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April 20, 1922 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-04-20

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN THURSDAY, APRIL 20, 1922

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LEY

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ON

Neces-I

a,,April 19.-The German dele-
nd experts have not yet been
find a formula whereby to com-
with the Entette powers
sacrificing the Russo-German
although they were in session
ry late hour tonight.
Demand Complete Policy
is are being made to have the
nee formulate a Russian policy
ch the Russo-German . treatyf
absorbed, thus giving it the1
of conference approval and re-1
the cause of hard feeling.
plain language of PremierR
1eorge to the German statement
ver the treaty incident, which
time threatened to disrupt the
ic conference, was believed to
leared the poltical atmosphere,
neithex the German reply to the
nor the Russian reply regard-
ceptance of the co.mmissions
restoration of Russia was
ming, the situation is still con-
critical.
Germans Embarrassed
of the neutrals described the
is as embar.rassed as how to
way out of the difficulty. Mean-
he work of the conference is
d. The neutral states have of-
insisted that the agenda. of
nference be discissed in thel
scions and not in private con-
on among the chief delegates.
3 the leaders rejoin that prelim-
neetings are advisable in order
edite the labor of the confer-
nley, Wier
Write In Etude
ne of a series of retrospective
s by well known musicians of
untry, an article by Dr. A. A.
y, who directed the School of
up until his resignation last
appears this month in "The
the monthly music journal put
the Theodore Presser com-
Stanley's article tells briefly of
rpose of his work here at Mich-
nd the aim of his life in music-
-k: The article is accompanied
icture of Dr. Stanley at the age
and a recent one, a period lf
rs elapsed between the taking of

EN CK TO GIE RECITIL
Detroit Organist Plays Today in the
Twilight Program
L. L. Renwick, concert organist and
former head of the organ department
of the School of Music, will give the
weekly recital at 4:15 o'clock this
afternoon in Hill auditorium.
Mr. Renwick is now engaged in or-
gan work in Detroit, where he has
been teaching organ and doing concert
work. This artist was in Ann Arbor
a few weeks ago on the Twilight se-
ries and his work is well known to
Ann Arbor concert patrons.
The complete program will,b e as
follows:"
Choral,' "A Mighty Fortress Is
Our God;" Fughetta, "These
Are the Ten Holy Command-
ments"..................Bach
Pastorale (The Infant Jesus) ....Yon
Symphony, No. 4 (Three Move-
ments) ... ... . . Widor
Toccata - Andante Cantabile -
Finale
Eurydice..................Chaffin
Morning Song.............Renwick
Festival March . Faulkes
STUDENT COUNCIL
*PCKS NOMINES
Election Plans Outlined in Session
Last Night; Set Tuesday for
Registration
HILLERY, '23, ROSS, '23E,
CANDIDATES FOR PRESIDENT
Election plans were carefully out-
lined at the regular meeting of the
Student council held last night in the
Union. The action taken by the elec-
tion committee in appointing Tuesday
as registration day was approved and
all councilmen were asked to be pres-
ent to count the ballots on election
night, May 2. _
Two candidates, Vernon F.Hillery,
'23, and John W. Ross, '23E, were
nominated from the juniors in the
council, to be voted on for president
of the Studelt council in the coming
All-campus elections. Two candi-
dates, one from the junior and one
from the sophomore classes, were
nominated to be voted on for the two
positions as councilmen at large. The
men chosen were Robert 0. Martin,
'23, and Robert C. Moriarty, '24.'
No action was taken on the Spring
games hich will be held May 12 and
13, owing to the pressure of elections
on all the councilmen. No definite
date was set for "cane" day as all the
senior canes have not yet arrived.
IAction will be taken on this matter
as soon as everyone is suplied.
Permission was given the commit-
tee working on the Kids' Summer
camp to hold a tag day on the cam
Spus and Tuesday and Wednesday- of
next week were set aside for this
purpose
The council also expressed its ap-
proval of the work the Michigan
News bureau is doing for the Univer-
sity and pledged its support. to any
r work the bureau may undertake in the
future.

