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March 15, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-03-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'

RAINTORAY
TODA'Y

THER riimr iha
,T

Iat i3

ASSOCIATED
r PRESS
PAY AND) NIfIT l IE
'SERVICE

i

Vol. XXXI. No. 112. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY MARCH 15, 1921. PRICE FIVE CN

PA NAMA MAES
MOVEMFOR PEACE
WITH COSryTA RICA
PROTEST AGAINST SEC. HUGHES
FOUMER ANNOUNCEMENT
OVERCOME
NOTE KEEPS LEAGUE OUT
OF BOUNDARY DISPUTE
New Basis for Association Believed
Acceptable to Both
Countries
(BY Associated Press)
Washington, March 14.-A new basis
for association is bdlieved by officials
of the state department to be accept-
able to both Panama and Costa Rica in
settlement of their boundary dispute
outlined in a note dispatched to Pan-
ama today..
Replying to Panama's protest against
Secretary Hrughes announcement that
the arbitral award of Chief Justice
White must be put into effect in en-
tirety, the latest communication, while
adhering to the previous declaration
regarding the fixing of the boundary,
opens the door to settlement by agree-
ing to further discuss the Atlantic
end.
Note Considered Death Blow
The note is considered by diplomats
here to have dealt a death blow to
any possibility that the league of na-
tions might be called into the con-
troversy by citing provisions of the
treaty drawn in 1915, whereby Panama
and Costa Rica agreed to submit dis-
putes to the United States as mediator.
This treaty signed by the three powers
was negotiated by William Jennings
Bryan, then secretary of state, oas a
means of. safeguarding American in-
terests in Panama.
Today's note was interpreted as
meaning re-definition of the boundary
line would be favored by the United
States.
Dispatches Show Tranquility
A formal reply cannott be expected
from Panama until the latter part of
the week. Dispatches at the Panama
legation today indicated that complete
tranquility had been set up in the dis-
puted territory.
REPORTEDMUCH BETTER
President Marion L. Burton, who
has been suffering with an attack of
pneumonia, is gaining steadily each
day. His temperature has almost re-
turned to normal, and the indications
are that he will soon Ife over the
worst of the attack. It will be sev-
eral days, though, before he will be
able to be about his home.
-No definite decision has yet Veen
made as to whether the March meet-
ing of the Board of Regents will be
postponed because of the President's
illness, t
Enrollment tor Caunp Davis Under Way
Enrollment .for the summer camp at
Camp Davis is progressing fairly well
as the time approaches for the first
session.' The camp ths year will be
conducted in two periods of eight
weeks each and it is planned to acom-
modate 70 students during each period.

Nayal Reserve Ofeers Meet Tonight
With the express purpose of getting
in touch with all naval reserve officers
in college, a meeting of these men will
be held at 7:30 p'clock tonight in the
Union. The room number will be
posted,
Student Nomninafed for Supervisor
Roger iiapwarilg, '22T4, was nomin-
ated for supervisom on the Republican
ticket, in the fifth ward, yesterday.

WIEMAN WITHDRAWS
Le Grand A. Gaines,
President, Student Council,
Dear Sir:
IDregret very much that r am
unable to accept the candidacy
for membership on the student
advisory committee. The urgency
of other matters would mike it
impossible for me to serve effici-
ently, if elected, and I ask, there-
fore that my name be removed
or membership on the student
from the ballot, or at-least from
consideration at the polls._
Respectfully,
E. E. Wieman, '21.
V1 . F. WPRESENTS
AR, PLAY ONIGHT
"C'est ]a Guerre" to Consist of Varied
Acts In Typhleal French
Settings
FEMININE TALENT TO APPEAR
AS PARISIAN MADEMOISELLES
Promising to be one of the most un-
ique andtoriginal productions ever
given to the campus, "C'est la Guer-
re," the doughboy show, will be pre-
sented at- 8 o'clock this ovening in
Hill auditorium by the Richard N.
Hall post of the Veterans of Foreign
Wars. Contrary to the opinion of
many, the production is not in French.
Settings Typically French
Amid a typical French cafe setting,
crowded with -doughboys fresh from
the trenches chatting gaily with chic
mademoiselles who flit charmingly
from table to table, while an old gar-
con hobbles about busily, a series of
varied acts will be presented. Almond
Fairfield, '21, plays a dual role when
he takes the part of an old French
veteran of 1870, and later the part of
a British Tommy. Swanee humor
transplanted to the mud of Flanders
will bloom in the person of William
Braybrooks, '22, who will interpret
the latest variations of African golf.
The part of the dainty, petite madem-
oiselle from "gay Paree," whose agil-
ity will be displayed in the famous
Apache dance, is to be taken by M. B.
Small, '21, with whom every Yank in
the cafe immediately falls in love.
Two prominent members of the R. O.
T. C. are to appear on the stage in the
the persons of Major Robert Arthur
and Lieut. J. B. Hoorn. The
former will play the part of a spruce
American officer, while the latter rep-
resents an old garcon.
' British Humor a Feature
. Brltish humor, spontaneous and over-
flowing, is to be presented in the act
entitled "A Bit o' British," by Old Bill
an4d company. - The character of Old
' (Continued on Page Eight)

