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October 09, 1921 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-10-09

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/'

THE WEATHER
PROBABLY LIGHT RAIN-
SLIGHTLY WARMER

LL

E.ddLirdi&wn

~1Iaito

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
D)AY VAND NIGHT WIR)
SERV1IE

VOL. XXXII. No. 13. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1921 PRICE FIVE CEN'

i

GOVERNMENT TAKS
STEPS TO PREVENT
SHORHTAGE O-F COAL
HARDING, HOOVER. AND DAVIS
CONFER WITH UNION
OFFICIALS
NO DEFINITE DECISION
GIVEN OUT AT MEETING
Immediate Attempts to Arbitrate Wage
Scale Agreement Prove of
No Avall
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Oct. 8. - The govern-
ment intervened today to prevent any
possible stoppage of coal production
next March when the bituminous mm-
ers' wage scale agreement expires,
but its efforts after a four hour con-
ference at the White House between
President Harding and Secretaries
Hoover and Davis and union officials
were said to have been without im-
mediate avail.
The conference was held when the
central committee of the United
Mine Workers of America, headed by
John L. Lewis, president of the or-
ganization, came here at the request
of President Harding to discuss with
the administration the possibility of
undertaking to arbitrate any ultimate
differences with the operators prior
to the expiration of the national
agreement in March. The committee
was received at the White House at
noon, being the guests of the Presi-
dent at luncheon and continuing the
discussion late in the day.
At the conclusion of the r",nference
Mr. Hoover issued a statement, say-
ing that "owing to the situation of thef
miners' leaders as tlb result of the
decision of the Indianapolis conven-
tion to defer discussion of the new
agreement until after their February
meeting, it has been impossible to
come to any immediate arrangement."

MASQUES TO HOLD
AUTUMN TRYOUTS
Masques, women's dramatic organ-
ization, will open its years' work with
tryouts to be held from 3 to 5 o'clock
Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday aft-
ernoons in Sarah Caswell Angell hall.
Because of the large number of appli-
cants, freshmen will be beard on Mon-
day and all other women on Tuesdayj
and Wednesday. Each candidate will,
be asked to read or recite something
of her own choice.
Membership is limited to 50 in order
to allow each member to take an ac-
tive part, but tryouts are open to all
University women who are interested
in play production and play reading.
Practical training in every phase of
stage work is given throughout the
year.
The activities of the club will be
under the direction of Prof. J. Raleigh
Nelson who has held this office for
five years.
MONDAY SEES OPENING
BASKETBALLPRATC
ALL IN READINESS FOR INITIAL
GATHERING OF COURT
PLAYERS
With Monday evening set as the
opening night for basketball practice,
Coach E. J. Mather is getting all in
readiness to greet his court candi-
dates. In order to facilitate the distri-
bution of equipment, all men who areE
going out for Varsity basketball are
urged to report between 9 and 12,
o'clock Monday morning at the athletic
office in the Press building for the as-
signment of lockers and equipment.
Practice will commence that evening
at 7 o'clock.
The coach and Captain Rea are an-
ticipating a large turnout for the court
squad. Fundamentals and calisthenics
will occupy the early weeks of prac-
tice, as Mather is a stickler on condi-
tion and complete knowledge of the
basic points of the game. For a short
while, at least, the coach will call out
his men only two nights a week. Later
on the practice sessions will be night-
ly.
As the first game will not take place
until after Christmas intensive drill
will be postponed for some time. z