PARTY LEADERSHIP BROKEN
SUPPORT OF 86,000
PERSONNEL

PRESIDENT SCORES
VICTORY IN ROUSE
ON* B16 NAVY, BILL.

IN

NO ENTHUSIASM GREETS
SHIFT I N FINAL V O T E
Measure Pasded with Large Appro-
liriatlon After Settlement of
Disputed Point
(By Associated Press)
Washington, April 19. - By a mar-
gin of 71 votes the house tonight
broke away from its own leadership,
stood behind the President and pass-1
ed the 1923 navy appropriation bill
with an amendment fixing the enlisted
personnel at 86,000.
Parties Split
The vote on the McArthur-Vare
amendment, the big point in dispute,
increased the main force from 67,000
as provided in the bill, was 221 to
148, with two members answering
present. Ninety Republicans voted
against the 86,000 amendment, while
48 Democrats supported it.
There was no great shout at the'
finish like that which filled thecham-
ber a week ago when the same pro-
posal was put through the house,
sitting in committee of the whole, by
a margin of 47 votes. A bare hand
clap, or two greeted the announcement
by the speaker. The galleries, half
deserted, made no attempt at a dem-
onstration.
Passed in Fnal Form
With the fighting section out bf the
way the bill was put on its passage
and went through 279 to 78. As amend-
ed, the measure carried a total of
$251,259,000, or $18,000,000 more than
the total fixed by the appropriations
committee which sent it.a
ST, LAWRENCE CANAL
xPROJECT BENEFICIAL

Selected Readings Are to Be Given bys
Noted American Writer'
Louis Untermeyer, poet and criticE
of contemporary literature, will give
a talk on modern American poets atl
8 o'clock. tonight in Hill auditorium.-
This lecture is the third number of a
series of talks by American poets1
given under, the auspices of Whim-
sies and the Ann Arbor branch of the
Association of University Women, for
the benefit of the Michigan League
campaign fund.:
Untermeyer will give a number of4
Varied Work 0y 1
Local Artists
On ',Lxhition
Sketches, pain'tings, and bits of
sculpture by local artists, most of
whom are connected with the Univer-
sity, are being displayed in the lec-
ture room of Alumni Memorial hall
by the Ann Arbor Art association.j
Ppof. Emil Lorch, of the college of
architecture, heads the list of faculty
contributors with a group of sketch-
es entitled "Scenes at Whitmore
Lake."
Alumni Memorial hall, University
hall, the Union, and the Engineering
arch are the subjects of four sketches
by Wilfred Shaw, '04, secretary of the
Alumni association. Mr. Shaw also
contributed a large number of other
sketches and paintings.
Prof. H. R. Cross, of the fine arts de-
partment, has a number of paintings
of various countries called "Leaves
from Sketch Books." Leon A. Makiel-
ski and E. H. Barnes, instructors in
architectural drawing, contributed and
Prof. E. M. Davis, of the botany de-
partment,. exhibits a group of paint-
ings of the River Nile.,a
Other artists, residents of Ann Ar-
bor and members of the Ann Arbor
Art association, whose work is dis-
played are: Mrs. W. P. Lombard,
Warren P. Lombard, C. W. Edmunds,
Mrs. Everett Somerville Brown, and
Samuel Adolph Crashwan, who con-
tributed three bits of sculpture, the
only ones on display.
This collection of work is being dis-
played to students and others interest-
ed in the lecture room of Alumni hall'
between 1 and 5 o'clock. An admissiony
fee of 25 cents will be charged.
PROF, CESTRE SPEAKS
FNEXT WEEK ON FRANCE

