100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 09, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-10-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

______THE MICHIGAN DAILY?

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
sity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
reited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at therpostoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
class matter.
Surscription by carrier or mail, 3.o.a d
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
t" faith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
uscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
TheDaily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
pressed in the communications.
"What's Going On notices will not be received after 6 o'clock
on the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR .......... BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
Assistant Managing Editor...............ufh W. Hitchcock
City Editor.............................. E. P. Lovejoy, Jr.
Night Editors-
M. B. Stahl G. P. Overton
R. E. Adams Hughston McBain
Paul Watzel Edward Lambrecht
F. H. MPike
Editorials..T. J. Whinery L. A. ern, S. T. Beach, E. R. Meiss
Supplement Editors.................T. S. Sargent, T. H. Adams
Sporting Editor ................................ George Reindel
Women's Editor.............................Elizabeth Vickery
Humor Editor....................................E R. Meiss
Assistants
Harry B. Grundy John Dawson Ben H. Lee, Jr.
Wallace F. Elliott idney B. Coates Julian Mack
M. A. Klaver Lowell S. Kerr Howard Donahue
Drothy Whipple H. E. Howlett Arnold Fleig
Marion Koch Katherine Montgomery
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER ............. VERNON F. HILLERY
Advertising ........................F. M. Heath, A. J. Parker
Publication.............................. Nathan W. Robertson
Accounts..... ..........................John J. Hamels Jr.
Circu~lation ..........................Herold C. Hunt
Assistants
H. Willis Heidbreder Tyler Stevens
Walter K. Scherer Martin Goldring
W. Cooley L. -B Parks
Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for
any issue of The Daily should see the nightceditor, who has full
charge of all news to be printed that night.
- SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1921
Night Editor-PAUL WATZEL
HEREDITY AND ATTAINMENT
That heredity predetermines one's chances of suc-
cess in life, setting a limit upon attainment which it
is hopeless to try to exceed, is one of the many
baneful beliefs current amog the partially in-
formed. Modern scientific doctrines are thought
to support this depressing belief, and as a result
individual initiative often is arrested, and many
persons are influenced to yield to discouragement.
It will be well, therefore, to dispel any vagueness or
unnecessary apprehension which may exist.
Certain fundamental laws of heredity, based upon
the cellular doctrine of life-transmission, are unde-
niable; yet no person should misapprehend the
probable effect of those laws upon himself He us-
ually knows to little of those factors in his gen-
ealogy which have transmitted his inherited consti-
tution, to more than broadly interpret his past, and
from that to gauge his future. Scientific knowl-
edge at the present stage is admittedly too meager
to warrant definite forecast of an individual's at-
tainment, except in extraordinary or abnormal
cases . The iaxibrnun capacity, while admitted to
exist, cannot be predetermined. Authorities state
that only when one has died can his maximum ca-
pacity be definitely known. Until then the zone of
possibility will remain as it has always been, an
open field for the play of the imagination, for hope,
ambition, and zestful trial of ability.
Of course there are certain generalizations about
heredity and attainment which every thoughtful
person knows Those indifferent to progress will
never attain much, though they may have inherited
an abundance of talent; and those however gifted
who may attempt the impossible or unreasonable,
are doomed to disappointment.
Anyone desiring to calculate his prospects of suc-