PLAN BAND TRIPS
STO BIG TEN GAMES

OFFICIALS STRESS
OHIO TICKET RULE

Entertainment Being

Arranged toI

Raise Funds Necessary
for Journeys

.USICIANS MIGAT PRESENT
. SEASON CONCERT IN CHICAGO
Plans are progressing rapidly for
the annual Band Bounce which will
take place in the near future in Hill
auditorium. The band will take the
Wisconsin trip and, if possible, the
Illinois trip as well. According to S.
R. Bidwell, '24L, manager of the
band, at least $3,500 will be needed for
each trip. The purpose of the Band
Bounce is to raise part of this
amount.
Several other ideas have been ad-
vanced for securing the money. One
is to have the Varsity band present
a concert in Chicago under the au-
spices of the Chicago alumni. Fur-
thermore, the committee in charge
hopes to obtain permission from the
athletic committee to pass buckets at
the Ohio State game into which it is
hoped that all loyal Michiganites will
contribute freely in order that the
band may make these trips.
The regular bandmen are to be
picked and the uniforms given out the
first of next week. The band this
year will consist of more than 65
pieces. At the next meeting of the
band rewards for service will be giv-
en those who have played for one
year or more. Those playing one year
will receive a silver insignia, while
those serving more than two years, a
gold one.
CLASSES MEET FRI
TO CHOOSE OFFICERS

STUDENT COUNCIL COMMITTEE
CHARGE OF FALL BALLOT-
ING NAMED

IN

Dauntless Spirit And High Ideals
Lxplain Success Of Frost 's Career,

(By Delbert Clark)
A man of the people, intensely hu-
man, intensely absorbing personally,'
scholarly without ostentation, whose
accurate sense of values will not al-
low success to spoil him - that is
Robert Frost He is not a large man
physically, but of medium stature, not
at all prepossessing in appearance,
but with a face from which shine in
abundance good nature and bewitch-
ing lenity 'of spirit But as he talks,
in his quiet, flowing voice, the lis-
tener loses view of his stature, his
physical characteristics, and sees only
his greatness of soul, his steadfastness
of purpose. which rise above insur-
mountable obstacles without antagon-
ism or bitterness.
Never Lost Hope
Twenty years of persistent effort in
one field without recognized success
would be sufficient to dampen the
spirit of a smaller man, but not so
with Frost. And at the end of the
period of trial, when success, almost
unanticipated, finally crowned his ef-
forts, the great soul of the man was
unspoiled.
"For 20 years," says Robert Frost,
with whimsical humor, "the supply of
my writings was far in excess of the
demand I had much to sell, but it
was not wanted then. Now I do not
keep up with the demand. And the
demand does not come solely from
those whc pay well. There are the
small, private publications, who pay
nothing, but who may be denied only
on pain of mortal displeasure. Then
there are the weekly magazines of
large circulation, who pay little, but
i4 whose case a refusal means an un-
favorable review of one's next work.
All get promises, but their fulfillment
is more difficult of achievement."
Mr Frost, unlike many of the mod-
erns, is not a commercialized writer.
He does not write a book a year, like
some of the popular novelists, but, in
his own words, "I am a very erratic
writer. I do not write a -poem a

day, and I have no definite time in
which I do write. Some of my things
have been written in the morning,
and some in the middle of the night.
I never write in the afternoon. My
time then is always free. Sometimes
I do not write a thing for six months,
and sometimes I write steadily for six
months. It all depends upon the mood
which possesses me. I do not write
mechanically."
Mr. Frost remarks that he has al-
ways been just a little sorry that his
first volume of verse was not publish-
ed in America, but in a foreign coun-
try, England. After achieving little
material success in this country, Mr.
Frost went to England to reside for a
few years, without plans for getting
his works published. "But one day,"
he said, "following my custom, I was
seated before the fire, reading over a
number of my past efforts. My habit
was to get out my writings at various
intervals, and sit before the fire and
read, them, saving some, consigning
others to the flames. On this partic-
ualr occasion there flashed before my
mind a visualization of some 30 of
them as a group, and I conceived the
idea of combining them in one vol-
ume. Next day I stuffed them in my
pocket and went out in search of a
publisher. The idea of publishing a
whole volume had not occurred to me
before, but the first publisher to
whom I showed the verses acceptedl
them. With that as a starter there
came a measure of recognition.
Americans Madly Idealistic
"The idea that Americans are too
materialistic seems to me to be ri-
diculous," remarked Mr. Frost, in the
course of the conversation. "I am
rather of the firm belief that they are
almost madly idealistic. No other
people in the world is so ready and
enthusiastic in its recognition of lit-
erature than the American. In fact, in
the old country, if the son of a family
announced his decision to follow some
(Continued on Page Ten)