UNTERMEYER, POET AND CIT, SPEAKS TONIGNT

readings from his own poems, which
show an unusual technical mastery
of metre that is well adapted to his
material. He manages the subtle ca-
dences of free verse, the rhythmic
sweep of the sonnet, and the varied
lyric lines with equal facility. It is
this combination of direct, authentic
inspiration and skillful craftsmanship
that gives him his high place among
contemporary poets.
Representative poems from the
works of other American poets will
be given as well as those from Unter-
meyer's own writings. It is an inter-
esting fact that some poems by Mrs.
Untermeyer, who has also - written
magazine verse, will be included in
the readings.
As a critic Untermeyer is well
known for his parodies which he has
\written on many of the new Ameri-
can poems. Although he has as keen
sense of humor he tempers it with a
sympathetic understanding of life and
never allows his criticisms to ap-
proach a bitter atmosphere.
OLD OCUMENTSI
Well Known Bibliographer Discussesl
Early American Colonization
in Talk
ADDRESS TO STUDENTS OF
HISTORY PLANNED TODAY

Thousands of Alumni '
on Varsity -Mass
April29
Michig'an alumni th
country are eagerly res
appeal for celebration
Night on Saturday, Al
letters have been rece
Fielding H. Yost, chai
program which will I
throughout the nation
News Radio Broadcasti
pressing indorsement 01

DENVER--LO
SRELAY NO

~MICN1
TOCE
WE STERN
TO

SADLER SAYS GREAT LAKES TO
SEA WATERWAY WOULD AID
ENTIRE COUNTRY
"That the proposed St. .Lawrence
waterwa from the Great Lakes to the
Atlantic will benefit the eastern coast
towns 4s- well as the interior ports
is a fact being overlooked,' de-
clared Prof. Herbert C. Sadler, of the
naval architecture and marine engi-
neering department, recently.
He. pointed out that although the
plan was in some aspects competitive
with the suggested Mississippi water-
way, the association pushing the latter
scheme was also promoting the "Great
Lakes to the sea" plan.
He further indicated that the coast
towns probably would not suffer from
loss of traffle to the extent that they
imagine, because much of the goods
to be shipped to Europe may have to
be reloaded from Great Lakes' vessels
to the trans-Atlantic type of sea-go-
ing 'ship. Professor Sadler said that
the opposition of the New York state
element was due to its loss in canal
traffic and in the income that its ports
derive from European shipments.
In general, he declared, the whole
country will be greatly benefited by
the successful completion of the wa-
terway.
POOL DRIVE TOTAL
MAY REACH $6,000

"I believe that the famous Capt.
John Smith map of Virginia, which,
hitherto was suposed to be the work
of the man after whom it is named,
is the work of Capt. Nathaniel Pow-
ell, an early adventurer," aid Worth-
ington C. Ford, author, editor, econom-
ist, bibliographer, librarian, and au-
thority on American history, in his
lecture delivered yesterday afternoon
in Natural Science auditorium.
During his lecture Mr. Ford out-.1
lined by means of a few map slides
the Spanish visits and occupations to
Virginia, the efforts made to establish'
the Spanish mission, and the later at-
tempts by the English to colonize the
state.
It was through the advice of Mr.
Ford, principally, according to Prof.
C. H. Van Tyne, that the largest col-
lection of history documents for the
new Clements library was made. He
now holds the position of expert ad-
viser to the John Carter Brown It-
brarYr at Providence, R. I., the only
American historical Ibrary ranking
with the Clements library.
;Mr. Ford will address students in
the history department at 4:15 o'clock
this afternoon in room 224, Natural
Science building, on the subject,
"Some ;Presideul Papers."'
PROPOSE INSPECTION OF
STUDET EAING OUSE

