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March 15, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-03-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY T

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer
year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
blication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
ted in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
matter.
subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Ml aynard Street.
Phone: Business. 96o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
re not necessarily to appear in pript but as an evidence of
and notices of events will be publised in The Daily at the
-etion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
iged communications will receive no consideration. No man-
ipt will be returned unless the writer incluses postage,
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex
ed in the communications.
"What's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
he evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
NAGING EDITOR .......--...GEORGE O. BROPHY JR.
, Editor..........................Chesser M. Campbell
T Ei. Adams H. W. Hitchcock
T I. Dakin J. E. McManis
Renaud Sherwood T. W. Sargent, Jr
a Editor...". ..BJ A. Bernstein
Erditor............... ..P. Campbell
rals............ Lee Woodruff.,L A. Kern, T. J. Whinery
its ...................... Robert Angell
nen's Editor................. .........Mary-- T . Lane
raph ........ ............. ....Thomas--Dewe
cope ....... ..... .... ..................Jack W. Kely
Assistants
phine Waldo Wallace F. Elliott kk. R. Meiss
I0. Weber Le'o J. Hersbdorfer Walter Donnelly
beth Vickery Hughston McBain Beata Has ey
. Clark Frank H. McPike Kathrine Montgomery
ge Reindel J. A. Bacon Gerald P. Overton
thy Monfort W. W. Ottaway Edward Lambrecht
y B. Grundy Paul Watzel Sara Wailer
ces Oberholtzer Byron Darnton H. E. Howlett
rt E. Adams M. A Klaver

,.,.

4.

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
SSS MANAGER ..........LEGRAND n. GAINES JR.
ng.............................. ..D. P. Joyce
.................Robt. 0. Kerr
ion....................* .........V. Mv. Heath
.... ...................E. R.' Prieh
n .-............................V. . Hillery
Assistants
ambrecbt P. H Hutchinson N. W. Robertson
ower %. F. A. Cre~ss R. C. Stearnes
1Kunstadter Robt. L. Davis Tos. L. Rice
V. Millard M. M. Moule D. G. Slaweon
reel 3r. D. S. Watterworth R. G. Burchell

the general demand for such games when the oc-
casion arises.
In justice to the teams who. fight so hard for
supremacy some'arrangement ought to be made to
let them finish the fight and enter into intersec-
tional games if possible.
FARES, THEN AND NOW
"Where could a more joyous excursion party be
found than can be gathered together from the U.
of M. students?" editorializes The Daily back in
the days of '9o and '91. "The Michigan Central
Railroad company will give us a rate of four do-
lars for the round trip to Niagara Falls if we as-
sure them a party of one hundred and twenty-five
or one hundred and fifty. Can we do it?
"Can we do it?" Imagine such a question being
propounded nowadays on the campus regarding a
similar trip. Four dollars !
In these days' of commission-pampered railroad
prices, when we risk our allowance and deplete the
usability of our exchequer for the next four
months every time we leave town, there is a sweet
melody in these words of the old daily. Back in
those happy days they did not have to worry
about the high cost of a travel and on occasion
could get a special car or train for almost nothing
if enough signified their intention of taking ad-
vantage of the excursion. They just got up and
went. In fact, a review of old papers shows us
that twenty dollars in those days would buy a
thousand mile ticket which was good anywhere at
any time and all the bearer had to do was to board
a train and have his miteage punched off.
There was an advantage about that kind of sys-
tem: in those days the athletic teams of the Uni-
versity could take trips without bothering a great
deal about the cost, and when a student on vaca-
tion wanted to visit his friends at home, all he had
to do was buy a thousand mile slip and he could
go anywhere on any road and1 visit the whole
crowd for about the price we now have to pay for
a trip to Chicago and back.
Perhaps nowadays the H. C. of Travel is mak-
ing for more of a sectionalism by keeping us all
closer home. We do not mean or condemn the
present order, but nevertheless those must have
been great days.
Dog-lovers are deluging President Harding with
canines of all breeds varying from a Japanese
spaniel to a St. Bernard, we gathr from Wash-
ington dispatches. Soon we may expect head-
lines inthe capital papers reading somewhat after
this fashion: "Harding- Meets Congress. Dog's
Bark Rouses-Sleeping Senators from Deep Slum-
ber," or, "Shep, White House Pet, Is Dead; Both
Houses'Hold Half-day Recess in Presidential Fav-
orite's Memory."
We want to know - does the large percentage
of Michigan grads in the Chicago Tribune's 'Ex-
Athletes Make Good" column simply mean that
our good friend, the Trib, is leading off the series
with Michigan, or does it indicate something more
vital? We hope and trust the latter.
Will somebody please turn in the name of the
humorist who, when the flagpole gun-crew unlim-
bered, saluted, stepped lively, loaded, stood back,
and then failed to go off, piped up in a shrill voice:
"Hi, you forgot to put in the shell!"
The Telescope

MARCH
S N T WY T F S
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
.13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 29 29 30 31
Men: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you dve to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.

G R:AHA'-M
Just Reeeit.d--
Marshall & Lyon--- OUR ECONOMIC ORGANIZATION
for Econ1
G 'TA' ED1 HA NAA
BOTH ANDS OF THE DIAGONAL WALK

D~ETRI~(T 1JNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Limileds to Jlackson at 8:48 a. mn. and!
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and every two1
hours to 9:48 p. m.
Locals to Detroit-5: 55a.m., 7.00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. mn.,
also 11:00 p. M. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson--7:5) a. in., and
12:;10 p.m .