Class elections will be carried on
this year by a simpler system than has
been the custom in the past. A coin-
mittee has been appointed by the Stu-
dent council consisting of W. W. Gow-
er, '22, chairman; Edward F. Moore,
'22E; William M. Brown, '22D; and
Ralph 0. Rychener, '22M.
According to the plans that have
been made the elections of all class
officers, fwith the exception of the
freshman lits, will be held on next
Firday, Oct. 14. In order that the mem-
bers of each class may know whom 1
they are to vote on, all nominations
for class officers must be completedI
by Thursday. Arrangements have
been made for the senior lits to nom-
inate on Tuesday, the junior lits on
Wednesday, and the sophomore lits on
Thursday. All these nominations will
be made in University Hall at 4 o'clock
on the days named. In all the other
colleges of the University, nominations
will be made at special class meetings.
The freshman lit class will nominate
its officers after the "Talks to Fresh-
men" meeting a week from tomorrow
and its elections will be made at a
separate meeting, the time of which
will be announced later.
Football Seores
Chicago 9, Purdue 0.
Iowa 10, Notre Dame 0.
Wisconsin 24, South Dakota Aggies
3.
Oberlin 7, Ohio State 6.
Illinois 52, South Dakota 0.
Harvard 19, Indiana 0.
Yale 34, North Carolina 0.
Albion 24, Michigan Aggies 7.
Minnesota 28, Northwestern 0.
CORRECTION
In The Daily of Friday last, refer-
ence was made to Mr. Kemp Kenna, as
connected with the School of Music.
This is incorrect, Mr. Kenna is the
assistant director of the University Ex-
tension division.
-VARSITY BLOTTER NOTICE
Students who wish and have
not received a Varsity Blotter
may have the same by calling at
puylications office anytime next
Monday.

Attention is again called -by the Ath-
tic association to the fact that appli-
cations for tickets to the Ohio State
game, Oct. 22, must be in by Wednes-
day if they are to receive considera-
tion in accordance with the class of the
men applying. The conditions under
which seniority on the campus will be
taken into consideration are noted
fully on the reverse side of the order
blank which was distriuted with the
coupon books, and officials who are in
charge of the distribution of the tick-
ets wish to stress the last article,
which refers to the closing time of the
seniority rule.
Orders for tickets are still being re-
ceived daily and at the present time
it is estimated that fully 3,500 stu-
dents have neglected to mail in their
applications. The office is particularly
anxious to receive them as early as
possible, and before the date set for
the close of the class preference rul-
ing.
FNEW BASKETBAL
GMSAPPROVED
-Athletic Board Authorizes Cgtepsts
with Carnegie Tech.,
Colgate
NAVAL UNIT GIVEN LEAVE TO
DRILL ON SOUTH FERRY FIELD
Autiorization of the Varsity bas-
ketball schedule for the coming sea-1
son and consideration of the report
of the committee in charge of the con-
struction of the new stands at Ferry
field formed the main business of the;
Board in Control of Athletics last
night in the Union.
Two teams new to Michigan's court
schedule, Carnegie Institute of Tech-
nology on Dec. 29 and Colgate uni-
versity on Dec. 30 and 31 will this
year oppose the Wolverines. Both
contests are to be played in Water-I
man gymnasium.1
The report of the construction
committee brought out the fact that
it is expetced that the new stands will1
be entirely completed in time for theI
football contest with Ohio State uni-
versity on Oct. 22.
Permission was also granted by the
board for the use of south Ferry field
as a drill ground by the local unit of
the R. O. T. C.
UNION ARRNGES MIXER
FO11RIRST YEAR MEN
MEETING WILL SERVE AS FIRST
GET-TOGETHER FOR FRESH 7
THIS YEAR
Freshmen from all departments in
the University will Abe entertained
next Wednesday night at the first get-
together for freshmen given by the -Un-
ion this year. The committee in charge
of the entertainment has arranged a
program of vaudeville skits, speak-
ers, and music to amuse the men dur-
ing the unoccupied moments of the'
evening.
The party will last an hour and a
half or two hours and will be in the
nature of a general mixer and get-
together affair for all '25 men. The
Union will be host for the evening and