STATE FINANCES
NEED BOLSTERING
DECLARES FRIA

Chaperons Commend Mlanner In
Which Students Handle Soph Prom
Nothing but favorable comments

NOMINEES

REPORT
WILL

.INDICATES MICHIGAN
BE OUT OF FUNDS
BY OCTOBER

F A V O R S $10,000,000
BOND ISSUE AS REMEDY

Other Methods Suggested, Such
Levying Franchise Tax on
Corporations

as

Nominees for student advisory
committee to be voted on at the
campus elections Wednesday,
March 16, are as follows:
Seniors-four to be elected:
Robert Grindley, '21E,
Robert E. McKean, '21,
James I. McClintock, '22L,
Albert C. Jacobs, '21,
R. B. Reavill, '22L,
Lee M. Woodruff, '21,
Robert Angell, -'21.
Juniors-two to be elected:
R. J. Dunne, '22 (by peti-
tion),
D. Dow, '22E (by petition),
Hugh W. Hitchcock, '22,
0. W. Rush, '22,
Walter B. Rea, '22,
R. Emerson Swart, '22E.

were- expressed by the chaperons
when asked their opinions concern-
ing the recent Sophomore Prom. With
no exceptions, all agreed that the af-
fair was well conducted, quiet, and
contained all the qualities that make
up a party of the type that Michigan
should have.
Objections Inconsequential
"The sophomore class should be
proud of their Prom," said Joseph A.
Bursley, Dean of Students. "I think

II

it was an exceptionally fine affair and

I1

Acting on the request of Gov. Alex
J. Groesbeck and the state administra-
tive board, Prof. David Friday, of the
economics department, yesterday pre-
sented to the board an analytical re-
port of the finances of the state of
Michigan, in which he disclosed the
fact that the financial needs of Mich-
igan for the year 1921 will exceed the
present available funds by $5,140,000.
In the report, which is the first ac-
curate statement of the state's finances
made in recent years, Professor Friday
not only shows the reasons for the
state's bankruptcy, but has also out-
lined a plan which, if put into opera-
tion, may act as a solution to the finan-
cial situation.
Borrowing Power Limited
"Even if special appropriations are
wiped out, and if no new building pro-
jects are undertaken," says Professor
Friday in his statement, "the state will
absolutely be without funds for the
operation of its departments and in-
stitutions shortly after Oct. 1, 1921,
since it is not allowed to borrow in ex-
cess of $250,000."
On Jan. 1, 1921, the balance in cash
(Continued . on Page Eight)
$1700 EXPECTED,
TOTAL IN FUND
FOR DR. SARGENT

PACKERS TO MEET
FOR SETTLEMENT
March 21, Date Set for Conference
With Secretary of Labor
Davis
EMPLOYES WILL CONTINUE
WORK AT REDUCED WAGES

(By Associated Press)