997
This No.
for
Dodge
Taxi
D m~~ nr dm .urr rr

I

THE MAN ON THE FENCE should

TAKE A LEAP

And come and see us so that
WE may demonstrate to HIM
We can deliver a SUIT or OVERCOAT
With all the earmarks of 100% in

F.

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G.G
;und
ter M
.Han

UM3 ,=a.

Persons wishing to sec:re information concerning news for any
Issue of The Daily should se the night editor, who has full charge
of all news to be printed that night.
TUESDAY,. MARCH 15, 1921.
Night Editor-W. W. OTTAWAY
LET'S TAKE IT AT THE FLOOD
"There's a tide in the affairs of men which,
taken at the flood" - - begins a quotation that
sizes up pretty accurately the significance of Michi-
gan of the vote on the student advisory committee
tomorrow.-
tion of student affairs, we have been given an op-
portunity tomorrow to show by the number of in-
telligent votes cast that we have sufficient interest
in improvement to assume the responsibility, as
well as realize the fruits of, student self-govern-
ment. The change proposed by no means involves
control of student affairs outside of the campus
But it is an essential step that must be success-
fully carried out before further progress can be
made and it gives strong promise, of effecting a
new co-operation, advantageous to students and
faculty alike.
Giving as it may, an entirely new and desirable
trend to Michigan's government, aid affecting a
subject of paramount interest.to every student, the
balloting tomorrow will be no ordinary election. It
therefore behooves everyone of us to use extraor-
dinary care in employing our rightto vote as it
should be exercised. This means, first, that every-
one should cast, a ballot ; and ,second, that he should
use unusual care in so doing.
With the booths situated at several convenient
places on the campus there .will be no excuse for
anyone failing to cast a ballot. AIn regard to the
second duty, today is the time to get posted on the
questions to be presented and the record of the
candidates running for office. Let's make the elec-
tion a true and complete expression of Michigan
opinion, and choose a committee which will make
the advisory plan a success.
POST-SEASON GAMES
Although the 1921 basketball sason is officially
aver, no fair conclusion can be drawn as to which
team deserves the Conference championship. A
tie for first honors between three teams, each
:laiming to be the title-holder, makes an unsatis-
factory ending to a phenomenal basketball season.
If the policy of playing post-season games were
followed, this uncertainty would be done away
with and a great deal of satisfaction would be
given the winning team and the student body back
of that team.
It would not be difficult to keep the teams intact
long enough so that they could get together and
play off the tie, and it is certain that such a meet-
ng would create a great deal of interest and make
:he game profitable. Following this policy, there
would be no reason why games should not be
scheduled between'the winning teams of different
>arts of the country. The post-season football
game between Ohio State and California this year,
although in opposition to the Conference policy,
roved to be a success, as was shown by the large
number of people intensely interested in the out-
:ome. Similar games in the realm of basketball
,would make a more fitting close to such a season
as we have just gone through, because the team
:oihing out on top would receive the honor it had
!arned. In the past the general policy has been
Lgainst all post-season games, but this attitude
eems unwarranted when we take into ac~oint

THREEEXTENSI1N SERVICE
LECTURES, .RECITALS .GIVEN
Prof. William A. Paton, of the eco-
nomics department, spoke last night
on "The Significance of Accounting in
Modern Business," before the Pontiac
Commercial club. Prof. H. R. Cross,
of the Art department, delivered an
art lecture before the Federation of
Woman's clubs of Dettoit, yesterday
afternoon, at Detroit.
Prof; Earl V. Moore, of the School
of Music, gave an organ recital last
night in the Presbyterian church at
Birmingham.
These lectures and recital were giv-
en under the auspices of the Univer-
sity Extension service..
Use Classified advertising and sell
your miscellaneous articles.-Adv.

" MATERIAL

STYLE

FIT
WORKMANSHIP

J. KARL MALCOLM

604 E. LIBERTY ST.

fl

i

II ~ a r

I

We -don't see why so many
Of the boys kick about
The barbers in this town.
For our own part we think
That most of them use the
Finest shaving soap
We ever tasted.

Baster

=Wednesday and Thursday

Opening.

I

-

March 16th and 17th

ak

Music from 2 to 5 O'clock

MAN, AGED,59, WHIPS TWO THUGS
-news head.
Ha, fighting like 6o.
Dear Noah:
Can dentists be appropriately called artists?
R. K. H.
Certainly. Don't they draw from real life?

4

Exclusive models that accurately portray
the style tendencies of the Easter Season

f

.

Our Daily Novelette
I

Suits, Coats, Dresses.
Blouses, Shirts,Millinery
and Easter Accessories

She stood between the glaring man and his wife.
Her eyes filled with pity as her glance alternated
between the cowering wife and the enraged hus-
band. With an appealing motion she field out her
hands to them. "Please don't quarrel over me,"
she said in a trembling beseeching tone.
II;
The man looked at her. Maybe she was right
after all. Perhaps he and his wife had been fools
to quarrel over her. The tense lines about his
mouth relaxed and with a shamefaced grin he
turned to look at his wife. The girl seeing that
she had won her appeal started for the door.
With her hand on the doorkndb she spoke once
more. "I'm sure you wouldn't quarrel over me if
you only knew how it distressed me." And softly
closing the door she went down to her apartment
which was directly under theirs.
Famos Closing Lines
"A life of E's proved my downfall," said the
student as he packed up for home.
NOAH COUNT.

You qre Invited

6

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A!..!!w Ap

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124 South Main

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