admission will be free. Refreshments
will be served during the presentation
of the program.
A. O. Cuthbert, '22E, Varsity cheer
leader, will be general master of cere-
monies for the evening. Jack Kelly,
'23, managing editor of the Gargoyle,
will be one of the principal speakers
on the program and an orchestra will
play dance music during the intermis-
sions. A boxing match and another
vaudeville skit have been arranged for
by R. E. Adams, Jr., '23, general chair-
man for the entertainment.
Masons to Break Ground for Temple
All Student Masons are' requested
to be present at the Masonic temple
-at 3:30 o'clock tomorrow afternoon
to take part in the ground-breaking
ceremonies for a new temple.

STRONG WOLVERINE BACKFIELD1
PROVES "POINT-A-HINUTE
MACHINE
VARSITY IMPROVES MUCH
OVER MT. UNION GAME,
Forward Pass Attack Successful;'
Case Makes Only One First 1
Down Against Yostmenj
Michigan trampled on Case for a
64-0 beating. In no department of thes
game was the scientific school able toI
compare with the Michigan team, and
for the twenty-fourth time the Maize
and Blue claimed a victory.
Backfield Strong
All in all the Michigan team played
better football than it did the weekt
previous. As was to be expectedt
many of the rough spots had beenE
ironed out and a more machine-like
and consistent team took the field
than had hitherto done so. Michi-
gan's backfield put forth a great bat-t
tle and as soon as the line can equal
the performance of the backfield,t
Yost will have a great team.
In yesterday's game the forward
wall did show an improvement. It
fought harder and charged better than
before. The entire game saw more
fight and determination with the nat-
ural result of a higher score. It must
be said, however, that Case was no'
better than was Mt. Union and prob-
ably even a bit weaker.7
Michigan's line broke through more
easily than it did against Mt. Union
and the resistance on the secondary
line was not as great as on the weekt
previous.
Complete Passest
That Michigan has a powerful back-
field cannot be denied. Again Frankt
Steketee starred. For the 15 minutest
that he was in the game, Stek simply
went mad. He tore around the ends,
picking his holes, following his inter-
ference, diving, plunging for longt
gains whenever calledhupon to carry
the ball. Yost took him out at the
end of the first quarter as he was
troubled with a wrenched arm.Kipke,
Usher, Banks, Uteritz, Searle, and
Roby cavorted at will.
Michigan attempted several passes
and was more successful in complet-
ing them than last week. The long
pass was called for in every case.
Case made but one first ,down and
that came only as the result of a pen-
alty for off-side. Nine touchdowns
with 8 goals and a safety made up
Michigan's score. Three more touch-
downs were made but were not al-
lowed because Michigan had been off-
side. Michigan made 26 first downs
and Coach Yost used 28 men in thej
course of the game. A detailed account
of the game follows:
* First Quarter
Captain Dunne won the toss and
chose to defend the west goal. Reed-,
kicked off to Steketee on Michigan's
20 yard line. Steketee returned the
ball to the 35 yard line. Kipke made
4 yards through right tackle. Stek-
etee took the ball for 15 yards on a
run around right end. Kipke hit right
tackle for a 5 yard gain. Usher made
2 yards through center. Kipke and
Banks added 4 yards and Steketee
failed to score a field goal from the{
40 yard line when the ball went short
of the goal posts.
Hamilton failed to gain for Case
and Sloat fumbled. Banks recovered
and it was Michigan's ball on Case's
20 yard line. Steketee hit the line
for 6 yards and Kipke made 10 on an
end run. Steketee made 2 through
center and Kipke failed to gain when

the Scientists fought fiercely to defend
their goal line. On the next play
Usher made 1 yard through right tac-'
kle and Kipke followed by scoring the
first touchdown. Steketee kicked
goal. Score: Michigan 7, Case 0.
Steketee kicked off to Mohr on
Case's 20 yard line Hamilton failed
to gain through Michigan's line and
Mohr made 6 yards around left end.
Hamilton punted to Banks, who was
downed on the 50 yard line. On the
next play Banks took the ball
through a broken field for a touch-
down, but was called back when Mich-