Washington, March
of Labor Davis today
day, March 21, as the

14.-Secretary
proposed Mon-
date for repre-

sentatives of the packers and pack-
inghouse employes to meet with him
in an effort to reach an agreement
in the controversy growing out of
the cut made by the packing indus-
try in wages.
Both the packers and the employes
have agreed to send representatives

the committee should be congratulated
upon tfe results of their work. Out-
side of a few inconsequential details,
there were absolutely no objectional
features during the entire evening."
Prof.. Emil Lorch, of the architec-
tural department, when asked his
opinion concerning the Prom, said:
"You may quote me as being glad of
the opportunity to say that it was a
splendid dance, that the committee
deserves credit for the excellent way
they handled the affair, and that I
have never seen a University dance
that was better conducted." Mrs.,
Lorch was equally enthusiastic about
the party. ,
Prom Called Pretty Affair
"I consider that this Prom easily
surpassed the one given by last
year's sophomore class," said Mrs.
William C. Hoad. "It was an excep-
tionally pretty affair and the commit-
tee certainly deserves credit for the
way they managed to bring the Prom
to such/ an excellent 'degree of per-
fection."
Mlichigan jokers'
Score in Judge
Michigan scored heavily in the num-
ber of contributions printed in the Col-
lege Wits' number of Judge,' which
appeared yesterday, although no de-
oision as to the actual points 'secured
has been rendered.
The art staff were prominently rep-
resented with drawing by Lee Boyd,
'22, W. W. Gower, '22, Charles H.
Wolfe, '23, F. S. Randall, '23, and
James House, '23. Clement Smith, '23,
of the Gargoyle, and Jack Kelley, '23,
editor of The Daily Telescope, were
well represented with, jokes to their
credit. J. G. Newton, '23, also contri-
buted with his "Thoughts a la Green-
wich Village.".
Many schools contributing to this
number of Judge have not been enter-
ed in previous contests. Lack of space
has made it necessary to reprint some
of the winning jokes in next week's
issue in which the winners will be de-
finitely announced.

PETITIONS ADD 2
NES TO JUNIOR
LIST RF NOMINEES
DOUGLAS DOW, '22E, I. JEROME
DUNNE, '22, LATEST
CANDIDATES
ADVISORY COMMITTEE
TO BE VOTED ON WED.
Freshmen Eligible to Cast Ballots;
Turnout at Polls Evidence
of Interest
Two more men, Douglas Dow, '22E,
and R. Jerome Dunne, '22, have had
their names placed on the list of
nominees for the proposed student
advisory committee, through peti-
tions signed by 200 men. The junior
list now includes six names, from
which two men will be chosen at the
election Wednesday. Names of the
other nominees are to be found else-
where in The Daily.
The election Wednesday will decide
whether or not the new plan will be
accepted, - and will also select the
members of the committee if the pre-
posal is supported.
Several Booths Will Be Used
Balloting will take place at sever-
al booths. There will be one be-
neath the engineering arch, one in.
front of the Library, another at the
State street end of the diagonal, and
a fourth in front of the Union. Tell-
ers will supply ballots and aid in the
voting. The polls will be open from
9 o'clock in the morning until 3
o'clock in the afternoon. Every male
student on the campus, including
freshmen, will be eligible to vote, ac-
cording to C. N. Johnston, '21E, stu-
dent councilman in charge of the
election.
Large Vote Expected
"We expect a large vote on this
question," said Johnston. It is a
matter which requires a proof of
campus interest."
SHIELDS' SAYS ABILITY
fRADPERSONAITY COUT
DECLARES MAN'S COLLEGE WORK
DOES NOT AFFECT RATING
IN WORLD
Declaring that what a ihan does
in college has no effect on how the
outside world rates him except as it
has an effect -upon his personality,
Edmund C. Shields,, '96L, of Lansing,
who spoke Sunday afternoon in the
Union, endeavored to talk "as one
of the boys" and to give an accurate
account of what is demanded by em-
ployers of university graduates.
"When you get out of college you
are measured by your own personal-
ity and what you can do. You gill
forget almost all you learn here as
a matter of memory. What you do
here has no effect upon you unless
it develops your, personality, individ-
uality, originality and ability to do
things," he said.
- No Royal Road to Suecess"
"There is no royal road or formula
to attain success simply by relying on
your education. It is what you really
are. You will get what you are enti-
tled to on that basis alone."
Referring to his subject, "The Man
Out 'of College," he defined the char-

acter as a man of the "right blood,
right brain and the right spirit. We
come to college expecting that it will
help us to adapt ourselves quicker to
other surroundings.
"You are getting academic knowl-
edge. That's fine. But it isn't worth
anything if you can't practice it," he
declared. "Nothing is closed to you,
however, so get down and dig. Be as
(Continued on Page Eight)