Enthusiasm reached its
-pitch in Los Angeles, believed
beyond the range of the set I
of the interference of the
Mountains. Judge Spill, an e
astic alumnus of Pasadena, he
posed the idea of relaying tb
gram from Denver or some oth
and is laying plans for a huge
gahering in Los Angeles, if -th
proposition is deemed feasible.
Numerous cities have fallen
with the Michigan 'Night idea,
is a distinct innovation for an
meeting. By the radio thousa
alumni will in reality attend'a
igan mass meeting, which will
ceed any previous attempt by
versity or college to bring its
in contact with the student bc
alumni speakers.
Meeting Held Through W
Kahnsas City, Cincinnati, St.
Indianapolis, Battle Creek,
Los Angeles, Nashville, Tenn
cago, Fort Wayne, Cleveland,
and Bay City are among the
that plan to hold meetigs 0:
29. More are expected to be
from. Halls are being enga
the evening, and elaborate re
sets installed.
Although the program is bei
in Detroit, the alumni eveif tb
getting together in the hotel
After the program has been s<
all the speakers and the Varsi
club will adjourn to the Statler
there will be further-entertain
Yost Has Uni
Little Thee
Ypsilanti claims a unique
Theater, one of the smallest a
est in the country. It is a -ren
I barn, its 12 by 18 auditorium
only 60 persons, its balcony, a
haymow, and its stage equilip
a $2,000 lighting system. It is
ed by theatrical experts to be
passed within its limits by at
in larger theaters.
The interior of the theater i
ed and decorated with old
lanterns, giving it an Flizabet
pearance. One-act plays are
and presented under the' dire
Daniel L. Quirk, a'Michigan gi
JOE'S, NEW C AF
OPENED TUES
Joe Parker served his first
in his new cafe, in the base
the Cornwell building, on! the
of Fourth and East Huron
Tuesday night.
The old carved table tops t
merly decorated the Catalpa i
fastened to all the walls. J
that he will specialize in ste
chops as formerly, and that Ur
students will be catered-to.

IDEALS OF NATIVE LAND TO
DISCUSSED IN FOUR
TALKS

BE[

Prof. Charles Cestre, recently ap-
pointed to the newly created chair in
American literature and civilization,
in the University of Paris, will give
a series of four public lectures, be-
ginning April 25, at 4:15 o'clock each
afternoon in Natural Science auditor-

arion C. Wier, of the rhetoricl
nt and teacher of the 'celloin
1 of Music, also has an article
pril Etude. He stresses the,
older violins may have grept-
than new ones but says the
been much over-emphasized,
s that in the matter of 'cellos
n true that the older instru-
ar inferior to the newer.
P MANAGER OF A. P.
(0 SPEAK TO PRESS CLUB
Wilkie, manager of the De-
nch of the Associated Press,
k at the Press club dinner
d next Tuesday night in the
Mr. Wilkie will explain the,
of the news association as
es in Detroit.
fohnson of the Grand Rapids
III ppeal at the following
of the Press cluil.
- I
CLASS MEETINGS
ing of the sophomore lit
to make nominations for
ming campus elections will
ld at 4 o'clock, Frfday, I
21, in room 205, Mason I
H. Q. KIPKE,
President. 1
or lit meeting at 4 o'clock
in Newberry hall. Nomi. I
for councilmen from the I
class will be made at ths I
g. Other important busi- I
till be-transacted. I

ENSIN COVERS ARRIVE
Samples of Design for '22 Year Book
Sent to Local Ofice
Sample covers for the 1922 Michi-
ganensian arrived at the 'Ensian of-'
fice yesterday afternoon. They are
brown with the seal of the University
in gold in the upper center. "These
covers are Unusual in design and we
are going to keep them as a surprise,"
said itobert F. Wieneke, '22, business
manager. The material in the covers
is "Kowide."
"The annual ,has gone to the print-
ers and as a result we expect the ear-
liest publication in years," stated
James G. Frey, '22, editor of the 'sn-
sian. There sre to be 2,500 copies.
published, exactly the number requir-
ed to fill the orders, The boob should
be ready for distribution about May 1.5.
DECIDE TO DEFER
ACOUSTIC CHANGE

Investigations of the acoustics of
Hill auditorium, after the complaints
that had been made regarding the dif..
fusion of sounds when the house was
not full, has shown that the present
-acoustics are the best possible and
are only slightly affected when the.
balconies are empty,
It was found that the empty seats
do reflect the sounds and break up
the acuostics somewhat but the ex-
pense of putting in new felt-covered
seats is too great to be attempted at
the present time. These seats would
absorb the sound instead of reflecting'
it and this plan may be adopted in

