Agents at the policy-holders' homes
provide a wonderful opportunity
for health and welfare work.
The Company has accepted the
opportunity and to-day is at the
forefront of public health work in
America.

HOW WAS IT DONE?
Records kept by the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company show an ex-
traordinary decrease in the death rate among its Industrial, or weekly ,pre-
mium,.policy-holders. Comparing 1921 with 1911, for example, there were
55,ooo less deaths in 1921 than there would have been if the 1911 death rate
had prevailed.
What brought about the great saving of life?
The general public health movement-progress in medical science ~ad
sanitation-other causes, perhaps. But a very great factor has been the tre-
mendous health campaign carried on by the Metropolitan itself. This page
tells a part of the story.

r

I'OR THE NATION'S HE
144 health exhibits and en
cy hospitals at county fai
year; 295 "Clean-up" cam:
agitation by Agents for hea:
islption; nation-wide can
against special diseases; s
and sanitary surveys; a si
municipal health depari
leadership of practically all
ican research work relating
fiuenza-these are some in
of the Metropolitan's acti
the interest of pub~lic healtl

his

I

as

14,000,000 VISITS BY TRAINED
NURSES

prehensible. Today, the world knows
better. Practically all. of 'Wagner is
now in the repertory of our largest
opera houses, and his works never
fail to dr'aw. large and appreciative
audiences. His influence upon such
composers as Verdi, Ponchinelli, Mas-
cagni and Puccini has been very mark-
ed. Indeed, Wagner revolutionized
the form of the opera.

Free, nursing service is given to
Industrial policy-holders in 2,800'
cities and towns. Trained nurses
not only heal the sick but teach
right living.aAbout 14,000,000Ais-
its have been made - 2,116,875 in
1921 alone. Numerous letters tell
of lives saved.

IMETROPOLITAN n
Life Insurance ompan
Incorporated by the State of New York. A Mutual Company'
HALEY FISK , President FREDERICK H. ECKER, Vice-Preside

Assets

Business Statement, December 31, 1921
.t .y. .t$1,115,583,024-54
Larger than those of any oilier insurance Company in, the World.

.

Increase in Assets during 1921 . . . . . $ 134,669,937.37
Larger than that of any other Insurance Company in the World.

here.

Huron

Vr }

;.

first

DISCOVERING DISEASE IN TIME
Free medcal examinations oftenf
disclosing insipient disease in, time
to cure it, aregranted to Ordinary
(annual premium) policy-holders,
subject to reasonable conditions.
HELPING THE EMPLOYER
TO HELP
Employers insuring their em-
ployees under Group policies are
advised regarding health conditions
and accident prevention, while the
employeessreceive the benefits of
nursing service and welfare liter-
ature.
238,000,000 PIECES OF
LITERATURE
Attractive booklets and pamph-
lets in great variety, dealing with"
the important phases of health and
disease, and prepared by leading
experts, are distributed broadcast.
So far, 238,000,000 copies have been.
distributed - 25,000,000 in 1921..
In addition, 18,000,000 copies of
The Metropolitan, a health maga-
zine, are issued annually.
A CITY THAT IS WATCHED
In Framingham, Mass, the Metro-
politan is leading the way in a
great experiment, watched by health
authorities throughout the country,
to demonstrate what proper muni-
cipal health regulation can do.
Deaths from tuberculosis have
dropped from 121 per 100,000 to 40,
per annum.

Liabilities

$1,o68,341,845-04

Surplus . . . . . . . . . . $ 47,'4I,179.50
Income in 1921 . . . . . . . . $ 301,982,699 39
Larger thanthat of any other Insurance Company inM the World.
Gain in 1921 . . . . . . . . . $ 38,462,919.41
Larger than that of any other Insurance Company in the World.
Total Insurance places and paid in 1921 . . $1,564,789,607
More than has ever been placed in one year by any other Company in the World.
Gain in Insurance in Force in 1921 . . . . $ 625,695,325
Greater than that of any other Company in the World.
Total Amount of Ouststanding Insurance . . . $7,500,707,839
Larger than that of any o her Company in the World.
Ordinary, (that is, exclusive of Industrial) Insurance in Force $3,892,267,274'
Larger than that of any other Company in the World.
Number of Policies in Force December.31, 1921 . . 25,542,422
More than that of any other Company in America.
Number of Policy Claims paid in 1921 . . . . 323,531
Averaging one claim paid,-for every 27 seconds of each business day of 8 hours
Amount paid to Pplicy-holders in 1921 . . . . $91,348,472.98
Payments to policy-holders averaged $630.16 a minute of each business daN' of 8 hours.
Dividends to Policy-holders payable in 1922, nearly . $ "16,opo,ooo
Amount paid Policy-holders and Beneficiaries since Organiza-
tion, plus Amount now Invested for their Security . $2,047,692,135.07
GROWTH IN TEN-YEAR PERIODS

i
1
'Qt 1
3
1
i
1

HOMES FOR 17,744 FAn
In the investment of it
the. Metropolitan is now
preference to loans which
housing. During 1920 an
the Company made and
loans of $68,080,017, on nev
ings and new apartment
providing homes for 17,74
lies.

GREAT DECLINE
DEATH RATES

PUBLIC APP

)ne
3-i

The death rate among- Ind
policy-holders reached its
point in 1921 - 31.9% lowe
n 1'11. The rate from typh
creased 71%; tuberculosis
Bright's disease, nearly 30'
fectious diseases of children
ly 37%. The Expectation o
of white males (reckoned fr(
10) increased 4 years.

The American people have
the Metropolitan the greate
insurance company in the
with-,$7,005,707,839 insurar
force.
It leads not only in Ind
but in Ordinary. More tha
of its business in force is Or
- $3,892,267,274 - which .s
than that of any Company
world.

a

nch to

ke

ong.
alads

No. Policies'°)utstanding
Year Income for Assets at End Surplus at End in Force at End nsurance at Year
Year of Year of Year of Year nd of Year
Dec. 31, 1891 $11,423,496.68 1891.. $13,626,948.21 1891. .$3,088,833.18 1891.$2,281,640 $ 258,707,763 1891
Dec. 31, 1901 38,017,163.59 1901.. 74,771,758.56 1901.. 9,938,694.23 1901. 6,234,302 1,076,977,204 1901
Dec. 31, 1911 98,135,273.71 1911.. 352,785,890.36 1911..32,939,469.87 1911.12,007,138 2,399,878,087 1911
Dec. 31, 1921 301,982,699.39 1921..1,115,583,024.54 1921. .47,241,179.50 1921.25,542,422 7,005,707,839 1921
The Company issues policies from a Hundred to a Million Dollars of Insur-
ance.
In fact, its Ordinary is now larger than its Industrial.
The Company also issues Health and Accident Policies-minimum $5,ooo.

THE FUTURE
The Metropolitan' will con
ts endeavor to offer the best
is in life, health and accidex
surance, and to save human
Continued growth will giv(
Company still greateropportu
to serve the American peon
insurance protection and ii
conservation of life and hea

ndwiches

'ruit

0

inks

GREATEST-

6.'«

fllghty
709 ?V. University

IN ASSETS
IN INCOME
IN GAIN OF EACH

IN BUSINESS PLACED
IN BUSINESS GAINED
IN BUSINESS IN FORCE

IN ORDINARY BUSINESS IN FC
IN REDUCTION OF MORTALIT
IN HEALTH AND WELFARE Wt

I

"THE COMPANY OF THE PEOPLE, BY THE PEOPLE, FOR THE PEOPLE." - JOHN R.

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