Subscriptions amounting to $148.75 to Washington to confer with Secre-
on the Dr. Clara Sargent campaign tary Davis.
fund have been turned in at the of- While awaiting the outcome of me-
fice of the University Y. W. C.A ., at diation plans and the result of a
Newberry hall. Full reports from 30 strike vote, employes in the packing
workers who have not given account plants of Chicago and other centers
of their contributions, and from the in the Middle West had decided to go
nurses' unit of the Y. W. C. A. with to work today under the reduced
a quota of $250, which goes to the wage scale announced by the., five
Chicago office for Dr. Sargent's sal- leading packers, which goes into effect
ary, are expected to bring the total today. More than 100,000 are affected
well over the $1,700 mark. by the reductions of 15 and 12 1-2
Martha Cook building has donated per cent in the hourly rate and piece
over $500 raised by personal sub- work rates, respectively, with time
scription, an auction sale, a card par- and half for overtime after 10
ty, and other activities. Betsy Bar- hours;
bour house has raised nearly $200; "Any assumption that we are at-
the Delta Delta Delta and. Gamma tempting to establish a 10 hour day
Phi Beta sororities have subscribed is wrong," said a statement from
100 per cent, in addition 'to those Armour & company today in answer
houses already named. to charges of union leaders.

..

STUDENT ADVISORY

COMMITTEE CONSTITUTION

The constitution of the student advisory committee, as cor-
rected and proposed is as follows:
Article 1. The name of the committee shall be the student
advisory committee.
Article 2. The purpose of .the committee shall be to voice
sentiment of the student body to the Dean of Students,, to dis-
cuss with him matters pertaining to general policies of student
conduct, to submit recommendations on such matters to the
Dean of Students, and actively to assist the proper University
authorities in the enforcement of all rules pertaining to student
conduct.
Article )3. The committee shall be composed of four (4)
seniors and two (2) juniors. The president of the Michigan
Union, the president of the Student council, and the managing
editor of The Michigan Daily shall be ex-oficio members of the
committee.
Article 4. The officers of the Student council shall consti-
tute the nominating body for the committee and shall nominate
four (4) sophomores and four (4) juniors one week prior to the
spring All-campus election, at which election two (2) of those
nominated from each class shall be elected to the committee, the
sophomores to hold office for two (2) years and the juniors for
omfe (1) year.
Section A. Any sophomore or junior having a petition

signed by two hundred (200) students of the University .may
have his name placed on the ballot.
Section B. In case of vacancies other than by expiration of
office the nominating body for the committee and remaining
members of the committee shall have jointly the power to fill
the vacancy.
Section C. Any vacancy created by an elected member be-
coming an ex-officio member shall be filled as provided in sec-
tion B of this article.
Section D. The officers of the committee shall be a chair-
man, who shall not be an ex-officio member of the committee,
and a secretary, who shall be elected by the members of the
committee.
Article 5. The committee shall meet with the Dean of Stu-
dents at least twice a month.,
Article 6. In the event of any disagreement between the
committee and the Committee on Student Affairs the committee
by seven-ninths vote of its members shall have the power to
appear before the President and deans of the University..
Article 7. Amendments may be proposed by the committee
or by a petition signed by five hundred (500) male students
and placed on the ballot. Any duly authorized amendment may
be ratified by a two-thirds majority of the total ballots cast by
male students.

ALL STAIR
CAMPUS CAST

University Post VETERANS Of FOREIGN WARS Presenls

ALL STAR
CAMPUS CAST

C'est

la

Guerre

.1

Hill Auditorium

Written Produced and Acted by Men Who Were "Over There"

Tonight
50 Cents

)'clock

TICKETS AT GRAHAM'S

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