Additional reports from solicitors
who worked during spring' vacationj
for funds to complete the Union swim-"
ming pool yesterday boosted the total
$900 over the day previous, making
the grand total last night $3,100. Stu-
dents are continuing to make their re-
ports upon returning to Ann Arbor.
- The Milwaukee Alumni association
has signified its intention' of sending
a check for $1,000 by May 1. The Chi-
cago association expects to give $300
out of its own treasury, and at least
$500 has been collegcted from individ-
uals in Chicago which has not yet been
reported. The Athletic association
here has given $1,000.
All of the $3,100 which was actually
collected was in the form of small do-
nations. This amount, together with
the pledges that have been made, is
expected to bring the total for the
drive up to $6,000.
Students that have-not as yet turned
in their reports are urged tc do so at
once.
Whimsies Out Tomorrow .
Whimsies for April, which was to
have been placed on sale today, will
not make its appearance until tomor-
row, due to a delay in printing.

ium. I
The general subject of Professor
Cestre's lectures will be "The Ideals
of France." The subjects of the in-
dividual lectures have been announc-
ed as follows: April 25, "The Ideal of
Reason;" April 26, "The Ideal of
Progress;" April 27, "The Ideal of
Equality and Solidarity;" and April
28, "France and Peace."
During his stay in this city Profes-
sor Cestre will also address the
Graduate club - on "Walt Whitman,i
Poet of the Self,v and will speak be-
fore the faculty and students of the
department of romance languages, in
French, on the subject, "'La Scholas-
tique Jugee par -Rabelais .et par Mo-
liere."'
Professor Cestre was one of the
first French students to come to Har-
yard, some 20 years ago, on the then
newly established Hyde foundation.
He has made a study of American life
and literature. In addition to his
present position he has also been pro-
fessor of English literature at the
.University of Bordeaux. .
A former appearance of Professor
Cestre in Ann Arbor four years ago,
has caused many here to remember
him as a man with great personality
and a command of the English lan-
guage.

SECURE MUSIC FO FROLICI
Waring's and Kennedy's Orchestras
to Play at Fresh Dance .
Waring's and kennedy's orchestras
have been secured for the Freshman
frolic that will be given May 12 in
the Union ball room. The Waring
orchestra of Pittsburgh,. Penn., play-
ed- here for the' J-Hop and the Soph
Prom.
One hundred fifty applications haver
been received to dateand as only 200,
will be given out all applications'
must be in soon. The tickets, costing
$5 apiece, will go on sale soon in the
Union. Class dues must be paid be-
fore tickets can be purchased.
The affair will be formal and no
stags will be admitted. .

PORTIA SOCIETY TO HOLD
INSTALLATION APE
New Women's Literary Organic
Will Have Banquet at'
Union
Plans have been completed f
installation banquet of the Porti
erary society, which will be
Thursday, April 27, at the
Blanche V. Kynast, '24, presid
the new society, will be toastmi
and speeches will be given by
Ray K. Immel, of the oratory d
meitt, and Mary Hobson, '23, pre
of the Athen-a Literary society.
The alms- of the society are
tially the same as those of the 2
society, of which it is an outg
to give the women-of the Uni-

The inspection of eating houses, and
the issue of certificates of approval to
those whose sanitary conditions are
commendable will be one of the new
activtiies of the Students' Physical
Welfagr department, according to Dr.
John Sundwall, director..
"We hope to establish health of-
ficers, one in each public eating house,:
fraternity house, and so forth, and
have these'officers co-operate with us
in onr fight for sanitation," explained
Dr. W. E. Forsythe, of the Health
service. He declared, that sanitary
conditions in Ann Arbor eating houses
were no worse than those at most
other universities, but explaied that
there' was in general need for super-
vision.-

Band Concert Postponed
Arrangements for the University of
Michigan band concert which was
scheduled to be held Friday evening
in Hill auditorium, have been cancell-
ed. This action was necessary due to
the absence of Capt. Wilfred Wilson,
director of the band, from the city
during the latter part of the week.
The corrcert will be, held -in the near
future.

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