cess, even if he is equipped with a knowledge of
heredity, should follow the time-tested practice of
consulting his past attainments and his present fit-
ness, and then make a try for the realization of
that ambition or desire which he regards as reason-
able. Only the outcome - provided he does his
conscientious best - can demonstrate his capacity.
Nothing else can.
YOST-ISMS
Some days ago, Coach Fielding H. Yost, in an ad-
dress before the members of the freshman engineer-
ing class, gave out a group of maxims whose ob-
servance need by no means be limited to those who
were present to hear the gridiron mentor's words.
Coming as they do from a man's man who has
himself gone through varied experiences, who has
spent his life making football elevens famous, and
who has more than once brought victory to Michi-
gan through his dynamic influence, these bits of
epigramatic advice, first given to football men about
to enter the scrimmage and but recently given to
the yearling engineers, should be of importance to
every one who wishes to get somewhere in college
or after life.
Says Coach Yost, "You can't win on what you did
last Saturday," - a truth applicable alike to the
football player, the student in college, and the suc-
cessful graduate. Past accomplishments may build
up an enviable reputation but life's battle is not won
with one blow; it is a campaign against successive
obstacles. The man who thinks he will ride along
on what he has done in the past is bound to be out-

distanced in anything heeundertakes.
"Do your part. The plays are planned for eleven
men, not ten," another of Yost's maxims, points out
the student's duty in taking part in campus affairs
as well as the athlete's obligation to his school and
team-mates. In the aggregate little things like at-
tending class meetings, giving support in athletic
contests, and intelligent voting and thinking in re-
gard to campus affairs, become as important to
Michigan's welfare as the crucial moments in a
football game, and it is essential that every man
should be in every play.
"Leaving it to George, gives George the credit,"
"If the game is going against you, keep your head
up, set your jaw, go to it," and "It's not what you
get but what you give," contain in a few words the
meat of the fighting philosophy that has made Mich-
igan great on and off the gridiron. In spite of the
prevalent discount on "proverbial wisdom," who-
ever makes Coach Yost's epigrams a part of him-
self can't help but end near the top and also be a
benefit to his college before graduation and his
community afterwards.
DOING AWAY WITH SPOILS
Reports from Washington indicate that civil
service investigations for first class postmaster po-
sitions in the state of Michigan will be conducted
more thoroughly this year than they have been in
the past, and that true merit will be the basis upon
which the appointments will be made. Past and
present character, standin in the community, pop-
ularity, business ability, and alertness in the case
of each individual will be probed to the quick. This
is a step in the right direction when one reflects
upon the easiness kith which some people have
acceded to these positions in the past.
Previous to 1883, when the civil service commis-
sion was established, the merit system was not used
as a means of filling positions and by malicious use
of the principle, "to the victor belongs the spoils,"
the system became honeycombed with inefficiency
and corruption. In 1883 a commission of three
men was established and the merit system was ap-
plied to certain positions. Since that time its scope
has been greatly extended. But the position of post-
master has always been an appointive one, and it
has been too easy for a congressman to name a po-
litical ward heeler to fill it. By the present plan of
administering a special investigation this condition
will be alleviated.
While a written examination will not be given,
it is said that visiting officials will not be interested
in the men that are endorsed from a political
source unless good reasons can be given for nam-
ing them. A detailed questionnaire has been pre-
pared for each applicant to answer. Visiting offi-
cials will interview the active heads of banks,
newspapers, and factories in the home town of the
would-be postmaster. When this information is
obtained on a large scale it will be sent to Wash-
ington and the applicant will be rated accordingly.
This type of investigation is more thorough than
has been the case and such delving into the history
of the prospective candidates should insure good
postmasters. Though the civil service has been
progressing rapidly in efficiency for the past thirty
years it has not reached a point where the political
grabsters cannot find positions to their liking within
its portals.
The telescope

A complete line of textbooks and supplies

for all colleges at both stores

GRAHAM
B5at h ends of the diagonal ]Palk

I _ '

:EMOITUNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jacksonr
TIMIE TABLE3
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Excpress Cars-6.05 a.
Im., 7:05 a. mn., 8 :oa. In. andlhosly to o
p. In.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
Arbor), 9:48 a. In. and every two hours to
I:48 P p.
Local Cars East Bound-s :55 a.m, 7 .:oo a.
In. and every two hours, to 9 :oo p. In., ii :oo
. To i.10Ypsilanti only--xt : o p. in., 2.25
a. s M., :.a. n.
T1o Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local' Cars West Bound-7 :50 a. 111., a2:40 p.
in.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-- 1iite cars:
S:48, 10 :.+i a. im, i2 :48, 2:, ,4
To Jackson and Lansing-iiited: 8 49