igan was penalized 15 yards for hold-
ing. Kipke made two yards off tac
kle. * Steketee skirted end for 16
yards and Usher added 4 through
right tackle. Uteritz went in for
Banks. Steketee punted to Linn on
Case's 8 yard line. Linn fumbled and
Cappon recovered for Michigan. Kipke
made 7 yards through . right tackle.
Usher failed by inches to make it a
touchdown. Steketee went over but
Michigan was called back and penal-
ized 5 yards for being offside. Van
Orden went in for Dunn. A pass from
Steketee to Kirk failed. Case's ball
on the 20 yard line. Mohr failed to
gain. Case's center passed the ball
over Hanmilton's head and Vick tac-
kled him behind the line for, a safety,
netting Michigan 2 points. Score:
Michigan 9, Case 0.
Case's-ball on her own 30 yard line.
Linn failed to gain. Hamilton punted
to Uteritz on the 50 yard line. Kipke
made 20 yards around right end and
the quarter ended with the ball on
Case's 30 yard line.
Second Quarter
Steketee made 29 yards around
right end, and was downed on Case's
1 yard line. On the next play Steketee
went through right tackle for a
touchdown. Steketee kicked goal.
Score: Michigan 16, Case 0.
Reed kicked off to Uteritz who car-
ried the ball back 28 yards, the ball
going into play on the,38 yard line.
Searle :went in for Steketee. Utertz
went through the line for 10 yards
and Searle hit the line for an added
7 yards. Kipke skirted left end for
15 yards. Uteritz followed with a 25
yard run and on the next play Kipke
went through for 8 more. Usher plung-
ed over for the third touchdown. Goe-
bel kicked goal. Score: Michigan 23,
Case 0.
Reed kicked off to Cappon, who re-
turned the ball 15 yards to Michigan's
38 yard line. Uteritz and Usher made
it first down on two line bucks. Kipke
failed to gain. Curran went in for
Kirk. A pass from Uteritz to Curran
failed. Kipke skirted left end for 15
yards and Searle took the ball for a
touchdown. Goebel kicked goal.
Score: Michigan 32, Case 0.
(Continued on Page Five)
I F U UIW POST PLUS FOR
YEAR OF ACTIVTIES
SING IN UNION TAP ROOM FIRST
OF GET-TOGETHER MEET-
INGS FOR "BUDDIES"
Arrangements for a starter on the
activites which the organization will
carry on this year *ere planned by
Richard N. Hall post, Veterans of For-
eign Wars, which met Wednesday
night in the Union.
Wednesday next, Oct. 12, the "bud-
dies" will meet at 9 o'clock in the tap
room of the Union, sing the songs of
"over there"-eat, drink, and be merry.
This is the first of a series of get-to-
gether meetings for the purpose of
getting better acquainted And the re-
newal of the days of '17.
October 19 there will be an official
meeting of the post in the Union as-
sembly hall, at which time new com-
rades will be initiated.
The University post will join with
the city post in celebrating Armistice
day. Following the parade all Uni-
versity men who saw service in the
World war have been invited by Miss
Eleanor Sheldon, social director of
Betsy Barbour dormitory, and Miss
Constant Baldwin, house president, to
attend a reception at Betsy Barbour
house.

FRESHMEN, NOTICE

MICHIGAN COUNTS 64-0 VICTORY
jOVER CASE, OUTPLAYING OHlOANS
IN ALL DEPARTMENTS 'OF GAME

i
..

Laxity in regard to conduct on
the part of this year's freshman
class will not be tolerated, ac-
cording to a statement issued by
the underclass conduct commit-
tee.
Offenders may be reported to
the following: A. B. McWood,
1460; Stanley Muirhead, 231;
Henry Hubbard, 566; Norman
Ross, 1399; Ed. Murane, .909.

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