USE! CA4RYS
Can now be bought at exceptionally low prices.
This condition will not last long. We urge used-
car buyers to take advantage of our stock of cars
and motor cycles while the market is down.
SEELEY - LUMBY CO.
COR. DETROIT AND CATHERINE STS.
General Garage Service-Phone 2902-11 We cater to Student trade

1921

OCTOBER

2
9
16
23
30

3
10
17
2-1
31

4
11
18
25

5
12
19
26

6
13
20
27

7.
14
21
- 28

121
15
e
29

NOTICE TO MEN
We do all kinds of high-class Hat
work at pre--var prices. RMts turned
inside out, with all new triiniings,
are as good as new.
FACTORY HAT STORE
(U7 LPACKARD STRIT
Telephone 1792
Advanced
SECRETARIAL TRAINING
for Stenographers
MON. & THURS. EVENINGS
Hamilton Business College

(Y r n rrr r r+rrn 3

999

T'AXI

999

I

A Dodge Car
and Dodge
Service-
enough said

999

TAXI

999

r
... F-Y. ef".C. i+

Trap

Drummers

Attention!!

WHERE ARE YOU GOING TO BE SU P P I ED WITH
YOUR DRUMS, TRAPS, AND HAVE YOUR REPAIR
WORK DONE?

4

GENUINE LEEDY & LUDWIG ALL-METAL SNARE DF
MAHOGANY OR MAPLE SHELL
BASS DRUMS BASS DRUM BEATERS WOOD BL(
TRAPS CASES, ETC., ETC.
DEAGAN XYLOPHONES DINNER CHIMES
GENUINE ZILDJIAN & CIE TURKISH' CYMBALS
GENUINE CHINESE CRASH CYMBALS

RUMS
OCKS

Quick and efficient service on re-heading all size Drums and Banjos. We supply the very best
brun an-d banjo heads.
How about our prices? Professional prices prevail here. Give us an opportunity to figure with
you on your supplies and repairs-you'll be money ahead.
Schaeberie & Son Music House

I
I:

Coining Through U. Hal
(Dedicated to the N. and S. Entrances)
If a body meet a body
Comin' through the door,
If a body bumf a body,
Need a body swore?
met a body, comin' out the "in" door of U. Hall.
met the body once again; I heard the body call:
"If you go in the one marked 'in',
You're wrong, you careless lout;
You should go out the one marked 'in',
And in the one marked 'out'."
- Amitus.

I10 SOUTH

MAIN STREET

WHITE FRONT

Maybe the frosh who wears his goiluf costume
to his classes thinks that going to college is a kind
of sport.
Quoth Eppie Taff:
He aimed at the moon
And hit a star.
But the orb fell down
On Silas Carr.
The key to the Campus Chimes is hereby ten-
dered to the '25 man who thinks that Waterman
gym is the Varsity swimming pool.
And Still They Come!
Dear Erm:
There's Erma
And also Erman;
Have you heard of me?
I'm Herman.
Our Latest Song Entitled:
"Even the brightest fish may be taken in seine."
If the post office were on fire,
Would you stand and flinch and quail,
Or would you grab a fire hose,
And rush to flood the mail?
Famous Closing Lines
"Out of date," sighed the poor, lonely co-ed as
her social calendar showed blank after blank.
ERM.

"When You Bu, Buy Quality"
, -
a1

An Unusual Oppor-

tunit

two of the finest clothing lines in the

roUnry--

HICKEY-FREEMAN
HIRSH, WICKWIRE

and the pick of styles and fabrics

specially for Young Men.
40-65

WAGNER

& COMPANY
Since 1848
T AT LIBERTY

For Men
STATE

STREET

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan